Skip to main content

Full text of "Athlete, The"

See other formats


Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/athletethe196970unse 




OWENSBORO HIGH SCHOOL BASEBALL TEAM 
K.H.S.A.A. CHAMPION- 1969 




(Left to Right) Front Row: L. Cox, B. Gaddis, T. Snedeker, T. Gabbert, D. Wellman, 
T. Brown. Second Row: M. Sturgeon, J. Price, B. Davis, B. Coomes, D. Shafferman, 
G. Hartsough. Third Row: Ass't Coach T. Meredith, Mgr. C. Watson, M. Strehl, D. Neal, 
B. Strawn, T. Baird, Coach J. Hicks. 



Official Organ of the 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

AUGUST, 1969 



KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL TRACK MEET-CLASS AAA 

Louisville, Kentucky, May 17, 1969 
Louisville Male High School Track Team-K.H.S.A.A. Champion 1969 




(Left to Right) Front Row: E. James, M. Jones, E. Wakefield, L. Dillard, J. LeMaster, B. White, D. Scrivener, R. Mur- 
ray, W. Coleman. Second Row: J. Clay, M. Johnson, T. White, C. Brown, J. Caffey, E. Love, H. Dallum, D. Brittle, W. Burks. 
Third Row: H. Croford, T. Witherspoon, A. Long, C. Trowell, C. Childers, D. Beard, R. Carpenter, M. Williams, W. Kuhn. 
Fourth Row: Mgr. R. Anderson, D. Starks, J. Banks, R. Bridgman, L. Tennyson, B. Smith, W. Gordon, R. Butler, K. Wallar, 
G. Wise, J. McCollum, Mgr. G. Benton. 



100 Yard Dash- 

1. Bowens-Thomas Jefferson 

2. Scrivener-Male 

3. Scully-Trinity 

4. Wells-Manual 

5. Geralds-lroquois 

Time-S 

220 Yard Dash- 

1. Bowens-Thomas Jefferson 

2. Scully-Trinity 

3. Wells-Manual 

4. K. Scully-Trinity 

5. Geralds-lroquois 

Time-i 

440 Yard Dash- 

1. Geralds-lroquois 

2. Conwell-Flaget 

3. McCoy-Eastern 

4. Boyd-Durrett 

5. Tennyson-Male 

Time-: 

880 Yard Run- 

1. Robinson- Flaget 

2. Dixon-Western 

3. McCrery-Atherton 

4. Banner-Butler 

5. Hammock-Durrett 

Time-: 

Mile Run— 

1. Harry-DeSales 

2. Matthews-Westport 

3. Hawks-Westport 

4. Boyd-Durrett 

5. Bailey-Butler 



120 Yard High Hurdles- 

1. Webb-DeSales 

2. Long-Durrett 

3. Wickliffe-Central 

4. Stanley-Eastern 

5. Cain- Valley 

Time- 14.6 

180 Yard Low Hurdles- 

1. Scrivener-Male 

2. Wickliffe-Central 

3. Long-Durrett 

4. Webb-DeSales 

5. Buckman-Westport 

Time-19.3 
Scrivener tied the state record with 
his time of 19.3. 

880 Yard Relay- 

1. Trinity 

2. Male 

3. Thomas Jefferson 

4. Seneca 

5. Central 

Time-1 :30.3 

2 Mile Run- 

1. Haley-Thomas Jefferson 

2. Pontrich-DeSales 

3. Greenburg-Westport 

4. McKie-Flaget 

5. Green-Manual 

Time-9:40.4 

Mile Relay— 

1. Male 

2. Flaget 



3. Iroquois 

4. Durrett 

5. Eastern 

Shot Put- 

1. McCollum-Male 

2. Sullivan-Southern 

3. Thomas-Iroquois 

4. Johnson-Western 

5. Boone-DeSales 

Pole Vault- 

1. Campbell-Eastern 

2. Welsh- Flaget 

3. Francis-Eastern 

4. Hampton- Valley 

5. Luckert-St. Xavier 



High Jump— 



Time-3:23.6 



Distance-51 '11' 



Height! 2' 3' 



Glass-St. Xavier 
Reed- Flaget 
Walthall-Fern Creek 
Adcock-Iroquois 
Korfhage-St. Xa 



Height-6' 2' 



LOllg Jump- 



Scrivener-Male 
Love-Male 

Schoenbaechler-Iroquois 
Bishop-St. Xavier 
Willock-St. Xavier 

Distance-22' 1 ' 



(Continued on Page Twelve) 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL XXXII-No. 1 



AUGUST, 1969 



$1.00 Per Year 



REPORT OF AUDIT 

1350 South 1st Street 
Louisville, Kentucky 
July 11, 1969 
Mr. Theodore A. Sanford, Secretary & Treasurer 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 
Lexington, Kentucky 
Dear Sir: 

Pursuant to instructions received, we have made an audit 
of the books and records of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL 
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION for the period of one year begin- 
ning July 1, 1968, and ending June 30, 1969. In addition, we 
have prepared and attached hereto statements of the Receipts 
and Disbursements which, in our opinion, reflect the true 
financial condition of the Association as of June 30, 1969. 
The Cash Funds on Hand and U. S. Savings Bonds and the 
Building and Loan Association savings accounts were found 
to be correct and verified by generally accepted auditing 
procedures. 

We find the records presented to us for the purpose of 
audit to be in agreement and in good condition. 

Respectfully submitted, 
HUET L. JOHNSON 
Certified Public Accountant 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

PERIOD FROM JULY 1, 1968, TO JUNE 30, 1969 

STATEMENT OF 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 

RECEIPTS: 

Balance in checking account July 1, 1968 ... . $ 14,951.17 

Annual Dues: 362fe $3.00 $ 1,086.00 

Officials' Dues: 

Football: 625 @ $3.00 1,875.00 

Basketball: 1430 @ $3.00 .... 4,290.00 
Baseball: 446 @ $3.00 1,338.00 

Reciprocity Officials: 

Football: 58 @ $1.00 58.00 

Basketball: 40 @ $1.00 40.00 

Baseball: 4 @ $1.00 4.00 

Officials' Fines 215.00 

Redeposits (Bad checks made good) 63.00 

Advertising in Magazine 1,495.00 

Sale of Publications 362.18 

Ticket Sales-Annual Meeting . . . 524.00 

Interest Received from Certifi- 
cates of Deposit & Savings Accts. 2,900.00 

Interest Received from Govern- 
ment Bonds 2,772.00 

Sale-lst Security Natl. Bank & 
Trust Co. -Savings Certificates . 60,000.00 

Transferred from State Basketball 
Tournament Account 176,566.81 

Refunds 202.38 

Receipts— State Baseball Tourna- 
ment 1,914.00 

Football Playoffs: 
A & AA Ticket Sales 10,501.00 
AAA Ticket Sales 19,698.50 
A AA & AAA Pro- 
gram Profit 891.73 

A, AA & AAA Pro- 
gram State Tax . . . 36.67 31,127.90 
• Track Meets: 
State Meets Receipts 

(Lexington) 754.00 

State Meet Profits 
(Louisville) 98.67 852.67 

Wrestling Tournament: 
State Tournament Re- 
ceipts 1,768.00 

Regional Tournament 



Receipts-State Swim Meets . . . 
Receipts— State Gymnastics Meet 



1,888.50 
970.50 
210.00 



DISBURSEMENTS: 

Board of Control Expense 

Commissioner's Salary (Base Sal. $18,000.00) 

Expense-Commissioner's Office 

Ass't Commissioner's Salary (Base Sal. $15,500) 

Travel Expense — Ass't Commissioner 

Secretarial Salaries 

Janitor's Salary 

Postage 

Office Supplies 

Janitor Supplies 

New Equipment 

Insurance 

Equipment Repairs &. Service Contracts .... 

Blue Cross & Blue Shield 

Building Repairs & Grounds Maintenance . . 

Utilities 

Telephone and Telegraph 

Fidelity Bonds 

Printing 

Appropriation to K.A.P.O.S 

Purchase of Publications 

Delegates to Natl. Fed. Meetings 

National Federation Dues 

Appropriation to Kentucky D.G.W.S 

Rental on Films 

Audit 

Bad Checks 

Miscellaneous Disbursements 

Meals— Annual Banquet 

Speaker— Annual Banquet 

Taxes and Withholdings: 
Federal Income Tax Withheld. . . . 8,340.50 

Social Security 3,211.48 

City Income Tax Withheld .... 767.15 
State Income Tax Withheld .... 1,244.92 
State Sales and Use Taxes 2,219.65 

Transfer of Funds: 
Savings Certificates 

Insurance Subsidy 

K.H.S.A.A. Retirement Fund 

Magazine: 

Printing and Engravings 6,118.07 

Mailing 200.00 

Officials' Division: 
Honorariums and Expenses- 
Clinics 1,453.68 

Printing & Miscellaneous Expenses 139.29 

Schools for Officials 2,709.15 

Expenses — Regional Clinics .... 368.23 
Officials' Emblems 1,383.81 

Swimming: 

State Committee Expense 739.49 

Trophies and Medals (State Meets) 1,093.30 

Officials (State Meets) 457.98 

Mileage and Local Entertainment 

(State Meets) 3,181.40 

Pool Rental & Additional Services 479.20 

Ticket Sellers & Takers (State Meet) 88.00 

Golf: 
Mileage and Local Entertainment 

(State Tournament) 2,154.30 

Trophies and Awards 1,832.49 

Miscellaneous Expenses 843.99 

Tennis: 
Mileage and Local Entertainment 

(State Tournament) 1,199.40 

Trophies and Balls 2,642.37 

Expenses-Tournament Managers . . 197.75 

(Continued on Page Thirteen) 



7,754.27 

13,715.70 

531.97 

11,565.68 

1,160.28 

12,466.39 

1,467.92 

2,746.00 

1,112.48 

44.63 

4,229.49 

2,180.85 

1,300.38 

1,334.70 

530.81 

1,413.31 

1,535.08 

45.00 

3,464.05 

300.00 

5,007.17 

6,639.01 

205.90 

500.00 

85.00 

140.00 

83.00 

50.00 

2,409.00 

100.00 



60,000.00 
32,757.50 
25,010.00 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1969 



AUGUST, 1969 



VOL. XXXII-No. 1 



New Assistant 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 40501 

Second class postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Ralph C. Dorsey (1966-70) Horse Cave 

Vice-President .... Foster J. Sanders ( 1 966-70). Louisville 
Directors-Morton Combs (196 8-7 2), Carr Creek; W. H. Crow- 
dus (1968-71), Franklin; Don Davis (1967-71), Independ- 
ence; James T. Dotson (1968-72), Johns Creek; Lee T. Mills 
(1969-73), Frankfort. 

Subscription Rate SI. 00 per Year 

zflom the Commissione'i s CJffice 

Football Clinics 

The 1969 clinics for football officials and coaches will 
be conducted by Supt. Edgar McNabb of the Beechwood 
Independent School District, Fort Mitchell. Mr. McNabb has 
been the K.H.S.A.A. representative on the National Federa- 
tion Football Committee for several years. The dates and 
sites of the clinics aie as follows: August 15, Bell County High 
School, Pineville, 7:30 p.m., August 16. Hazaid High School. 
1:30 p.m.; August 16, Prestonsburg High School, 7:30 p.m.; 
August 17, Paul G. Blazer High School. Ashland. 1:30 p.m., 
August 22, Reservoir Hill, Rec. Center, Bowling Green, 7:30 
p.m.; August 23. Tilghman High School. Paducah, 7:30 p.m.; 
August 24, Henderson High School, 1:30 p.m., August 26, 
Kentucky Hotel, Louisville, 7:30 p.m.; August 27, Transylva- 
nia College. Lexington, 7:30 p.m.; August 30, Campbell 
County High School, Alexandria, 2:00 p.m. 
Registration of Officials 
Football and basketball officials previously registered 
have received their renewal application cards for the 1969-70 
school year. Two hundred seventy of these officials failed to 
file their 1968-69 reports on or before the deadline set by the 
Board of Control for the submitting of reports, and it was 
necessary to impose fines on these officials who failed to 
comply with Association rules. It is an Association require- 
ment that each registered official attend the clinic in the 
sport in which he is registered. Fourteen football officials and 
sixty-three basketball officials were suspended in 1968-69 for 
failure to attend clinics. 

Attention, Principals! 
Each principal of a K.H.S.A.A. member school will be 
supplied during the forthcoming school year with a card 
which will say: "Kentucky High School Athletic Association 
-This will introduce (name of principal), (name of school)." 
The card will be signed by the Commissioner. Most adminis- 
trators of Association member schools admit to their home 
contests fellow administrators as a matter of school policy. 
However, many times these visitors hesitate to identify them- 
selves to the ticket takers. The card mentioned will assist in 
this identification. 

The identification cards are not to be considered as regu- 
lar season passes to home games of member schools of the 
K.H.S.A.A. The determining factor in the cards being ac- 
cepted as passes is the policy of the individual school. 

The identification card may be used for admission to all 
events at the state level except the State Basketball Tour- 
nament. A different plan for issuing these passes, along with 
passes to the district and regional basketball tournaments, is 
provided in basketball tournament regulations. 




Billy V. Wise 

Billy V. Wise, athletic director for the Lexington Rec- 
reation Department and a veteran sports official, has been 
named to the staff of the Kentucky High School Athletic 
Association as an Assistant Commissioner. He assumed his 
new duties on August 1 . 

The duties of the new assistant at first will be primarily 
in the field of registration and training of officials. He 
is eminently qualified for this, having been registered with the 
Association for ten years in football and fourteen years in 
basketball. He was a K.I.A.C. basketball official for twelve 
seasons, a Southeastern Conference official for five. He was a 
high school baseball official for ten years. 

The new assistant, who is thirty-seven years of age, was 
born in Scott County, the son of Mr. and Mrs. George H. 
Wise. He attended Scott County Elementary School, the 
Stamping Ground High School, and Transylvania College from 
whicli he graduated with a B.A. degree. He did one year of 
graduate work at the University of Kentucky. During the 
1952-54 period, he was in the U. S. Army. He was a part-time 
employee of the Lexington Recreation and Parks Department 
during the 1955-57 period, and has been employed full time 
by the department since 1957. 

Mr. Wise holds membership in numerous professional 
organizations. He is a member of the Church of Christ, 
Liberty Road, Lexington. He is married to the former Bonnie 
JeanGoodan. There are three children, Stephen. 12; Gary, 10; 
and Melissa, 6. 

Minutes of Board Meeting 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association met at the K.H.S.A.A. office, Lexington, 
on Saturday morning, June 7, 1969. The meeting was called 
to order by President Preston Holland at 9:00, with Board 
members W. H. Crowdus, Don Davis, Ralph C. Dorsey, James 
T. Dotson, Don R. Rawlings and Foster J. Sanders; Commis- 
sioner Theo. A. Sanford, and Assistant Commissioner J. B. 
Mansfield present. The invocation was given by Don R. 
Rawlings. 

Ralph C. Dorsey moved, seconded, by W. H. Crowdus, 
that the reading of the minutes of the April 10th meeting be 
waived since members of the Board had received copies of 
these minutes. The motion was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner stated that the minutes of the April 
Board meeting, which appeared in the May issue of the 



Page Three 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1969 



Girls' Tennis Winners 



Paul G. Blazer Rifle Team Wins 




(Left to Right) E. McGuire, Sacred Heart, state singles 
champion; S. Sturma, J. Wheeler, Tates Creek, state cham- 
pionship doubles team 

ATHLETE, had listed incorrectly the name of Thomas Moore 
School for the Marion C. Moore High School in Basketball 
District 27. 

The Commissioner presented several suggested changes 
in K.H.S.A.A. regulations. These were: 

Amend Regional Track Rule VIII, to read as follows: 

"In any meet (boys) a contestant may compete in not 
more than four events. A contestant who participates in the 
880, one-mile or two-mile run shall not be allowed to partici- 
pate in any other track event in which he runs 880 or more 
yards. 

"In any meet (girls) a contestant may compete in not 
more than four events. She may compete in only two events 
the distances of which are 440 yards or more." 

Add a second paragraph to Regional Track Rule XIII 
to read as follows: "If there is a tie in a track event, the 
medals shall be awarded by lot unless the first place winner is 
determined by a run-off." 

Change in weight classifications given in Regional Wres- 
tling Rule VII (to comply with 1969-70 weights recom- 
mended in Official Wrestling Guide), to read as follows: 
"Competition shall be divided into weight classes as follows: 
98, 107, 115, 123, 130, 137, 145, 155, 165. 175, 185, 
unlimited." 

Substitute "shall" for "should" in District and Regional 
Baseball Rule VI. 

Amend Regional Golf Rule X, to read as follows: 

'The winning and runner-up boys' teams qualify for 
the first round of the team tournament. The eight boys with 
the lowest scores will qualify for the first round of the indi- 
vidual tournament. 

"The winning and runner-up girls' teams qualify for the 
State Tournament. Also qualifying will be the five girls, not 
on a qualifying team, with the lowest scores." 

Amend State Golf Rule III, to read as follows: 

"Eligible to enter the first round of the boys' team 
tournament are the teams qualifying from each region. 
Eligible to enter the second round are the twelve teams with 
the lowest scores after the first round. 

"Eligible to enter the first round of the boys' indi- 
vidual tournament are the players qualifying from each 
region. Eligible to enter the second round are the forty-eight 
boys with the lowest scores after the first round. 

"Eligible to enter the second round of the girls' tourna- 
ment are all players who compete in the first round." 

Foster J. Sanders moved, seconded by lames T. Dotson, 
that the rules changes recommended by the Commissioner be 
adopted. The motion was carried unanimously. 



(Left to Right) Front Row: M. Caldwell. W. Willis, R. Cal- 
vert, J. Stamper, J. Burton. Second Row: B. Hall, L. Wessel, 
H. McAlister, A. Wolfe, Major Hershberger, R. Wheeler, E. 
Daniel, J. Dunham, G. Quails. (Inset) S. Waldie, Owensboro, 
individual champion. 



The Paul G. Blazer High School Rifle team won the 8th 
State Rifle Championship on April 26, with the team score of 
1313. It was the first state win for the Ashland school. Scott 
Waldie of the Owensboro High School won individual honors 
with 274 points. 

Seven teams competed in the tournament, which was held 
at the University of Kentucky. Major James G. Coston man- 
aged the tournament. Owensboro High School was second in 
scoring with 1306, and Seneca High School was third with 
1287. Team and individual scores were as follows: 

Paul G. Blazer (1313)-Willis, 260; Burton, 267; Stamper. 
254; Calvert, 269; Caldwell, 263. 

Owensboro (1306)-Waldie, 274; Carter, 264; Funk, 258; 
Matthews, 258; McGehee, 252. 

Seneca (1287)-Ayat, 269; Cecil, 261; Edwards, 249; 
Paskey, 269; Smith, 239. 

McKell (1267)-T. Powell, 273; D. Powell, 256; Lybrook, 
252; Potter, 234; Warnock, 252. 

Thomas Jefferson (1267)-Scott, 265; Napper, 246; 
Groebli, 252; Towater, 256; Cooley, 248. 

Millersburg Military Inst. (1022)-Fischesser, 219; Harig, 
222; McGregor, 175; McMillin, 252; Wolfsan, 154. 

Western Sinai (920)-Hyatt, 199; Stinnett, 153; Shouse, 
167; Darnell, 202;Drury, 199. 

Don Davis, Chairman of the Building Committee, gave a 
report for his committee. He stated that several sites for a 
possible new Association building had been inspected by the 
committee on the preceding day, and that the Commissioner 
had been asked to secure information for the committee con- 
cerning the approximate costs of the sites, the possible expan- 
sion of the present building, estimate of the present sale 
value of the K.H.S.A.A. building, and other pertinent infor- 
mation, reporting this to the committee at a later date. 

Chairman Ralph C. Dorsey of the Personnel and Policy 
Committee made several recommendations for his committee. 
These were as follows: 

I. For 1969-70 the spring calendar in golf and tennis in 
the regional and state meets shall be moved to later dates. 

II. As soon as possible, an additional executive should be 
employed by the Board with his duties to be assigned by the 
Commissioner. The Personnel and Policy Committee might be 
authorized by the Board to employ a third executive and set 
his salary, upon the recommendation of the Commissioner. 

(Continued on Page Five) 



?e Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1969 



Middlesboro (5) 



Jessamine County (8) 



LaRue County (0) 



Owensboro (1) 



PaulG. Blazer (1) 



Westport (0) 



Covington Holmes (0) 
North Marshall (1) 



Kentucky High School Baseball Tournament 
Sports Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 



June 4-6, 1969 



Jessamine County (0) 



Owensboro (7) 



Owensboro (1) 



PaulG. Blazer (6) 



North Marshall (0) 



PaulG. Blazer (0) 



Tournament Officials 
"Bunny" Davis, Danville 
Don Hardin, Morehead 
Jim Johnson, Frankfort 
Jim Kidwell, Covington 
Jim King, Jefferson town 
Richard Morgan, London 
Richard Morse, Radcliff 
Bill Ring, Lexington 
Jack Smith, Somerset 



Owensboro 
Champion 



All-Tournament Team 
lb-Mike Strehl, Owensboro 
2b-David Staten, Paul Blazer 
3b-Fred Liebee, Paul Blazer 
ss-Barry Gaddis, Owensboro 
of-J. D. Barrett, No. Marshall 
of-Tim Warren, Jessamine Co. 
of-Tim Huff, Paul Blazer 
c-Mike Morgan, Jessamine Co. 
p- Ricky Rhodes, Westport 
p-Bernie Strawn. Owensboro 



Thirty-Sixth Annual Kentucky High School Tennis Tournament— Roys 
Louisville, May 30-31, 1969 

SINGLES 
QUARTER- 
FINALS 

Cooper-St. Xavier Cooper SEMI- 





Dayton-Fort Knox 


6-3; 6-1 


FINALS 

Cooper 
6-1 ; 6-1 


FINALS 

Cooper 
6-4; 6-1 






Mitchell 
7-5; 1-6; 6-4 






Mitchell-Flaget 






Howell 
6-3; 6-0 






Richardson Woodford Co. 






Bowling 

6-1 ; 6-4 




I 


Bowling Bowling Green 




Bowling-Bowling Green | 


Hodges 
5-7; 7-5; 6-3 






Deal-Bellevue 






Howell 
6-2; 6-1 






Howell K. M. I. 






Hodges 
8-6; 6-1 






Murray-Henry Clay 






Hammer 
3-6; 6-3; 6-4 


Cooper 
6-0; 6 




Chadwell-Shelbyville 








Hammer-Tompkinsville 






Hodges 
6-1; 5-7;7-5 






Hodges-Western 






Roberts 
6-4; 6-4 






Hart-Bellevue 






Weller 
6-3; 6-1 






Spencer-Murray 












Wei ler- Middlesboro 






Roberts 
6-3; 6-0 






Fletcher-Berea 












Roberts-Trinity 











THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1969 



Page Five 





Ky. Military Inst. 


DOUBLES 

SEMI- 
FINALS 

Ky. Military Inst. 
2-6; 7-5; 10-8 


FINALS 

St. Xavier 
6-1; 7-5 






Henderson 






St. Xavier 
9-7; 6-2 






Lafayette 






Bellevue 
6-3; 6-1 






St. Xavier 






Meade County 
6-4; 6-3 


St. Xavier 




Meade County 


L_ 6-4; 2-6; 6-4 






Paul Blazer 


Paul Blazer 






Bellevue 
6-1; 6-3 




Western 


Paducah Tilghman 












Bellevue 

















BOARD MINUTES 

(Continued from Page Three) 

III. Upon study of the receipts and disbursements in the 
1968-69 budget, it is recommended that a transfer of 
$20,000.00 be made from the General Fund to the Retire- 
ment Fund. 

W. H. Crowdus moved, seconded by Don R. Rawlings, 
that Proposal I of the Personnel and Policy Committee be 
adopted. The motion was carried unanimously. 

Ralph C. Dorsey moved, seconded by Foster J. Sanders, 
that Proposal II of the Committee be adopted. The motion 
was carried unanimously. 

James T. Dotson moved, seconded by W. H. Crowdus. 
that Proposal 111 of the Committee be adopted. The motion 
was carried unanimously. 

Ralph C. Dorsey stated that the Committee had certain 
recommendations to make concerning salary increases for 
the Commissioner and the Assistant Commissioner. The Com- 
missioner asked that he and Mr. Mansfield be excused from 
the meeting while there was a discussion of their salaries. In 
the executive session of the Board, Ralph C. Dorsey moved, 
seconded by James T. Dotson, that the annual salaries for the 
Commissioner and the Assistant Commissioner for 1969-70 
be set respectively at $20,500.00 and $17,500.00. The mo- 
tion was carried unanimously. 

Ralph C. Dorsey presented to the Board the 1969-70 
K.H.S.A.A. budget, previously recommended to his Commit- 
tee by the Commissioner, the budget being amended to 
include the salaries mentioned. The estimated receipts are 
$224,500.00, and the estimated disbursements are $224,- 
075.00. Don Davis moved, seconded by James T. Dotson, 
that the 1969-70 budget as presented be adopted. The motion 
was carried unanimously. 

James T. Dotson made the following motion which was 
seconded by Don Davis: "To better inform present and 
future. Board members concerning the Association, the Com- 
missioner is directed to prepare for the summer meeting of 
the Board a report to include for the 1957-69 period: 
salaries of executive and staff members; insurance, social 
security and other fringe benefits; and other pertinent infor- 
mation that would be of value." The motion was carried 
unanimously. 

The Commissioner stated that the subcommittee which 
had been appointed by the Board to make recommendations 
at the April meeting concerning possible basketball re-district- 
ing in Regions 6 and 7 had another recommendation to 



State Championship Tennis Team 




(Left to Right) T. Cooper, St. Xavier, state singles cham- 
pion; T. Tafel, J. Lancaster, St. Xavier, state championship 
doubles team. 



make. This was that the St. Xavier High School be moved to 
District 25, and that the Country Day High School be moved 
to District 26. Foster J. Sanders moved, seconded by Ralph 
C. Dorsey, that the basketball re-districting recommended by 
the subcommittee be adopted. The motion was carried 
unanimously. 

James T. Dotson moved, seconded by W. H. Crowdus, that 
all bills of the Association for the period beginning April 1, 
1969, and ending May 31, 1969. be allowed. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

There being no further business, the meeting adjourned. 

Football Examination 

Part II of the National Federation Football Examina- 
tion for officials will be given in Kentucky on Monday, Sep- 
tember 15. An official who has been registered for at least one 
year prior to the current season is eligible to take the exami- 
nation and work for a higher rating. Officials who hold the 
Approved rating in football are required to make a minimum 
percentage grade of 80 in order to maintain this rating from 
year to year. After an official has received the Certified rating, 
he continues to receive this rating each year provided that he 
attends the clinic for that year and has worked in at least six 
first team high school football games during the previous year. 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1969 



KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL TRACK MEET-CLASS AAA 

Louisville, Kentucky, May 17, 1969 
Eastern High School Track Team— K. U.S.A. A. Champion 1969 




(Left to Righl 
Watson. L. Mai 



t Row: P: Best. D. Mitchell. B. Trowell. S. Davis. S. Groman. B. Smith. Second Row: vV. Martin. 
Cook. M. L. Martin, S. Hardin. V. Mitchell. G. Hurt. Coach Tom Abbott. 



50 Yard Hurdles- 

Samuels-Male 
Sterchi-lairdale 
Green-Male 

Titus-Thomas Jefferson 
Hardin-Eastern 

Time-7.8 

70 Yard Hurdles- 

Green-Male 
Sterchi-Fairdale 
Titus-Thomas Jefferson 
Hughes-Central 
Thompson- West port 

Time 1 0.0 

50 Yard Dash- 

1. Martin-Eastern 

2. Sistruck-Male 

J. Roundtree-Fairdale 

4. Bowman-Thomas Jefferson 

5. Milsap-Male 

Time-6.4 

75 Yard Dash- 



McManus-Central 
Sadler I-airdale 
Davis-Eastern 
Crittenden-Seneca 
Senters-Iroquois 



McManus set a 
her time of 8.8. 

100 Yard Dash- 

1. McManus-Central 

2. Cook-Eastern 

3. Sadler-Fairdale 

4. Senters-Iroquois 

5. Wilson-Male 



Time-8.8 
state record 



220 Yard Dash- 

1. McManus-Central 

2. Cochran-Shawnee 

3. Trowell-Eastern 

4. George-Durrett 

5. Davis-Eastern 

Time-25.5 
McManus set a new state record wi 
her time of 2S.5. 

440 Yard Run- 

Houchins-Valley 
Best-Eastern 
Martin-Eastern 
Hughes-Central 
Kleinert-Sacred Heart 

Time-1 :01.' 

880 Yard Run- 

1. Best-Eastern 

2. Loud-Durrett 

3. Roth-Valley 

4. Montgomery-Thomas Jefferson 

5. Hardgesly-Eastern 



Time-2:32.6 



440 Yard Relay - 



Eastern 

Male 

l-airdale 

Durrett 

Shawnee 



880 Yard Relay- 



Durrett 
Eastern 

Thomas Jefferson 
Fern Creek 
Male 



880 Yard Medlev Relay - 

Eastern 

Valley 

Male 

Thomas Jefferson 

Fern Creek 



lime-1 :56.S 



Shot Put- 

1. Wheeler-Iroquois 

2. White-Male 

3. Holman-Fern Creek 

4. Barnett-Valley 

5. Callahan-Thomas Jefferson 

Distance-39' 
Wheeler set a new state record witi 
her distance of 39'. 

Discus— 

1. Laha-Southern 

2. Wheeler-Iroquois 

3. Strong-Male 

4. Craven-Western 

5. Simmons-Thomas Jefferson 

Distance-107'7' 

High Jump— 

Hughes-Centrai 
Austin-Westport 
Gillespie-Sacred Heart 
Underwood Fairdale 
Buck-Western 



Long Jump- 



Time-l :48.9 



Fischer-Mercy Academy 

Carter-Male 

Buck-Western 

Kelly-Loretto 

Meredith-Durrett 



Distance-1 6'6" 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1969 



Page Seven 

Mercy Academy 6 

Shawnee 5 

Sacred Heart 4 

Western 4 

Loretto 2 



TOTAL POINTS Durrett 15 

48 Valley 15 

4 Iroquois 13 

,! Westport 7 

^ c "' ,a ,' t% Southern 6 

S i« Tfi Fern Creek 6 

Thomas Jefferson lb 



Eastern 

Male 

Central 



Tenth Annual Kentucky High School Tennis Tournament— Girls 
Metropolitan Tennis Center, Louisville, May 30-31, 1969 



Taylor-Somerset 


QUARTER- 
FINALS 

Metzroth 
6-4; 6-2 


SINGLES 

SEMI- 
FINALS 

McGuire 
7-5; 6-1 








Metzroth-Manual 


McGuire 
6-0; 6-1 








Wheeler-Tates Creek 


Gillim 
6-4; 4-6; 6-1 


FINALS 






McGuire-Sacred Heart 


Ramsey 
6-1; 6-0 


McGuire 
6-3; 6-2 




Goody koontz-Southern 


Rowlett 
6-0; 6-1 




Ramsey-Elizabeth town 


Gillim 
6-4; 4-6; 6-1 




Gillim-Collegiate 


Woody 
6-3; 1-6; 6-4 




Watson-Henry Clay 


Miller 
6-1; 6-2 




Ross-Caverna 


Miller-Henderson 


Woodv 
3-6; 6-4; 6-4 


Woody-Holy Rosary 


Rowlett 
1-6; 6-3; 6-2 




Segura-Sacred Heart 


Rowlett 

6-2.6-3 




Rowlett-Murray 








LaCroix-Bellevue 


Burton 
6-1; 6-1 








Foreman-Highlands 










Burton-Paul Blazer 







McGuire 
6-1; 7-9; 6-0 



TENNIS DOUBLES-GIRLS 



Tates Creek 


SEMI- 
FINALS 

Tates Creek 
6-3; 9-7 


FINALS 

Tates Creek 
6-2; 6-2 




Collegiate 


Highlands 
6-2; 6-1 




Glasgow 


Sacred Heart 
6-0; 6-1 








Highlands 


Holy Rosary 
64; 6-4 


Tates Creek 




9-7; 7-5 


Hopkinsville 








Holy Rosary 


Sacred Heart 
6-4; 6-3 








Franklin County 










Sacred Heart 







Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1969 



KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL TRACK MEET-CLASS AA 

Lexington, Kentucky, May 17, 1969 
Paducah Tilghman High School Track Team— K.H.S.A.A. Champion 1969 




(Lefl to Right) Front Row: Coach R. Gross, J. L. Wilson, B. Backus, J. Caskey. B. Littlejohn. B. Williams. Second Rov 
Coach J. G. Whiteley, D. Harriford, D. Etheridge. P. Day. D. Watkins. R. Etheridge. Third Row: C. A. Cissell. B. Florenc 
R. Holland, K. Brewer, R. Jones, T. Welch. K. Humphrey. 



100 Yard Dash - 



Blair Bryan Station 
Crockett-Paducah Tilghman 
Coll ins-Ma disonville 
Welch- Elizabethtown 
Barham-Knox Central 

Time- 10.0 



220 Yard Dash- 



Jordan -Owen sboro 
Crockett-Paducah Tilghman 
Blair-Bryan Station 
Barham Knox Central 
Kesling -Paul Blazer 



Tiri 



440 Yard Dash- 

1. Jordan-Owensboro 

2. Blair-Bryan Station 

3. Hayden-Paducah Tilghman 

4. Kazee-Boyd County 

5. Carman-Danville 

Time 48.5 

880 Yard Run- 

1. Peterson-Elizabethtown 

2. Troxler-Woodford County 

3. Bolin Owensboro 

4. Humphrey-Paducah Tilghman 

5. Heihman-Highlands 

Time-1 :59.7 

Mile Run— 

1. Nichols-Elizabethtown 

2. Rose-Greensburg 

3. McHie-Paul Blazer 

4. Coffman-Madisonville 

5. Bruin-Bryan Station 

Time-4:28.0 



2 Mile Run- 

1. Bondi-Newport Catholic 

2. Lovell-Henderson County 

3. Jones-Paducah Tilghman 

4. Meyer-Lafayette 

5. Dawson-Danville 

Time-10:02 

1 20 Yard High Hurdles- 

1. Hisle-Bryan Station 

2. McMannon-Newport Catholic 

3. Hogston-Paul Blazer 

4. Watkins-Paducah Tilghman 

5. Keltner Greensburg 

Time-1 4.8 

180 Yard Low HurdJes- 

1. McMannon-Newport Catholic 

2. Greenfield-Owensboro 

3. Jones-Lafayette 

4. Hogston-Paul Blazer 

5. Watkins-Paducah Tilghman 

Time-20.3 

880 Yard Relay- 

1 . Paducah Tilghman 

2. Lafayette 

3. Paul Blazer 

4. Henderson County 

5. Newport Catholic 



Shot Put- 

Weathers-Woodford County 
Bailey -Mad isonville 
Davis-North Marshall 
Taylor-Lloyd 
Edington-Shelby County 

Distance-5 2'1 1 W 

Pole Vault- 

1. Harriford-Paducah Tilghman 

2. Boyd-Bryan Station 

3. Cunningham-Paul Blazer 

4. Johnson-Danville 

5. Ramsey-Elizabethtown 



Mile Relay— 

1 . Owensboro 

2. Lafayette 

3. Newport Catholic 

4. Elizabethtown 

5. Johnson Central 



Time-1 :29.6 



Time-3:22.0 



High Jump- 



Height- 13' 



Wilson-Union County 
Simons-Shelby County 
Nafus-Campbell County 
Shulman-Paducah Tilghman 
Hones- Russell 



Height-6' 4' 



Long Jump- 



Greenfield-Owensboro 

2. Freeman-Lafayette 

3. Harriford-Paducah Tilghman 

4. Briggs-FYanklin Simpson 

5. Simpson-Covington Holmes 

Distance-22' 

Triple Jump— 

1. Briggs-Franklin Simpson 

2. Dawson-Danville 

3. McMannon-Newport Catholic 

4. Harriford-Paducah Tilghman 

5. Ward- Lafayette 

Distance-46' 3' 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1969 



Page Nine 



Discus— 

1. Foster-Lafayette 

2. Davis-North Marshall 

3. Fischesser-Covington Catholic 

4. Dillard-Henderson County 

5. Smallwood-Knox Central 

Distance-152' 2" 

TOTAL POINTS 

Paducah Tilghman 38 

Owensboro 31 

Lafayette 24 



Bryan Station 24 Shelby County . . 

Newport Catholic 23 Knox Central . . 

Elizabethtown 17 Campbell County 

Paul Blazer 15 Covington Catholic 

Woodford County 10 Lloyd 

Madisonville 9 Boyd County . . 

Danville 8 Russell 

Henderson County 8 Highlands .... 

Franklin-Simpson 8 Covington Holmes 

North Marshall 7 Johnson Central 

Union County 6 

Greensburg 5 



KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL TRACK MEET-CLASS AA 

Lexington, Kentucky, May 17, 1969 

Christian County High School Track Team— K.H.S.A.A. Champion 1969 




(Left to Right) Eldridge Rogers, Carolyn Arkin, Patti Marquess, Barbara Croney, Parr. Houchens. Wanda Newton, Vira 
Caldwell, Kelsa Young, C. A. Meisel. 



50 Yard Hurdles- 

1. Gipson-Austin Tracy 

2. Thurmond-Lynn Camp 

3. Badgett-Madisonville 

4. Marquess-Christian County 

5. Webb-Franklin County 

70 Yard Hurdles- Time-7.4 

1. Sleet-Boyle County 

2. Gipson-Austin Tracy 

3. Badgett-Madisonville 

4. Hellabush-Ludlow 

5. Marquess-Christian County 

Time-9.9 
Sleet set a new state record with 
time of 9.9. 

50 Yard Dash- 

1. Croney-Christian County 

2. Brpwn-Owensboro 

3. Mahan-Paul Blazer 

4. Baker- Franklin County 

5. Frecking-Boone County 

Time-6.2 



75 Yard Dash- 

1. Arkins-Christian County 

2. Walker-Harlan 

3. Rogers-Bardstown 

4. Harrington-Bryan Station 

5. Crenshaw-Russellville 

Time-8.8 
Arkins set a new state record with her 
time of 8.8. 

100 Yard Dash- 

1. Rideway-Paducah Tilghman 

2. Combs-Franklin County 

3. Mahan-Paul Blazer 

4. Sleet-Boyle County 

5. Rogers-Bardstown 

220 Yard Dash- Time- 11.7 

1. Croney-Christian County 

2. Hertzel-Frankfort 

3. Mahan-Paul Blazer 

4. Sherrod-Madisonville 

5. Benton-Russellville 

Time-2 5.8 



440 Yard Run- 

1. Moorman-Owensboro 

2. Caldwell-Christian County 

3. Johnson-Frankfort 

4. Rosson-Paul Blazer 

5. Ross-Fort Knox 

Time-58.8 
Moorman set a new state record with 
her time of 58.8. 

880 Yard Run- 

1. Moorman-Owensboro 

2. Rice-Boyd County 

3. Ireland-Sayre 

4. Ballenger-Middlesboro 

5. Blakeman-Greensburg 

Time-2:24.3 
Moorman set a new state record with 
her time of 2:24.3. 



440 Yard Relay - 



Paducah Tilghman 
Franklin County 
Owensboro 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1969 



Paul Blazer 
Boyle County 



880 Yard Relay 



Christian County 
Franklin County 
Owensboro 
Paul Blazer 
Boone County 



Time-1:45.7 
state rec 



880 Yard Medley Relay- 



Owensboro 

2. Frankfort 

3. Paducah Tilghman 

4. Boyd County 

5. Fort Knox 

Time-1 :52.9 
Owensboro set a new state record 
with the time of 1:52.9. 

Shot Put- 

1. Matthews-Temple Hill 

2 Shumpert-Paducah Tilghman 

3. McComis-Paul Blazer 

4. Carmack-Oneida 

5. Kakins-Henderson County 

Distance-36'6" 



Discus— 

1. Taylor-Paul Blazer 

2. Thomas-Oldham County 

3. Shumpert-Paducah Tilghman 

4. Holder-Owensboro 

5. Casey-Henry Clay 

Distance-9 8'%" 

High Jump— 

1. Greenwell-Paducah Tilghman 

2. Steele-Russellville 

3. Lewis-Fleming County 

4. Zender-Boone County 

5. Frasher-Lexington Catholic 

Height 4'9" 

Long Jump— 

1. Houchens-Christian County 

2. Mann-Owensboro 

3. Cox-Henry Clay 

4. Ballenger-Middlesboro 

5. Murphy-Carroll County 

Distance- 1 7'6'/i" 
Houchens set a new state record with 
her distance of 17'6'/i". 

TOTAL POINTS 

Christian County 37 

Owensboro 34 

Paducah Tilghman 28 



Paul Blazer 24 

franklin County 15 

Frankfort II 

Austin Tracy 10 

Boyle County 9 

Madisonville N. Hopkins 8 

Temple Hill 6 

Boyd County 6 

Russellville 6 

Boone County 4 

Henry Clay 4 

Middlesboro 4 

Lynn Camp 4 

Bardstown 4 

Oldham County 4 

Harlan 4 

Sayre 3 

Fleming County 3 

Ludlow 2 

Fort Knox 2 

Oneida Inst 2 

Bryan Station 2 

Carroll County | 

Henderson County 1 

Greensburg i 

Lexington Catholic 1 



Beat the Heat 

Every football coach, athletic trainer, and team physician 
should understand the physiological basis for the development 
of heat fatigue, heat exhaustion, and heat stroke, including 
the signs and symptoms. In addition, they should know and 
execute the proper procedures for their prevention, recogni- 
tion, and care. 

Heat fatigue can dull the athlete's skill and alertness and 
make him more vulnerable to injury. The other two heat 
illnesses can result in serious physical harm and even death. 
Both are preventable. 

Heat exhauslion and heat stroke are p,eventable only by 
careful control of various factors in the conditioning program 
of the athlete. Basic, of course, is an adequate medical history 
and medical examination prior to participation in practice. 
With the start of fall practice, it is essential to provide for 
gradual acclimation to hot weather activity. Equally impor- 
tant is the need to adjust salt and water intake to weather 
conditions. 

As the athlete becomes accustomed to hot weather activ- 
ity, he perspires more freely (and thus dissipates body heat) 
and excretes less salt (and thus conserves sodium). With a 
graduated training regimen, such acclimation can be expected 
to take place over a period ol about one week. 

The old idea that water should be withheld from athletes 
during workouts has no scientific foundation. In fact, such 
restriction, by depleting water in the body, can lead to heat 
fatigue and serious heat illness. During exercise in the heat, it 
is essential to replace -at least hourly -the water lost by per- 
spiration. 

Salt also needs to be replaced daily, particularly during 
the acclimation period. Extra salting of the athlete's food 
within the bounds of taste will accomplish this purpose. Salt 
tablets, particularly on an empty stomach, can be irritating 
and may be poorly absorbed. Adding one teaspoon of salt to 
six quarts of flavored water used for drinking during hot- 
weather workouts offers another approach. 

Even after acclimation, it is advisable to alternate periods 
of strenuous exercise with periods of rest during hot weather. 
Also it is important for the coach to observe his athletes care- 
fully for signs of lethargy, inattention, stupor, awkwardness. 




CLARK COUNTY WINNERS 

Cheerleaders of the Clark County High School won first 
place in the K.A.P.O.S. "Sweet Sixteen" contest during the 
1969 State High School Basketball Tournament. Members of 
the group in the picture above are: (Left to Right) Ellen 
Green, Carol Codell, Shelley Wiseman, sponsor Jane Miller 
Smith. Sarah Rye, Tay Breene, Debbie Rainey. 

or unusual fatigue. Symptoms ol water and salt depletion 
may include sluggishness, headache, nausea, hallucinations 
and/or weak and rapid pulse. If heat illness is suspected, 
prompt attention to recommended emergency procedures 
may have vital importance. 1 

The following suggestions are offered to help coaches pre- 
vent heat exhaustion and heal stroke during hot-weather 
athletic activity: 

1) Require a careful medical history and checkup prior to 
the beginning of practice. 

2) Schedule workouts during cooler morning and early 
evening hours in hot weather. 

3) Acclimate athletes to hot-weather activity by carefully 
graduated practice schedules. 

(Continued on Page Fourteen) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1969 



Page Eleven 



KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL TRACK MEET-CLASS A 

Lexington, Kentucky, May 17, 1969 
Frankfort High School Track Team-K.H.S.A.A. Champion 1969 





















r 

: 

N-pga 

■I: "■ 
I 



(Left to Right) Front Row: Larry Robinson, Fantley Smither. Second Row: John Redding, James Washington, Don 
Peden. Tom Clay, Hugh Archer. 



1 00 Yard Dash- 2 Mile Run- 

1. Robinson-Frankfort 

2. Sprague-Bellevue 

3. Johnson-South Marshall 

4. Burks-Caverna 

5. Coons-Mt. Sterling 

Time- 10.2 

220 Yard Dash- 

1. Robinson-Frankfort 

2. Sprague-Bellevue 

3. Bentley-Jenkins 

4. Sharp-University 

5. Johnson-South Marshall 

Time-22.3 

440 Yard Dash- 

1. Bentley-Jenkins 

2. Sprague-Bellevue 

3. Mays-Washington County 

4. Reiff-Ky. Mill. Inst. 

5. Bull-Glasgow 

Time-SO. 6 

880 Yard Dash- 

1. Smither-Frankfort 

2. Reiff-Ky. Mili. Inst. 

3. Martin-Trigg County 

4. Gillenwater-Glasgow 

5. Coffee-Monticello 

Time-1 :57.6 

Mile Run— Mile Relay- 

1. Daffron-Monticello 1. Frankfort 

2. Wade-Mercer County 2. Bellevue 

3. Ryder-Bellevue 3. Glasgow 

4. Lewis-Glasgow 4. Ky. Military Inst. 

5. Hill-Bardstown 5. Morgan County 

Time-4:29.6 



1. Upchurch-Monticello 

2. Bowsher-Lexington Catholic 

3. Nanny-Murray 

4. Eddy-Dayton 

5. Wathen-Bardstown 
Time-1 0:00.0 

120 Yard High Hurdles- 

1. Nicely-Raceland 

2. Thurmond-Lynn Camp 

3. Crites-Murray 

4. Kelly-Monticello 

5. Kraus-Bardstown 
Time-1 5.6 

180 Yard Low Hurdles- 

1. Reed-Washington County 

2. Brunnegraff-Monticello 

3. Walz-Bellevue 

4. Feeples-Fulton 

5. Jones-Bath County 
Time-20.8 

880 Yard Relay- 

1. Frankfort 

2. Harlan 

3. University 

4. Murray 

5. Montgomery County 



Time-3:28.8 



Shot Put- 

1 . Stuart-Glasgow 

2. Manuel-Millersburg Mili. Inst. 

3. Toth-Jenkins 

4. Farthing-Burgin 

5. Searcy-Carroll County 

Distance-67' 
Jesse Stuart set a new state record 
with the distance of 67'. 

Pole Vault- 

1. Descombes-Millersburg Mili. Inst. 

2. Jones-Trigg County 

3. Wander-Ky. Mili. Inst. 

4. Delaney-Bellevue 

5. Johnson-Jenkins 
Linebaugh-Montgomery County 

High Jump- Height-13'6" 

1. Childs-Shelbyville 

2. Farris-Hazel Green 

3. Edwards-South Marshall 

4. Ward-Morgan County 
Coons-Mt. Sterling 

Long Jump- Height-6' 

1. Bivens-Bardstown 

2. Brunnegraff-Montgomerv County 

3. Clay-Frankfort 

4. Reed-Jenkins 

5. Yates-Ballard Memorial 

Triple Jump— Distance-22 ' %" 

1. Bivens-Bardstown 

2. Brunnegraff Montgomery County 

3. Kirksey-Harlan 

4. Roche-Lexington Catholic 

5. Stamper-Prichard 

Distance-44' 1 1" 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1969 



Discus— 

1. Manuel Millersburg Mili. 

2. Hathaway-Providence 

3. Webb-Jenkins 

4. Rowe-Bardstown 

5. Beverly-Henry County 

Distanc 



Inst. 



Glasgo 

Ky. Mili. Inst. . . 

Washington County 
-146' Murray 

South Marshall . . 

Trigg County . . 

Harlan 

Lexington Catholic 

Frankfort 33 Shelbyville .... 

Bellevue 23 Raceland 

Jenkins 18 University . . . . 

Bardstown 17 Hazel Green . . . . 



TOTAL POINTS 



Millersburg Mili. Inst 16 Providence 4 

Monticello 15 Lynn Camp 4 

Montgomery County 14 Mercer County 

14 Mt. Sterling 

11 Caverna 

9 Burgin 

8 Fulton 

7 Dayton 

7 Prichard 

7 Morgan County 

6 Henry County 

6 Carroll County 

6 Ballard Memorial 

5 Bath County 



2Vi 



K.H.S.A.A. TRACK MEET 

(Continued from Inside Front Cover) 
Triple Jump— 

1. Wright-Fern Creek 

2. Scrivener-Male 

3. Winstead-Shawnee 

4. Green-DeSales 

5. Waldner-Bishop David 

Distance-4 3' 10' 

Discus— 

1. Sutton-Trinity 



2. Spellman-Central 

3. Sells-Valley 

4. Block-Valley 

5. Boone-DeSales 

Distance-] SO'10" 
TOTAL POINTS 

Male 41 

Flaget 24 

Trinity 23 

DeSales 22 

Thomas Jefferson 21 

Iroquois I9'/> 

Eastern 15 



Durrett 14 

Central 12 

Westport 11 

St. Xavier 11 

Fern Creek 8! 

Waggener 6 

Manual 6 

Valley 5 

Southern 4 

Atherton 3 

Butler 3 

Shawnee 3 

Seneca 2 

Bishop David 1 




(Left to Right) M. Burns. G. Baird. J. Cox. C. Russell. 
(Inset) J.Johnson, Owensboro Catholic, individual champion. 

Covington Catholic Team Is Champion 

The Covington Catholic High School Golf team won the 
1969 State Tournament, held at the Lindsey Golf Course, 
Fort Knox, on May 20-21. Jeff McGill of the Owensboro 
High School was the winner in the State Individual Tourna- 
ment, held at the Anderson Golf Course, Fort Knox, a week 
later. Both tournaments were managed by John Hackett, 
Director of Secondary Fducation at Fort Knox. 

Scores of the leading teams were: Covington Catholic, 
627; Bowling Green, 628; St. Xavier, 634; Tates Creek, 635; 
Trinity, 640; Owensboro, 643; Murray, 648; Lebanon, 655. 

Individual scores of some of the tournament leaders were: 

145-McGill (Owensboro), Moore (Berea) (McGill won 
title on First hole of sudden-death playoff) 

146-Thomas (Dixie Heights) 

147-Proctor (Bowling Green), Rice (Oldham County) 

148-Russell (Allen County) 

149-Hurley (Covington Catholic) 

150-Jenkins ( Bowling Green), Barnhart (Tates Creek) 

151 -Stansel (Covington Catholic), Traxel (Mason County) 

152 -Quertermous (Murray), Houillion (St. Xavier) 

153 -Mahan (Clark County), Gray (Lebanon) 
154-Irey (Paul G. Blazer) 



(Left to Right) R. Stansel, B. Schari . Coach T. Lanham. 
D. Hurley, D. Laake. (Inset) J. McGill, Owensboro, individual 
champion. 

Waggener Golfers Are Winners 

The 5th K.H.S.A.A. State Golf Tournament for Girls was 
held at the Middlesboro Country Club Golf Course on May 
20-21. The Waggener High School team won the champion- 
ship with a score of 703. Janice Johnson of Owensboro 
Catholic was the individual winner, with a score of 15 3. The 
tournament was managed by Miss Matilda Walker of the 
Westport High School. 

Seven full teams competed in the tournament, having 
qualified in regional competition. These teams and then- 
scores were: Waggener, 703; Owensboro, 769; Bowling Green. 
811; Lafayette, 811; Franklin County, 841; Westport. 862; 
London. 885. 

Individual scores of some of the tournament leaders were: 
153 Johnson (Owensboro Catholic) 
162 Welsh (Madison Central) 
165 -Kyle (Highlands) 

166 Baird (Waggener) 

167 Lear (Tates Creek) 

168 Pitchford (Scottsville) 

172 Burns (Waggener), Cox (Waggener) 
173-Van Hoose< Lafayette) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1969 



Page Thirteen 



AUDIT 

(Continued from Page One) 

Track: 

Regional Expenses '..... 1,419.86 

Trophies and Medals 6,913.44 

Officials 981.20 

Mileage and Local Entertainment 

(State Meets) 7,038.67 

Miscellaneous Expenses (State Meets) 147.03 

Equipment Rentals (State Meets) 73.50 

Ticket Sellers & Takers (St. Meets) 60.00 16,633.70 
Baseball: 
Refunds on District Tournament 

Deficits 1,781.20 

Trophies and Awards 2,089.04 

Refunds on Regional Tournament 

Deficits 316.80 

Baseballs 75.00 

Transportation (State Tournament) 675.50 

Meals (State Tournament) 1,620.00 

Ticket Sellers and Takers (State 

Tournament) 80.00 

Lodging (State Tournament) .... 1,200.00 

Public Address Announcers .... 60.00 

Scorer (State Tournament) .... 25.00 

Umpires (State Tournament) .... 702.30 

Expenses-Ass't Mgr. (St. Tourney) . 80.00 

Groundsmen (State Tournament). . 52.50 
Miscellaneous Expenses (State 

Tournament) 38.83 8,796.17 

Cross Country: 
Mileage and Local Entertainment 

(State Meet) 1,260.04 

Trophies and Awards 1,527.27 

Expenses-Regional Meets 20.72 

Expenses-State Meets 114.85 2,922.88 

Football Playoffs: 

Printing 93.20 

Trophies and Awards 961.43 

Transportation 440.00 

Lodging 450.00 

Meals 1,064.00 

Field Rental-Refund on Labor 812.23 

Officials 647.80 

Ticket Sellers, Takers & Guards . 375.50 

P. A. &. Scoreboard 60.00 

Footballs 132.30 

Statisticians 342.55 

Incidental Expenses-Board Grant . 3,600.00 

Press Box Expense 29.40 

Special Police 162.10 

Honorarium & Expenses-Game 

Managers 275.65 

Ambulance Service 40.00 

Miscellaneous Expenses 200.00 9,686.16 

Rifle Marksmanship: 
Mileage and Local Entertainment 

(State Tournament) 312.60 

Trophies and Awards 88.28 

Officials (State Tournament) . . . 135.00 535.88 
Wrestling: 

Expenses- State Committee . . . 555.81 

Trophies and Awards 573.25 

Officials (State Tournament) . . . 396.00 
Mileage and Local Entertainment 

(State Tournament) 1,097.20 

Miscellaneous Expenses (State 

Tournament) 224.90 

Printing 87.25 

Rentals (State Tournament) . . . 158.00 

Custodial Service (State Tourney) 43.00 

Police (State Tournament) . . . 123.75 
Refunds on Regional Tournament 

Deficits 5.58 

Film 250.0 3,514.74 

Gymnastics: 

Expenses-State Committee . . . 359.25 

Trophies and Awards 219.05 

Officials (State Meets) 430.00 

Mileage and Local Entertainment 

(State Meets) 522.95 

Miscellaneous Expenses (State 

Meets) 192.11 1,723.3 6 

Total Disbursements .' $288,764.06 

Receipts $305,706.11 

Disbursements 288,764.06 

Cash Balance $ 16,942.05 



BANK RECONCILEMENT 

Balance per bank statement, Jun 
Less Outstanding Checks: 



No. 873 
No. 916 
No. 978 
No. 990 
No. 1004 
No. 1076 
No. 1166 
No. 1180 
No. 1195 
No. 1247 
No. 1261 
No. 1263 
No. 1264 
No. 1265 



$ 60.00 

15.00 

60.00 

184.40 

13.20 

139.50 

26.40 

84.00 

51.80 

34.00 

120.85 

100.00 

190.89 

103.41 



1,183.45 



True Bank Balance June 30, 1969 $ 16,942.05 

1969 STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 
RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
RECEIPTS: 

Ticket Sales $227,134.50 

Profit on Programs 4,937.83 

Radio Fees 3,150.00 

Television Fee 6,031.25 $241,253.58 

DISBURSEMENTS: 

Printing 

Trophies and Awards 

Postage 

Insurance 

Incidental Expenses (16) Teams 

Transportation 

Lodging 

Meals 

Coliseum Rental 

Organist 

Officials' Fees and Expenses . . . 

Scorers and Timers 

Shot Chart Keepers &. Statisti- 
cians 

Ushers 

Ticket Sellers, Ticket Takers &. 
Guards 

Public Address Announcers . . 

Films 

Towel Service 

Miscellaneous Expenses-Tourna- 
ment Manager 

Honorariums & Expenses-Ass't 
Tournament Managers 

Soloist 

State Sales Tax 

Transfer of Funds-Amount Trans- 
ferred to K.H.S.A.A. as Tourna- 
ment Profit 

BANK RECONCILEMENT 

Balance per bank statement, 

June 30, 1969 

Less Outstanding Checks: No. 85 . 
True Bank Balance June 30, 1969 



1,370.68 

768.86 

250.00 
1,760.00 
8,000.00 
2,489.90 
7,439.72 
8,810.91 
9,068.00 
60.00 
1,806.00 

703.00 

470.00 
4,076.00 

4,167.25 
320.00 
400.00 
170.00 

49.1 1 

1,491.25 
20.00 
10,996.09 $ 64,686.77 



$176,566.81 



1968-69 K.H.S.A.A. RETIREMENT FUND 
RECEIPTS: 

Balance July 1, 1968 

Transferred from K.H.S.A.A. 
General Fund 

Interest Received from Certifi- 
cate of Deposit 

DISBURSEMENTS: 

Certificate of Deposit- 1st Fed. S. 

& L. Association 

Certificate of Deposit-Bank of 

Commerce 

Savings Account-lst Fed. S. & L. 

Association 

Insurance Premiums 

Bank Service Charge 



315.29 
25,010.00 

500.00 $ 25,825.2 8 

4,000.00 
15,000.00 

5,000.00 

1,572.65 25,572.65 



Cash Balance . 



ASSETS: 

Cash Balance-lst Security Natl. Bank &. Trust Co. 
Central Bank & Trust Co. -Certificate 



252.33 
10,000.00 



Page Fourteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1969 



Bank of Commerce-Certificate 15,000.00 

1st federal S. &. L. Assn. -Certificates 9,000 00 

1st Fed. S. &. L. Assn. -Savings Account 3.783.50 

1st Security Natl. Bank & Trust Co. -Savings Acct. 21,073.91 

Total Retirement Fund Assets $ 59,109.74 

TOTAL ASSETS 

Funds on Hand: 

Cash Balance-lst Security Natl. Bank & Trust $ 16,942.05 

U. S. Savings Bonds (value, June 30, 1969) . . 83,288.00 

Savings Certificate-Central Bank & Trust Co. 10,000.00 
Savings Certificates-lst Security Natl. Bank & 

Trust Co 60.000.00 

Savings Account-lst Federal S. & L. Assn. .. 10,000.00 

Savings Account-Union Fed. S. & L. Assn. . . 10,000.00 

Savings Account-Lexington Fed. S. &. L. Assn. 10.000.00 

Retirement Fund Assets 59,10 9.74 

Total Funds on Hand, June 30, 1969 . ... S259 339.79 

Estimated Value of K.H.S.A.A. Bldg. &. Equip. 103,133.00 

Total K.H.S.A.A. Assets $362,472.79 




New Football Film 

A new football film, FOOTBALL BY THE RULES, has 
been produced under the sanction of the National Federation 
of State High School Athletic Associations and the National 
Alliance Football Rules Committee. Prints of the film, a 
16mm, 28 minute sound film in color, have been secured by 
the K.H.S.A.A. and placed on loan with the Film Library, 
College of Education, University of Kentucky. 

The film will give viewers a better understanding of the 
rules and a keener appreciation of football as played at the 
interscholastic and intercollegiate levels. Modern motion pic- 
ture photography presents a colorful panorama of football 
play situations that portray the guidelines used by officials in 
making hundreds of judgment decisions so necessary in this 
action-packed sport. 

Following are some of the pertinent areas of the rules 
code that are included in the film: The Neutral Zone, Pass 
Interference, "First Touching" of a Kick. Snap Infraction, 
Fair Catch, Penalty Enforcement, Starting and Stopping the 
Clock. The production is made possible by two good friends 
of athletics, Wilson Sporting Goods Company and Desenex 
Foot Care Products. 

BEAT THE HEAT 

(Continued from Page Ten) 



4| Provide rest periods of 15 to 30 minutes during work- 
outs of an hour or more in hot weather. 



5) Supply clothing that is white to reflect heat, brief, 
loose, and comfortable to permit heat escape and permeable 
to moisture to allow heat loss via sweat. 

6) Furnish extra salt and water in recommended amounts 
during hot weather. 



7) Watch athletes carefully for signs of trouble, particu- 
larly interior linemen and the determined athlete who may 
not report discomfort. 

8) Remember that temperature and humidity, not the 
sun, are the crucial factors. Measuring the relative humidity 
by use of a sling psychrometer on the field, is advantageous in 
this regard. 2 Heat exhaustion and heat stroke can occur in 
the shade. 

9) Know what to do in case of such an emergency, in- 
cluding immediate first aid practices and prearranged proce- 
dures for obtaining medical care. 



DUPONT MANUAL CHAMPIONS 



In the State-At-Large contest for cheerleaders, held during 
the 1969 State High School Basketball Tournament, first 
place was won by the duPont Manual squad. Members of the 
group in the picture above are: (Left to Right) Kneeling, Can- 
dace Simmons, Fonda Byrns. Standing, sponsor, Mrs. Joanna 
Conover; Lo Ann McHugue. Mary Ortense, Captain Brenda 
Winders, Judy Cox, Rhonda Grace. 



10) Outlaw the hazardous warm wea'ther use of rub- 
berized apparel or other dehydration devices by players. 

Ill Advise all potential players who plan to work out 
prior to the official practices about heat stroke and heat ex- 
haustion. Proper workout will help pre-condition them and 
help them to acclimatize sooner. (Remind them about Point 
10: especially in their private workouts.) 

Some teams encounter hot weather during the season 
either through intersectional travel or following an unseason- 
ably cool period. By this time, the athletes should be physi- 
cally fit; nevertheless, they will not be environmentally fit. 
Coaches who face this situation are advised to schedule prac- 
tices preceding the game at the warmest time of the day, to 
diligently subscribe to the other recommendations above, and 
to substitute during the game more frequently than normal. 
The result will benefit the team's performance as well as the 
health of the athletes. 

'First Aid Chart for Athletic Injuries, American Medical 
Association. 1965: 



HEAT ILLNESSES 
Heat Stroke: Collapse-with dry warm skin- indicates 
sweating mechanism failure and rising body temperature. 
THIS IS AN EMERGENCY; DELAY COULD BE FATAL. 
Immediately cool athletes by the most expedient means 
(immersion in cool water is best method). Obtain medical care 
at once. 

Heat Exhaustion: Weakness -with profuse sweating-indi- 
cates state of shock due to depletion of salt and water. Place 
in shade with head level or lower than body. Give sips of 
dilute salt water if conscious. Obtain medical care at once. 

Murphy, R. J., and W. F. Ashe: Prevention of Heat Illness 
in Football Players, JAMA 194:650-654 (Nov. 8) 1965. 

-National Federation and A.M. A. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1969 



Page Fifteen 



Officials' Ratings on Sportsmanship of K.H.S.A.A. 
Member Schools in Basketball, 1968-1969 



School E 

Adair County 58 

Adairville 44 

Ahrens Trade 40 

Allen County 42 

Anderson County 54 

Annville Institute 29 

Atherton 41 

Auburn 57 

Augusta 61 

Austin Tracy 27 

Ballard Memorial 41 

Barbourville 33 

Bardstown 41 

Bath County 57 

Beechwood 51 

Belfry 46 

Bell County 27 

Bellevue 33 

Benton 41 

Berea Community 28 

Betsy Layne 39 

Bishop Brossart 29 

Bishop David 38 

Bloomfield 42 

Boone County 48 

Bourbon County 51 

Bowling Green 4 5 

Boyd County 29 

Boyle County 40 

Bracken County 53 

Breathitt County 52 

Breckinridge County 55 

Bremen 21 

Bristow 30 

Brodhead 38 

Bryan Station 34 

Buckhorn 15 

Burgin 43 

Burnside 47 

Bush 51 

Butler 40 

Butler County 20 

Caldwell County 30 

Calhoun 25 

Calloway County 21 

Campbell County 44 

Campbellsville 38 

Caneyville 43 

Carlisle County 35 

Carr Creek 5 3 

Carroll County 44 

Carter 2 5 

Casey County 49 

Catlettsburg 38 

Caverna 37 

Central 51 

Central City 41 

Chandler's Chapel 36 

Christian County 51 

Clarkson 28 

Clay County 55 

Clinton County 28 

Combs Memorial 38 

Corbin 39 

Cordia 39 

Covington Catholic 45 

Covington Latin 19 

Crab Orchard 41 

Crittenden County 24 

Cuba 28 

Cub Run 61 

Cumberland 44 

Cumberland County 48 

Danville 5 8 

Daviess County 32 

Dawson Springs 49 



Coach 
G F 



Other School 
Officials 
PEG F P 



Crowd 
G F 



Team 
G G 



Page Sixteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1969 



Dayton 5 3 

Deming 71 

DeSales 40 

Dixie Heights 52 

Dorton 37 

Doss 14 

Drakesboro 54 

duPont Manual 37 

Durrett 42 

Earlington 47 

Eastern 3 8 

East Hardin 49 

Edmonson County 49 

Elizabethtown 53 

Elizabethtown Catholic 41 

Elkhorn City 38 

Eminence 42 

Estill County 62 

Eubank 68 

Evarts 44 

Ezel 40 

Fairdale 42 

Fairview 60 

Fancy Farm 33 

Farmington 37 

Feds Creek 36 

Fern Creek 39 

Flaget 32 

Flaherty 41 

Fleming County 45 

Fleming Neon 35 

Fordsville 39 

Fort Campbell 24 

Fort Knox 2 8 

Frankfort 47 

Franklin 39 

Franklin-Simpson 49 

Frederick Fraize 34 

Fredonia 52 

Fulton 27 

Fulton County 16 

Gallatin County 41 

Gamaliel 2 8 

Garrard County 54 

Garrett 38 

George Rogers Clark 58 

Georgetown 7 2 

Glasgow 49 

Good Shepherd 33 

Graham 46 

Grant County 58 

Greensburg 27 

Greenup 53 

Greenville 50 

Hancock County 48 

Harlan 62 

Harrison County 41 

Harrodsburg 38 

Hart County 53 

Hart Memorial 49 

Hazard 41 

Hazel Green 55 

Hazel Green Academy 61 

Heath 30 

Henderson 43 

Henderson County 34 

Henderson Settlement 28 

Henry Clay 45 

Henry County 37 

Hickman County 28 

Highlands 43 

Hindman 49 

Hiseville 40 

Hitchins 45 

Holmes 44 

Holy Cross 38 

Holy Family 54 

Holy Name 73 

Hopkinsville 47 

Hughes-Kirk 41 

Hustonville 33 

Inez 53 

Iroquois 29 

Irvine 43 

Jackson City 53 

Jackson County 64 

James A. Cawood 58 

Jeffersontown 47 

Jenkins 50 



(Continued in September Issue) 



CAN ATHLETIC INJURIES AND COST 
OF ATHLETIC INSURANCE BE REDUCED? 

HERE ARE SOME SUGGESTIONS THAT WILL HELP: 

1 . Secure a team physician. Your local Medical Society can advise on 



this. 



2. Require players to be physically fit and well conditioned before 
engaging in contact. 

3. Do not allow a player with an injury to participate until he has 
medical approval to do so. 

4. Make sure equipment is adequate, in goofi condition, and that it is 
properly worn. 

5. Consider carefully the length of practice sessions. The latter part 
of lengthy sessions produce the most injuries. 

6. Require injuries to be reported to you promptly and refer those 
needing attention to the physician at once. 

7. Get your players interested in injury prevention and fitness. Any 
player is more valuable without casts and crutches. 

8. Our Cooperative Football Plan and Student Insurance provide 
excellent coverage, service and economy. 



^Ue tCUvcjde+t Gamfuuuf general agent 

W. E. KINGSLEY J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. CHARLES C. PRICE 

Life Department 

121-123 LAFAYETTE AVENUE LEXINGTON, KY. 40502 PHONE 254-4095 

P. O. BOX 7100 



50 YEARS 
FOR ATHLETES 

In August, 1918, our founder, Bill Hunt, was asked to help secure some 
uniforms for a football team so they could tell the spectators from the 
players. 

For 50 years we at Hunt's have tried to serve the athletes by finding for 
them the best available equipment to serve their needs. 

Today we feature and can supply immediate delivery on merchandise for 
any athletic or physical education need from our warehouse. 

We have complete stock of the following items. 

Football Shoes sizes I to 14 

Basketball Shoes sizes 1 to 17 

Football Pants sizes 22 to 52 

Football Jerseys sizes 4 to 50 

Football Shoulder Pads sizes Little League to 50 

Basketball Jerseys sizes 10 to 50 

Basketball Pants sizes Little League to College 

Athletic Socks sizes 6 io 16 

Football Helmets sizes Boys Extra Small to 8 

Football — Rubber or Leather — Little League to Pro 

Basketballs — Indoor or Outdoor — Biddy to Pro 

Fair Play Scoreboards — Grade School to College 

First Aid for prevention or treatment 

We specialize in your problems. 

Next day delivery to any school in Kentucky. 

Call on our experience and service with your problems. 

In Mayfield, 247-1941 COLLECT 

One of us can help you. 



C. A. BYRN, JR. - ROY BOYD - JIM MITCHELL 

EDDIE THOMIS - BILLIE FARMER - JENNY SIMPSON 

ELIZABETH RULE - NANNY LOU USERY - SONDRA POTTS 

HENRY BOMAR 

HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO., Inc. 

CH 7-1941 — PHONES — CH 7-1942 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 







K.H.S.A.A. SCHOOL FOR FOOTBALL OFFICIALS 




Above are area representatives who attended the School for Football Officials, held in Lexington on 
August 8-9. They are: (Left to Right) Front Row-E. B. May, Jr., Prestonsburg; Frank Mercke, Louis- 
ville; Howard Moss, Paducah; Bill Mordica, Ashland; Kean Jenkins, Elizabethtown; Bernard Johnson, 
Lexington. Second Row— Clyde Parsley, Providence; Eli Logan, Hazard; Joe Russell, Russellville; 
School Director Edgar McNabb, Fort Mitchell; Ray Canady, Barbourville; Tom Murray, Fort Mitchell, 
Paul Walker, Bowling Green. 

Official Organ of the 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

September, 1969 



Football Districts and Regions 

The football districts and regions for 1969 and 1970 are 
as follows: 

Class AAA 
Region I 

Atherton, Bishop David, Central, DeSales, duPont Manual, 
Flaget, Iroquois, Male, Shawnee, St. Xavier, Trinity 

Region II 

District 1- 

Butler, Doss, Fairdale, Pleasure Ridge Park, Southern, 
Valley, Western 
District 2- 

Durrett, Eastern, Fern Creek, Jeffersontown, Seneca, 
Thomas Jefferson, Waggener, Westport 

Class AA 
Region I 

District 1- 

Bowling Green, Caldwell County, Christian County, 
Franklin-Simpson, Hopkinsville, Lone Oak, Mayfield, Paducah 
District 2- 

Daviess County, Henderson, Henderson County, Madison- 
ville-North Hopkins, Ohio County, Owensboro, Owensboro 
Catholic, Union County 

Region II 

District 1- 

Breckinridge County, Elizabethtown, Fort Knox, LaRue 
County, Meade County, Nelson County, North Hardin, Old- 
ham County, Shelby County, Shepherdsville 
District 2- 

Danville, Henry Clay, Jessamine County, Lafayette, Som- 
erset, Woodford County 

Region III 

District I- 

Boone County, Boyd County, Campbell County, Coving- 
ton Catholic, Dixie Heights, Highlands, Holmes, Lloyd Memo- 
rial, Newport, Newport Catholic, Paul F. Blazer, Russell, 
Simon Kenton 
District 2- 

Bourbon County. Bryan Station, Franklin County, George 
Rogers Clark. Harrison County, Madison Central, Tates Creek 

Region IV 

District 1- 

Bell County, Corbin, Cumberland, Evarts, James A. Ca- 
wood, Knox Central, Middlesboro, Russell County, Wayne 
County, Whitley County 
District 2- 

Belfry, Hazard, Leslie County, M. C. Napier, Prestonsburg, 
Whitesburg 

Class A 
Region 1 

District 1- 

Crittenden County, Fort Campbell, Fulton, Fulton Coun- 
ty, Murray, North Marshall, Russellville, Todd Central, Trigg 
County 
District 2- 

Allen County, Butler County, Campbellsville, Caverna, 
Cumberland County, Glasgow, Greensburg, Metcalfe County, 
Tompkinsville, Warren Central, Warren East 

Region II 

District 1- 

Bardstown, Eminence, Henry County, Kentucky Military 
Institute, Lebanon, Louisville Country Day, Shelbyville, 
Washington County 
District 2- 

Anderson, Berea, Boyle County, Burgin, Frankfort, Gar- 
rard County, Georgetown, Harrodsburg, Kentucky School 
for the Deaf, Madison, Mercer County, Sayre, Scott County, 
Stanford 

Region III 

District 1- 

Beechwood, Bellevue, Carroll County, Catlettsburg, Day- 
ton, Ludlow, McKell, Owen County, Raceland, Wurtland 
District 2- 

Bath County, Fleming County, Lewis County, Maysville, 
Millersburg Military Institute, Montgomery County, Morgan 
County, Mt. Sterling, Nicholas County, Paris, Rowan County 



Region IV 

District 1- 

Harlan, Hazel Green, Lily, London, Lynch, Lynn Camp, 
Mt. Vernon, Pineville, Williamsburg 
District 2- 

Elkhorn City, Fleming-Neon, Jenkins, Johns Creek, Lou- 
isa, Morgan County, Mullins, Paintsville, Pikeville, Virgie, 
Wheelwright 

FILMS 

The films listed below are in the Film Library of the 
University of Kentucky College of Education. The code 
letters, "e, j, s, c, a," refer to elementary, junior high, senior 
high, college and adult audiences who may enjoy the particu- 
lar film listed. The rental prices shown do not apply to schools 
which use one of the special subscription service plans offered 
by the Bureau of Audio-Visual Material. 

Football 

BALL HANDLING IN FOOTBALL, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $2.00. 

Fundamentals of ball handling are stressed; stance, grip, 
"feel" of the ball, fingertip control adjustment before throw- 
ing or kicking, receiving passes from center or from a back, 
catching passes and punts, ways of carrying ball, and changing 
from one hand to another. Game shots are presented, using 
slow motion and stop action techniques, and superimposed 
animation to illustrate principles. 

BLOCKING IN FOOTBALL, j-s-c, 1 reel, $2.00. 

Fundamentals of good blocking are taught in this film; 
position, speed, drive, follow-through, timing, and body con- 
trol. Describes shoulder and body blocks, demonstrating 
several varieties of these. Importance of good physical condi- 
tion, practice, and experience are emphasized. Special photog- 
raphy used to illustrate different points. 

FOOTBALL BY THE RULES, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, (30 min.), 
color, $1.00. 

The film will give the viewer a better understanding and a 
keener appreciation of football. Modern photography pre- 
sents many play situations that portray the guidelines used by 
officials in making judgment decisions so necessary in this 
sport. 

KNOW YOUR FOOTBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels (30 min.), color, 
$1.00. 

Gives a visual approach to the written rules. Play situations 
challenge the viewer's knowledge and clarify many rules 
interpretations. Recommended for fans, officials, coaches and 
players. 

TACKLING IN FOOTBALL, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $2.00. 

Tackling properly is shown as the result of application of 
certain fundamentals: good physical condition, speed, body 
placement, drive, sure grip, timing, and body control. Shoul- 
der and cross body tackles are demonstrated in various ways, 
with special instructions for safety and means of reducing 
shock. 

THIS IS FOOTBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, $1.00. 

Centered around the four S's-science, speed, skill and 
safety. Demonstrations cover basic rules that will aid the 
official, coach, players, and fan. Play situations are used to 
establish standards. 

Disqualification Cards 

Each official registered with the Association has been sent 
a supply of cards to be used following the disqualifications of 
players from athletic contests. Although By-Law 7-2 provides 
that the official shall report the name of a disqualified player 
to the principal of the school which the player attends or to 
his representative, it is suggested that a disqualification card 
also be mailed to the Commissioner. This should be done 
immediately following the contest. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL XXXII-No. 2 



SEPTEMBER, 1969 



$1.00 Per Year 




Ralph C. Dorsey 
President 



Foster J. Sanders 
Vice-President 



Supt. Ralph C. Dorsey of the Caverna Independent School 
District was elected President of the Board of Control at the 
summer meeting of the directors, held on August 16, 1969. 
Prin. Foster J. Sanders of the Louisville Male High SchooJ 
was elected Board Vice-President. Each of the men is in his 
eighth year of Board membership. 

Ralph C. Dorsey was born in Scottsville but has lived 
most of his life in Horse Cave. He graduated from Horse Cave 
High School in 1935, later attending Indiana University on a 
basketball scholarship and receiving his B.S. degree with a 
major in Physical Education. 

After serving in the United States Army during World War 

11, Capt. Dorsey returned to his home town and served as a 
teacher and coach for four years. During this time he attended 
summer school at Western Kentucky State College and re- 
ceived his M.A. degree. During the 1950-54 period he served 
as a 12-grade principal, and as basketball and baseball coach 
for the Caverna High School. For the past fifteen years he has 
been Superintendent of the Caverna School District. 

Twice an all-state basketball player, Ralph C. Dorsey 
received varsity basketball letters for three years at Indiana 
University, being a member of the 1940 NCAA champion- 
ship team. He took his Caverna basketball team to the state 
tournament twice, his baseball team to the state tournament 
three times. His baseball team was state champion in 1961. 

Mr. Dorsey is an active member of the Horse Cave Meth- 
odist Church where he has served as Church School Superin- 
tendent, teacher and church lay leader. He is currently 
chairman of the church official board. He belongs to the 
various educational associations at the local, state and national 
levels. He serves actively in the Rotary Club and the Chamber 
of Commerce. He has been honored as "Man of the year" by 
the Horse Cave Chamber of Commerce. He is a member of 
the Caverna Memorial Hospital Board of Directors. For the 
past nineteen years he has been secretary-treasurer of the 
Southern Kentucky Athletic Conference. He was President 
of the Kentucky Coaches Association in 1962-63. 

Foster J. Sanders, son of a Methodist minister, was born 
in Summersville, Kentucky, in Green County, on December 

12, 1914. A graduate of the Beaver Dam High School, he 
received his A.B. degree from Kentucky Wesleyan College 
and his M.A. from the George Peabody College. 



From 1936 to 1941 Mr. Sanders coached and taught at 
the Shepherdsville High School. From 1941 to 1943 he was a 
Safety Director for the Gopher Ordnance Works at Minne- 
apolis, Minnesota. During 1945-46 Mr. Sanders was the Prin- 
cipal of the Shepherdsville High School, and during the period 
of 1946-55 he was a teacher of Social Studies at the Western 
Junior High School in Louisville. During the next six years 
he was Principal of the Western Junior High School, and in 
1961 he was named Principal of the Louisville Male High 
School. 

In 1936 Foster J. Sanders was listed in "Who's Who in 
Colleges and Universities." In 1955 he was awarded a Travel 
Fellowship by the Ford Foundation, but he declined this to 
accept the principalship of the Western Junior High School. 
He is a former member of the Kentucky Committee 
of the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools, currently a member of Phi Delta Kappa National 
Educational Fraternity, the Masonic Lodge and the Board of 
Trustees of the Cooper Memorial Methodist Church. He is 
charge lay leader at the church. 

Mr. Sanders is married to the former Jane McConnell of 
Marion, Kentucky, an elementary supervisor in the Jefferson 
County school system. They have two children, a daughter, 
Barbara Longacre, and a son, Jerry, a student at Vanderbilt 
Medical School. . 

New Regulations 

During the 1968-69 school year, numerous amendments 
were written into K.H.S.A.A. regulations by the Delegate 
Assembly and the Board of Control. Some of the most 
significant of these were: 

1. A contestant becomes ineligible on his nineteenth 
birthday with certain exceptions (By-Law 4). 

2. A player ruled out of a contest is desqualified from 
athletic competition until reinstated by the Commissioner. 
The name of the player is reported to the principal of the 
school which the player attends or to his representative (By- 
Law 7-2) 

3. Baseball coaches are now required to attend clinics 
(By-Law 29-3) 

4. The use of registered officials in baseball is required 
(By-Law 22). 

5. Weight classes in Wrestling have been changed (Region- 
al Wrestling Rule VII). 

6. Regional Track Rule VIII has been liberalized. 

7. Football Rule II-B and II-C should be studied for 
important changes. 

8. In football playoff games, other than the final cham- 
pionship game in each class, a new method of playing off ties 
has been devised. A complete description of this method is 
given in Football Rule III-D (1969-70 booklet). 

Attention, Principals! 

A list of registered football officials appears in this issue 
of the ATHLETE. Principals and coaches should study the 
current list to determine whether or not all officials with 
whom contracts have been signed have registered this fall. 
Supplementary lists of officials will appear in subsequent 
issues of the magazine. By-Law 22 provides that member 
schools shall use registered officials in all football, basketball 
and baseball games, and that failure to comply with this 
regulation makes the home school liable for suspension. If 
there is any question about registration, the official should 
be asked to present his card. 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER 1969 



SEPTEMBER, 1969 



VOL. XXXH-NO. 2 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 40S01 

Second class postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Ralph C. Dorsey (1966-70) Horse Cave 

Vice-President .... Foster J. Sanders (1966-70), Louisville 
Directors-Morton Combs (1968-72), Carr Creek; W. H. Crow- 
dus (1968-71), Franklin; Don Davis (1967-71), Independ- 
ence; James T. Dotson (1968-72), Johns Creek; Lee T. Mills 
(1969-73), Frankfort. 

Subscription Rate $1.00 per Year 

Jt\om the Commissioned s CJffice 

Attention, Officials! 

The attention of all registered K.H.S.A.A. football, basket- 
ball and baseball officials is called to By-Law 29, Section 9, 
which provides that the officials shall be supplied with an 
emblem which he shall wear on his shirt or sweater. This ruge 
will be enforced strictly in 1969-70 as it has been in recent 
years. The emblem is to be worn on the left shoulder shirt 
sleeve approximately one and one-half inches below the 
shoulder seam. The Approved or Certified bar should be worn 
below the emblem. Failure to wear the emblem will make an 
official liable for suspension from the Officials' Division of 
the Association. 

Recommended uniforms are as follows: 

Football-black and white striped shirt (long or short 
sleeves), black baseball cap with white piping, white knee 
pants, black belt, black stockings, black shoes and laces; 

Basketball-black and white striped shirt (short sleeves, 
long sleeves by special permission), black trousers, black belt, 
black shoes and laces; 

Baseball-navy blue or black trousers, black athletic 
leather shoes (not football shoes), navy blue coat or jacket, 
navy blue shirt if working coatless, white shirt if wearing 
coat or jacket, white shirt on bases if all base umpires are 
dressed the same, umpire's navy cap (no player caps), indica- 
tor and mask of choice, inner protector or inflated protector 
(inflated type if official desires to purchase), black belt, black 
shoe laces, black tie with white shirt. 

Basketball Clinics 

The 1969-70 rules meetings for basketball officials and 
coaches will be conducted this year by K.H.S.A.A. regional 
representatives. These men, most of them veteran officials in 
their respective areas, met in the Twenty-first Annual School 
for Basketball Officials, held in Lexington on August 10-11, 
1969. 

The clinics will be held all over the state on two dates, 
September 21 and September 28. The hour is 2:00 P.M. 
An official or coach may attend any one of the clinics to 
comply with the provisions of K.H.S.A.A. By-Law 29-3. 

The dates and sites of the clinics are as follows: 

September 21-Mayfield High School, Hopkinsville High 
School, Daviess County High School, Bowling Green (Reser- 
voir Hill, Rec. Center), Elizabethtown High School, Louisville 
(Kentucky Hotel), Shelby County High School, Newport High 
School, Mason County High School, Lexington (Transylvania 
College), Danville High School, Bell County High School, 
Hazard High School, Pikeville High School, Paul G. Blazer 
High School 



September 28-PaducahTilghmanHigh School, Henderson 
High School, Leitchfield High School, Bowling Green (Res- 
ervoir Hill, Rec. Center), Campbellsville High School, Louis- 
ville (Kentucky Hotel), Carroll County High School, Newport 
High School, Clark County High School, Berea College, 
Somerset High School, Whitley County High School, Whites- 
burg High School, Prestonsburg High School, Morehead State 
University 

Minutes of Board Meeting 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association met at Kenlake Hotel, Kentucky Lake 
State Park, on Saturday morning, August 16, 1969. The 
meeting was called to order by retiring President Preston 
Holland at 9:30. Present were Board members Morton 
Combs, W. H. Crowdus, Don Davis, Ralph C. Dorsey, Tom 
Mills, and Foster J. Sanders; Commissioner Theo. A. Sanford, 
Assistant Commissioner J. B. Mansfield, and former Board 
member Don R. Rawlings. The invocation was given by Mr. 
' Rawlings. 

W. H. Crowdus moved, seconded by Foster J. Sanders, 
that the reading of the June 7th meeting be waived, since the 
-members of the Board had received copies of these minutes. 
The motion was carried unanimously. 

Messrs. Holland and Rawlings made appropriate remarks 
of appreciation concerning their eight-year tenure on the 
Board of Control, pledging their continued support to the 
expanding program of the Association. 

President Holland stated that the next order of business 
was the election of President and Vice-President of the 
Board. W. H. Crowdus moved, seconded by Don Davis, 
that Ralph C. Dorsey and Foster J. Sanders be elected 
President and Vice-President of the Board of Control 
respectively by acclamation. The motion was carried, with 
Messrs. Dorsey and Sanders not voting. 

In accepting the presidency of the Board, Mr. Dorsey 
pledged to do his best in continuing and improving the 
program of the K.H.S.A.A. He welcomed new Board member 
Tom Mills. Mr. Mills expressed his pleasure at being a member 
of the Board, and upon request gave the Board information 
concerning his teaching, coaching, and administrative experi- 
ence. 

President Dorsey announced the personnel of the Building, 
Trophy, Retirement, and Personnel and Policy committees, 
stating that the members of the Swimming, Wrestling, and 
Gymnastics committees would be announced later after the 
availability of the committee members has been determined 
by the Commissioner. 

The Commissioner made a report on Association receipts 
and disbursements during the 1968-69 year. Copies of the 
audit, recently prepared by Huet L. Johnson of Louisville, 
Certified Public Accountant, had been mailed to the members 
of the Board. Don Davis moved, seconded by Foster J. 
Sanders, that the financial report presented by the Commis- 
sioner be accepted. The motion was carried unanimously. 

Morton Combs moved, seconded by W. H. Crowdus, that 
the fall meeting of the Board be held in Lexington on Septem- 
ber 27. The motion was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner read a letter from Mr. Robert G. 
Fiser, who had been elected to Board membership to repre- 
sent Section 1 for the 1969-73 period, in which he tendered 
his resignation due to the fact he had accepted an administra- 
tive position in Illinois. The Commissioner stated that, after 
a conference with the President, he had sent a bulletin to 
each K.H.S.A.A. member school principal in Section 1, 
asking for nominations for the vacant position now existing 
on the Board. The nominations are to be in the hands of the 
Commissioner not later than August 25, and the deadline for 
returning the ballots is to be September 10. 

The Commissioner reported that the Personnel and Policy 
Committee, acting under delegated authority given by the 
Board of Control in its June 7th meeting, had employed 
Billy V. Wise as an Assistant Commissioner at the annual 
salary of $12,000.00. Morton Combs moved, seconded by 
Tom Mills, that the action of the Personnel and Policy 

(Continued on Page Seven) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER 1969 



Page Three 



Officials' Ratings on Sportsmanship of K.H.S.A.A. 
Member Schools in Basketball 1968-1969 



School E 

Jessamine County 43 

Johns Creek 47 

Johnson Central 58 

Kentucky School for the Deaf ... 38 

Knott County 36 

Knox Central 41 

Lafayette 31 

LaRue County 33 

Leatherwood 32 

Lebanon 48 

Lebanon Junction 41 

Lee County 43 

Leitchfield 44 

Leslie County 30 

Letcher 45 

Lewisburg 39 

Lewis County 58 

Lexington Catholic 47 

Lily 31 

Lincoln School 13 

Livermore 27 

Livingston 52 

Livingston Central 31 

Lloyd 42 

London 50 

Lone Jack 44 

Lone Oak 40 

Louisa 34 

Louisville Country Day 32 

Louisville Male 23 

Lowes 22 

Ludlow 21 

Lynch 46 

Lynn Camp 23 

Lyon County 44 

McCreary County 49 

McDowell 43 

McKell 37 

McKinney 29 

Madison 57 

Madison Central 39 

Madisonville-North Hopkins ... 25 

Martin 47 

Mason County 59 

Mayfield 48 

Maysville 53 

May town 55 

M. C. Napier 27 

Meade County 39 

Memorial 40 

Menifee County 56 

Mercer County 39 

Metcalfe County 39 

Middlesboro 44 

Millard 65 

Millersburg Military Institute ... 48 

Model 13 

Montgomery County 55 

Monticello 51 

Morgan County 48 

Mt. Sterling 48 

Mt. Vernon 41 

Mt. Washington 47 

Muhlenberg Central 44 

Mullins 59 

Murray 38 

Murray University 21 

Nancy 55 

Newport 45 

Newport Catholic 31 

Nicholas County 62 

North Hardin 42 

North Marshall 44 



(Continued from August ATHLETE) 

Other School 
Coach Officials 

GF PEG FPE 



Crowd 



Team 
G G 



18 


1 





38 


13 


1 


2 


3 5 


15 


3 





30 


14 


2 


1 


50 


8 





4 


44 


21 








45 


18 


5 


1 


58 


8 


1 





32 


13 





1 


45 


12 


1 


1 


43 


6 





4 


61 



2 


1 


58 


5 








44 


2 


3 





51 


6 





1 


50 


8 


1 





48 


7 



9 


3 





52 


14 


2 


4 





33 


10 


6 








61 


5 








1 


40 


10 


6 





3 


45 


18 



46 


17 


2 





44 


20 


1 





39 


12 


1 


1 


42 


10 


1 





33 


27 


4 





39 


23 


2 


1 


44 


21 


2 


1 


47 


19 


2 





23 


13 


2 


1 


25 


12 


1 


1 



10 


3 


4 


59 


7 





3 


42 


20 


3 


4 


46 


15 


5 


3 


10 


9 


4 


36 


16 


1 


1 


30 


20 


3 


1 


31 


20 


1 


2 


19 


4 


4 


51 


14 





4 


35 


29 


2 


3 


41 


22 


3 


i 


10 


3 


1 


51 


12 


1 





48 


13 


2 


1 


47 


13 


3 


1 


7 


2 





45 


6 


2 





41 


11 


1 





40 


9 


4 





10 


1 





44 


7 








38 


9 


4 





42 


9 








12 


2 





33 


14 


1 





27 


17 


4 





29 


17 


2 





10 


1 





32 


11 








26 


16 


1 





28 


12 


3 





17 


8 


11 


36 


16 


3 


4 


31 


17 


6 


5 


32 


20 


4 


3 


26 


4 


2 


29 


25 








23 


26 


4 


1 


22 


27 


4 


1 


25 


10 


16 


44 


22 


2 


4 


18 


40 


10 


4 


19 


39 


9 


5 


8 


5 





44 


8 


4 





30 


20 


8 


1 


37 


17 


5 





9 


3 


1 


26 


10 








18 


16 


2 





17 


12 


6 


1 


7 


3 





37 


16 





1 


31 


18 


3 


2 


29 


18 


6 


1 


19 


1 





62 


6 








48 


10 


11 





63 


5 


1 





11 








46 


6 








39 


13 


2 





42 


10 


1 


1 


9 


8 


1 


44 


9 


1 


1 


35 


14 


5 


1 


31 


16 


7 


1 


16 


2 


2 


41 


6 


2 





31 


6 





2 


32 


14 


2 


1 


1 





1 


58 





1 





57 


2 








58 


1 








18 


5 


4 


60 


6 








53 


9 


4 





50 


8 


6 


2 


19 


6 


1 


33 


15 


3 





22 


24 


3 


2 


26 


21 


4 





6 


1 


1 


47 


6 


1 





45 


9 


1 





48 


7 








10 


3 


4 


63 


12 


1 





49 


17 


9 


1 


59 


14 


2 


1 


17 








49 


16 








44 


19 


2 





46 


16 


3 





16 


1 


3 


63 


8 


1 


1 


45 


23 


3 


2 


45 


24 


3 


1 


7 


3 


1 


50 


12 


2 





38 


18 


5 


3 


51 


11 


3 


1 


15 





2 


31 


12 








25 


15 


2 


2 


26 


16 


2 





7 


1 


2 


41 


7 





1 


32 


16 


1 





31 


18 








14 


1 





41 


14 








36 


17 


2 





37 


16 


2 





8 


2 


4 


59 


6 


3 


2 


53 


12 


2 


2 


55 


10 


2 


2 


14 





3 


49 


7 








40 


14 


2 





41 


13 


2 





a 


1 


2 


42 


8 








33 


14 


1 


2 


40 


8 


2 


1 


4 


2 





44 


4 


2 





37 


10 


3 





36 


11 


2 


1 


18 


1 





70 


12 


2 





59 


25 








62 


20 


2 





6 


1 





51 


4 








51 


4 








44 


4 


5 


2 



1 





50 


6 


1 





3 





36 


21 


1 





1 


1 


44 


11 








9 


7 


36 


18 


8 


1 


3 


3 


53 


17 


2 





1 


1 


37 


12 





2 








21 


7 














49 


15 


1 





1 





43 


23 


1 






Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER 1969 



North Warren 32 

Oakdale Christian 9 

Ohio County 36 

Old Kentucky Home 49 

Oldham County 39 

Olive Hill 75 

Olmstead 47 

Oneida Institute 46 

Owen County 36 

Owensboro 45 

Owensboro Catholic 47 

Owsley County 26 

Paducah Tilghman 47 

Paintsville 45 

Paris 59 

Park City 40 

Paul G. Blazer 66 

Pendleton County 73 

Phelps 44 

Pikeville 37 

Pine Knot 40 

Pineville 33 

Pleasure Ridge Park 25 

Portland Christian 25 

Powell County 42 

Prestonsburg 34 

Prichard 46 

Providence 45 

Pulaski County 35 

Raceland 39 

Red Bird 25 

Reidland 30 

Richardsville 23 

Riverside Christian 45 

Rowan County 30 

Russell 45 

Russell County 54 

Russellville 19 

Sacramento 28 

St. Augustine 34 

St. Camillus Academy 1 

St. Catherine 43 

St. Charles 34 

St. Henry 58 

St. Mary 46 

St. Patrick 63 

St. Romuald 45 

St. Thomas 59 

St. Thomas Seminary 16 

St. Xavier 58 

Salyersville 34 

Sandy Hook 60 

Sayre 42 

Scott County 51 

Scottsville 52 

Sedalia 37 

Seneca 33 

Shawnee 41 

Shelby County 44 

Shelbyville 45 

Shepherdsville 43 

Shopville 45 

Silver Grove 44 

Simon Kenton 42 

Somerset 24 

Southern 46 

South Hopkins 26 

South Marshall 30 

Stanford 46 

Symsonia 29 

Tates Creek 37 

Taylor County 45 

Taylorsville 46 

Temple Hill 36 

Thomas Jefferson 41 

Todd Central 47 

Tollesboro 61 

Tompkinsville 41 

Trigg County 47 

Trimble County 56 

Trinity (Louisville) 36 

Trinity (Whitesville) 54 

Union County 48 

University Breckinridge 40 

University High 48 

Valley 49 

Virgie 39 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER i969 



Page Five 



Waggener 40 

Walton-Verona 64 

Warfield 40 

Warren Central 35 

Washington County 43 

Wayland 40 

Wayne County 36 

Webster County 60 

Western (Louisville) 33 

Western (Sinai) 51 

West Hardin 57 

West Hopkins 51 

Westport 29 

Wheelwright 29 

Whitesburg 38 

Whitley County 44 

Williamsburg 40 

Williamstown 60 

Wingo 17 

Wolfe County 52 

Woodford County 43 

Wurtland 36 



43 



32 19 10 



38 25 



39 30 



Schools' Ratings on 
Basketball Officials 

The following ratings were received on basketball officials 
registered with the K.H.S.A.A. during 1968-69. The numbers 
following each name respectively represent the numbers of 
Excellent, Good, Fair, and Poor ratings given to the official. 

Abney, Bob, 1-5-0-0; Adams, Richard W., 2-1-0-1; Adams, 
William M., 1-1-0-0; Alexander, Howard, 0-10-6-3; Alexander, 
Rex E., 18-26-6-2; Allen, James D., 6-3-1-0; Allen, James 
Franklin, 0-0-2-0; Allen, J. Mack, 0-0-2-3; Allen, Nelson Rob- 
ert, 20-25-2^; Allen, Thomas, 0-0-1-0; Allen, Willard, 2-9-0-1 ; 
Allen, Yvon, 0-9-3-1 ; Allgood, Russell, 8-11-2-4; Amos, Jerry, 
0-2-0-0; Anders, Raleigh A., 3-7-3-0; Archibald, Larry T., 
1-3-4-0; Atwell, Darryl R., 1-3-0-0 

Baker, Billy B., 1-0-3-2; Baker, Robert M., 1-10-3-0; Balla- 
ban, Tom, 2-4-0-0; Bankemper, Thomas, 0-10-2-0; Barker, 
Bob R., 0-3-0-0; Barker, Walter D., 2-7-3-2; Barnette, Jerry, 
0-0-1-0; Bates, Bob, 2-2-1-1; Beam, Joseph F., 3-2-5-1; Bell, 
Clarence T., 9-13-5-1; Bennett, Gene, 2-4-0-0; Benzinger, 
Joseph, 2-7-1-1; Bertsch, Ronald L., 2-2-0-1; Bienick, Stan, 
1-0-1-0; Bishop, Heulyn, 8-4-2-0; Biter, Charles D., 0-0-4-1; 
Black, Willis L., 1-0-0-1; Blackwood, Thomas, 16-21-4-3; 
Blair, Ivan, 1-0-0-0; Blazier, Bea, 0-1-0-0; Bleidt, John J., 
2-3-0-0; Blevins, Boone, Jr., 4-14-8-7; Bley, Richard V., 
0-0-0-1; Blount, Richard E., 0-2-0-0; Bollam, Kenneth A., 
0-2-0-1, Bowling, Avery, 0-0-1-3; Bowling, Roy, 7-16-1-1; 
Boyles, Paul, 11-14-2-1; Bradford, Bob, 1-0-1-0; Brannon, 
William Russell, 1-1-0-0; Branstetter, Elwood, 1-1-1-0; Brandt, 
Bernard, 1-6-3-0; Brashear, Loy Ray, 23-33-6-2; Brashears, 
Malcolm W., 0-0-0-1; Brauch, Charles J., 1-0-1-1; Brewer, J. 
Kenneth, 0-1-0-0; Bridges, Ralph, 1-4-0-0; Brizendine, Vic, 
6-7-2-1; Brock, Alben, 23-16-1-2; Brock, John D., 3-4-3-0; 
Brock, John H., 12-6-0-0; Brown, Billy C, 2-1-0-0; Brown, 
E. C, 9-20-3-1; Brown, J. W. "Scoop," 22-24-2-1; Browning, 
Earl E., 11-15-5-1; Bruner, Jack C, 0-4-0-0; Buis, Nathaniel, 
4-17-2-4; Bunnell, Rouseau, 0-4-0-0; Burch, B. W., 15-14-5-1; 
Burchett, Dwight, 0-0-0-1; Burd, Robert T., 2-0-0-0; Burke, 
Harry R., 30-24-2-0; Burkhart, James G., 1-8-2-0; Burnett, 
Duke Gerald, 9-26-2-1; Butcher, Douglas, 18-26-3-4; Butcher, 
Granville "Bo," 15-25-4-3; Butcher, Stephen, 1-1-0-0; Butler, 
Jack K., 1-0-0-0; Butler, Robert, 8-15-13-2; Butner, Billy M., 
7-40-5-0; Byron, Lou, Jr., 1-3-1-0 

Cain, William Ronald, 0-1-1-0; Caldwell, James, 17-27-3-0; 
Calitri, Don, 3-7-0-1 ; Callahan, Thomas J., 2-6-3-0; Campbell, 
George H., 0-1-1-0; Campbell, John, Jr., 5-11-2-0; Canady, 
Ray B., 2-5-1-1; Cantrell, Hubert E., 0-3-1-0; Caple, Harold 
E., 8-9-0-0; Carlberg, John H., 14-24-5-3; Carlberg Ralph C, 
3-5-2-1; Carr, Billy Wilson, 3-5-2-0; Carter, Jack Thomas 
0-5-0-1; Cash, Charles C, 1-5-0-1; Cates, Billy C, 0-3-1-0; 
Cecil, Donnie, 1-7-0-1; Chambers, Virgil, 6-10-1-0; Cisco, 
Robert N., 5-14-0-1; Clardy, Barry D., 0-0-2-3; Clark, Robert 
L., 1-6-2-0.; Clark, Tom, 4-9-1-0; Clater, James F., 0-3-3-0; 
Cleavenger, Ed, 6-17-2-0; Clemmons, Sam, 6-7-5-2; Cobb, 
Charles E., 0-3-1-2; Cochran, Ray Delano, 2-0-3-0; Cochran, 
Roy H., Jr., 3-8-3-0; Coffey, Marion L., 0-3-0-1 ; Coffey, Rob- 
ert A., 3-7-6-0; Coleman, Daniel L., 1-4-2-1 ; Coleman, James 
E., 0-1-0-0; Colley, Lynn W., 8-23-1-1; Collier, Burnard, 



4-16-2-0; Collins, Hubert, 16-19-3-0; Colvin, Jack, 0-1-0-0; 
Combs, Keith A., 8-22-3-0; Combs, Eugene W. 2-6-1-1; Con- 
ley, Connie B., 5-7-1-3; Conley, Ted, 5-21-7-3; Conn, Delano, 
1-0-0-0; Cooksey, Marvin, 2-22-5-2; Copley, Sidney M., 
0-12-0-0; Cotton, Carl W., 1-2-0-2; Cox, Alva Johnny, 2-7-2-0; 
Cox, Collin Kelly, 6-3-0-0; Cox, Cortland, 7-5-2-2; Cox, Ru- 
fus, 6-12-2-1; Coy, Charlie S., 0-1-0-0; Crager, Bobby F., 
12-4-0-0; Cravens, Richard F., 3-6-0-5; Cravens, Robert L., 
6-22-9-6; Crawford, W. Gordon, 0-2-1-0; Crisp, Don E., 
2-3-2-2; Croft, Lewis, 11-26-4-0; Cullum, Harold D., 0-3-0-0; 
Culp, Ronald D., 4-5-4-0; Culp, Willard E., 1-7-4-2, Cummins, 
Ray, 1-1-0-1; Cunningham, Bill, 0-0-1-0; Curtis, Douglas E., 
1-3-0-0 

Dalton, John P., 0-1-1-0; Dame, L. J., 3-18-13-1 ; Daniels, 
Robert A., 12-14-3-0; Daniel, Roger T., 5-7-4-1 ; Dann, Nick, 
18-14-0-0; Davenport, Bowman, 8-9-0-0; Davis, Archie Charles, 
1-0-0-0; Davis, Harold T., 9-10-5-2; Davis, Ralph E. St., 
12-14-3-0; Dawson, Alby Lewis, 0-1-0-0; Day, Bill, 5-25-1-1; 
Day, Charles R., 1-2-0-0, Day, Jack L., S-4-2-0; Dean, Jerry 
W., 0-2-2-0; Dennedy, Bob, 2-1-1-1; DeVary, Bill, 20-13-6-1; 
Dickison, Ruddie L., 2-0-1-0; Dieterle, Owen M., 0-4-0-0; 
Disken, Jim, 8-3-2-0; Divine, Wayne L., 3-5-3-0; Dixon, Billy 
M., 4-6-10-2; Dixon, Ronald R., 1-0-0-2; Dobson, Kenneth, 
3-7-2-0; Dockery, Don, 0-1-1-0; Dorsey, James, 6-18-5-3; Dot- 
son, John B., 1-0-1-1; Downs, Joseph W., 2-6-6-0; Drake, 
Richard R., 6-26-3-1; Driskell, Earl, Jr., 16-24-3-0; Duerson, 
William Robert, 10-36-3-2; Duff, Birchell, 6-6-2-1; Duff, Earl, 
5-7-1-0; Duggins, Michael, 0-3-2-0; Dunagan, Leon, 1-0-1-0; 
Duncil, Charles, 1-2-1-0; Durbin, Hade, Jr. 1 6-20-4-3; Durbin, 
Roy, 9-12-2-1; Duvall, Thomas Jay, 16-26-6-5; Dyke, Orville 
Dean, 4-11-3-1 

Eades, James M., 6-24-5-5; Edgington, Fred, 0-1-0-0; Ed- 
wards, Hugh Richard, 0-9-2-1; Ellington, James E., 0-5-3-1; 
Elliott, Carroll L., 18-19-5-5; Ellis, Johnny, 1-1-1-0; Elmore, 
Jimmy A., 18-18-2-3; Emery, George, 0-2-0-0 

Farley, Jimmy, 5-6-6-4; Farmer, Billie, 1-2-0-0; Farmer, 
Jack, 3-2-0-0; Feix, Al, 2-2-0-0; Feltner, Ralph, Jr., 0-3-2-0, 
Ferguson, Thomas L., 3-0-0-0; Fields, Rufus, 0-2-2-0; Finley, 
Albert R., 14-37-8-3; Fish, Leland Gilbert, 3-6-3-1 ; Fletcher, 
John, 0-1-0-0; Flinchum, Paul, 0-1-2-0; Flowers, Randal B., 
1-4-4-2; Flynn, Robert D., 20-11-1-0; Foster, Berryman E., 
1-3-1-0; Foster, Bob, 26-19-1-3; Fraley, Bill, 0-9-5-1; Fraley, 
Joe, 0-1-1-0; Francis, William L., 0-1-0-0; Freese, Ollie, 
1-6-5-2; Freppon, Tom, 4-15-1-0; Frey, William R., 0-1-0-0; 
Fritz, Sherman, 25-30-4-6; Fulkerson, James R., 0-1-0-0; 
Fuller, Dick, 0-1-0-0; Fuller, John R., 5-6-4-1 

Gabbard, John B., 1-9-1-0; Gaines, Harvey, 3-3-0-0; 
Gaither, Gene, 12-35-4-2; Galuk, Walter M., 0-4-0-0; Gamble, 
Jerry, 1-1-0-1; Gardner, Gary, 0-1-1-0; Gardner, Howard, 
5^1-1-1; Gentry, Bobby Gene, 0-2-1-0; Gentry, Dale J., 
9-9-5-0; Gettler, John F., 0-6-4-3; Gibbs, C. Richard, 0-5-0-0; 
Gibson, Carl, 1-1-1-0; Gibson, Fred, 2-4-0-1; Gilbert, Cebert, 
Jr., 1-0-0-1; Gilbert, Gerald L., 47-38-4-0; Gilman, Ronald, 
0-3-1-1; Goebel, N. Glenn, 1-2-0-2; Goff, Reathel, 2-7-1-0; 
Goins, Edgar S., 9-26-2-0; Goins, Homer, 2-0-1-0; Golden, 
Billy Joe, 34-31-1-0; Goldey, William H., 0-1-0-0; Goley, Jim, 
10-19-5-1; Goodin, Shirley G., 0-1-1-0; Goodman, Jack, 
33-18-4-1; Goodman, Richard, 0-2-1-1; Gordon, Levi J., 
0-1-0-1; Gordon, Ronald F., 0-0-0-1; Gour, Bob, 14-18-6-5; 
Gover, Luid J., 2-23-6-2; Grace, Charles K., 0-1-1-0; Grace, 
Hickory, 0-4-1-0; Graham, Jim, 0-1-0-0; Gray, Raymond, 
0-13-4-1; Green, Donald, 1-4-0-1 ; Grigsby, Pete, Jr., 7-10-0-0; 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER 1969 



Grooms, Roger C, 1-2-0-0; Grunkemeyer, Michael, 0-0-2-0; 
Gustafson, Al "Gus," 14-17-10-0 

Halbert, Hubert, 1-0-0-0; Hall, Jack R., 3-7-1-0; Hall, 
Tommy D., 7-1-1-0; Hall, William W., 23-7-1-1; Ham, Ron- 
ald, 1-4-2-1; Hamilton, Walter F., 1-6-1-0; Hamm, Gerald, 
10-27-8-9; Hamm, Harold D., 0-9-1-0; Hammock, Don L., 
4-10-8-3; Hammons, J. S., 1-0-0-0; Hammons, Norman, 
20-33-9-4; Hancock, Norb, 4-19-4-1; Haney, Raymond, 
5-6-5-3; Hardin, Don G., 24-21-3-1; Hargis, Keith Noel, 
2-10-4-0; Harjo, Amos A., 0-5-0-0; Harned, Vic, 36-18-2-0; 
Harper, Randall H., 10-8-3-4; Harper, Robie. 15-6-0-0; 
Harris, Billy, 10-22-2-1; Harris, Larry R., 1-2-0-0; Harris 
Richard H., 3-1-0-0; Harris, Wayne, 4-16-4-1; Harrison, 
Danny, 0-4-0-0; Harrison, John L., 28-20-0-1; Hatfield, 
Cecil, 5-12-0-0; Hawkins, Don, 11-6-1-1; Hayden, John O., 
1-2-1-0; Hayden, Samuel J., 0-12-0-3; Hayes, James V., 
4-0-1-0; Heath, Robert, 0-1-0-0; Heinichen, Carl C, 0-1-0-1; 
Heldman, John, Jr., 1-0-0-0; Hensley, Spencer D., 0-0-1-0; 
Henson, Tony C, 4-3-2-1; Hess, Charles Robert, 3-0-0-1; 
Hewitt, R. T., 17-19-5-2; Hicks, Harold Dane, 5-4-2-0; Hig- 
gins, Bob, 1-1-0-0; Hill, Earl F., 15-20-5-5; Hill, James P., 
3-10-2-0; Hina, Charles W., 0-1-0-0; Hina, Roy D., 2-11-0-0; 
Hinton, Henry, 12-35-8-6; Hofstetter, Joe, 9-11-1-1; Hole- 
man, Bill R., 0-2-1-1; Hollan, Raymond W., 2-5-1-0; Hollo- 
way, Samuel James, 0-1-0-0; Holt, Robert E., 9-35-4-2; Holt- 
houser, Ora Lee, 9-12-4-1; Holthouser, Terry W., 0-2-0-0; 
Holton, Ray, 4-14-1-1; Hook, B. B., 8-19-5-2; Hook, Don, 
1-3-3-1; Hord, Ronnie D., 1-3-0-0; Horn, Everett, 2-11-0-0; 
Hornsby, Colin, 0-0-1-0; Horsman, Bill, 9-19-5-4; Horton, 
John L., 0-0-1-0: Howard, Bruce L., 6-1-0-0; Howard, Dar- 
win, 0-2-0-0; Hubbard, David, 1-5-1-1; Hubbs, Cletus, 10-23- 
3-1; Huber, Jerry, 0-0-1-1; Hudson, Oscar, 0-1-0-0; Hughes, 
Paul P., 24-12-1-1 ; Hume, Charles, 4-23-8-4; Hummel, Thom- 
as, 0-1-0-0; Hunley, Neil P., 14-7-2-1; Hunter, Thurman, 
8-7-4-1; Hurley, Robert, 1-3-0-0; Hurt, Thomas C, 1-0-0-0; 
Hutchens, Jim, 6-14-0-0; Huter, James J., 2-1-0-1; Hyland, 
Frank D., 1-2-0-0 

Idol, Billy Joe, 16-12-1-0; Ingram, William R., 0-1-0-0; 
Irwin, Charlie, 1-3-0-0 

Jacobs, Dorris R., 1-1-1-1 ; Jahnigen, Robert, 1-0-0-0; Jen- 
kins, Beryl, 1-1-1-0; Johnson, Harry B., 26-29-2-1 ; Johnson, 
James M., 13-27-4-1 ; Johnson, Ronald L., 2-14-4-7; Johnson, 
Walter, 20-15-7-0; Johnson, W. Bernard, 6-32-4-1 ; Johnson, 
Willie, 0-3-0-0; Joiner, D. Russell, 0-0-1-0; Jones, Bobby, 
1-2-0-0; Jones, G. Carson, 2-15-1-2; Jones, Dan, 0-2-0-0; 
Jones, Denver, 3-1-2-0; Jones, Ervin, 3-7-2-1; Jones, Frank, 
0-4-1-1 ; Jones, Paul, 0-2-0-0; Jones, Robert L., 5-7-1-1 ; Jones, 
William L., 1-1-0-0; Jump, Frank E., 0-7-2-1; Jnnker, Edwin 
G., 1-0-0-1 

Karr, Don O., 0-2-0-0; Kays, Herbert S., 2-2-0-0; Keatley, 
James H., 0-3-0-0; Keeling, Reuben, 0-0-2-0; Kelly, Charles R., 
3-7-1-2; Kelsch, Ron, 0-1-0-0; Kidd, Frank, 1-0-0-0; Kilcoyne, 
James Don, 0-2-0-0; Kimmel, Jerry, 56-23-5-0; King, James 
A., 29-28-6-5; King, Raymond, 2-9-1-0; Kinney, Dale, 2-2-1-0; 
Kirk, Charles F., 13-30-4-2; Knauer, Glen M., 0-0-0-1; Knight, 
Bill, 17-6-2-6; Kouns, Robert H., 8-7-0-0; Kratzenberg, Rich- 
ard, 0-0-3-2; Kuhl, Lawrence, 18-23-1-0; Kupper, James Mi- 
chael, 0-0-1-0 

Lambert, Irvin, 4-4-0-0; Lambert, R. E., 2-3-2-0; Landers, 
John F., 0-1 1-1-1 ; Larsen, George, 2-5-2-0; Laskey, George O., 
0-1-2-0; Latkovski, Anastasius, 2-14-5-1 ; Laubheimer, Don T., 
20-21-5-5; Laugherty, Kenneth Ray, 1-1-1-0; Lawson, Ron- 
dell, 22-23-3-0; Layne, Bert, 1-1-0-1; Lefevers, Colman J., 
0-0-1-0; Leigh, Eugene F., 0-0-1-0; Lequire, H. M., 7-14-1-0; 
Lile, Clyde F., 12-12-2-3; Lillie, William Westly, 3-1-1-0; List, 
Frank A., 7-17-1-1; Lloyd, David, 0-5-1-0; Logsdon, Al 
3-1-0-0; Long, Bill, 0-3-3-3; Long, James E., 1-3-0-0; Long, 
Robert F., 5-13-0-2; Lord, James F., 0-0-0-1; Louden, Hu- 
bert C, 14-21-6-7; Loudy, Kenneth, 7-21-1-1 ; Lowe, Gene T., 
17-2 5-7-0; Lowe, James D., 0-6-10-4; Lucas, Gene T., 
21-4-3-2; Leubbers, Leonard, 3-2-1-1; Lusby, George, 16-17- 
13-2; Lytle, William Price, 9-19-2-3 

McBride, W. Kenneth, 4-1-1-0; McCargo, Frank, 7-27-5-0; 
McCarley, John W., 8-15-0-1; McClure, William Scott, 15-16- 
2-1; McCowan, Connell, 3-7-5-0; McCoy, Hayse, 12-25-2-4; 
McCoy, Larry, 1-0-0-1; McGehee, Gordon, 13-19-5-0; Mc- 
Ginty, L. V., 0-1-2-0; McGlasson, Galen, 2-10-0-1 ; McKenzie, 
Robert L., 1-0-0-0; McLane, Albert, 34-23-2-1; McLean, Gor- 
don, 3-7-0-1; McMenama, John H., 4-2-0-0; McMillin, Larry 
L., 0-2-1-1; McNamee, Jack, 0-2-2-0; McPike, Ray S., 0-0-1-1 

Maddox, Richard, 3-1-0-0; Madon, Robert L., 13-15-4-0; 



Maines, George E., 23-19-6-2; Markham, James R., 0-0-0-1; 
Marklay, George, 0-2-0-0; Marshall, T. N., 4-3-2-0; Martin, 
Carl T., 3-5-0-0; Martin, Woody Ray, 0-2-0-0; Mason, Gene 
A., 3-1 1-8-3; Massie, Stephen, 1-2-0-2; Mathis, Mike, 0-7-0-0; 
Mauney, Bill, 1-0-0-1 ; May, E. B., Jr., 17-25-0-1 ; May, Larry, 
0-2-2-1; Mayes, Edward, 1-1-0-0; Mayfield, Clarkie, 2-1-0-0; 
Maynard, Lonnie, 0-1-1-0; Meade, Foster, 1 1-8-2-1 ; Meadows, 
Marvin, 12-26-4-1 ; Melear, Leland, 15-32-6-0; Melmige, James, 
5-5-2-0; Melton, Bob, 0-1-1-0; Meredith, Denny E., 20-23-3-5; 
Metzger, Donald R., 8-12-4-0; Middleton, Johnny, 8-3-1-0; 
Milbern, Dan, 6-18-0-2; Miles, Marvin, 2-7-1-1; Miles, Robert 
J., 1-4-1-0; Miller, Bob, 14-15-8-1 ; Miller, Claude O., 0-4-3-0; 
Miller, Ferrell, 8-12-3-4; Miller, Harold P., 0-7-0-1; Miller, 
Rex, 0-2-1-1; Moberly, Harold F., 0-4-0-0; Monahan, Ed, 
1-2-0-0; Montgomery, Chester, 26-21-9-2; Moore, Clarence K., 
1-0-0-0; Moore, Marvin, 0-1-0-0; Moore, Richard E., 0-1-0-0; 
Moore, Robert, 7-32-8-0; Morgan, Richard, 8-14-2-2; Morse, 
Richard K., 31-38-6-1; Moser, Rudy C, 51-34-1-2; Mudd, Ed, 
5-10-1-0; Mullins, Larry B., 0-1-0-0; Murphy, Tom, 0-2-1-1; 
Murrell, Allen L., 7-27-4-3 

Napier, Wallace, Jr., 0-4-0-0; Nash, Dennis B., 2-18-3-2; 
Newman, Bill, 9-9-0-0; Newsome, William, Jr., 0-0-1-0; New- 
ton, John T., 0-1-3-0; Norwood, Donald V., 0-1-0-1; Nor- 
wood, Thomas R., 0-7-2-2; Nunnelley, Steve, 0-0-1-0; Nuss, 
Albert M., 7-2-2-1 

O'Connell, Jim, 1-6-0-0; O'Keefe, Thomas, 1-2-2-0; Omer, 
Harold G., 4-7-4-2; O'Nan, Harold, 3-8-2-0; O'Nan, Norman, 
12-25-4-1; Orem, Dale L., 3-6-0-2; O'Rourke, Thomas J., 
2-0-0-0; Orton, Jimmy A., 0-2-1-0; Osborne, Gary Lee, 
1-0-0-1; Osting, Lawrence J., 1-0-1-1; Otis, Billy, 5-15-4-1; 
Owens, Bruce E., 1-6-1-0; Owens, Bruce Van, 0-5-1-0 

Pace, Donald, 2-3-1-0; Pack, James E., 1-3-4-2; Padgett, 
R. K., 12-28-6-0; Palko, Edward T., 0-4-0-0; Park, J. M., 
3-2-3-1; Parker, Francis V., 1-2-1-0; Parrish, Willie, 4-1-1-0; 
Parrott, Lanny L., 38-15-4-2; Parsons, Fred, 7-20-2-1; Patter- 
son, Bill, 0-6-4-3; Paxton, Gary R., 2-1-0-1; Payne, Gayle, 
3-7-3-0; Peay, Curtis, 0-1-1-0; Peecher, W. Lloyd, 0-0-1-1; 
Peeno, Harry, 4-10-2-1; Pence, Jerry, 3-28-8-2; Perkins, Ron- 
nie L., 7-18-7-2; Perry, James E., 6-7-3-1 ; Phelps, Ralph Rudy, 
2-5-2-1; Phelps, Ray, 2-4-3-0; Phillips, Thomas M., 0-6-2-0; 
Phipps, James M., 1-0-0-0; Pietrowski, Paul, 6-6-7-0; Points, 
Charles, 0-10-1-3; Pope, Roy, 0-2-1-0; Poppas, Nicholas, 
1-0-0-0; Powers, Clark, 0-1-0-0; Prater, Rondel R., 0-3-0-0; 
Price, Don M., 3-3-0-2; Price, James E., 8-15-1-3; Priode, 
Charles, 0-0-1-0 

Quisenberry, James M., 0-0-2-0 

Racke, Jerry W., 0-0-1-0; Rader, Douglas, 1-4-2-0; Rakel, 
Bob, 4-4-2-1; Ramey, Herb, 21-18-4-0; Ravenscraft, Glendon, 
0-1-0-0; Redman, Carl J., 0-1-0-0; Redman, Melvin P., 
9-16-0-1; Reed, Charles R., 17-20-2-0; Reed, Gordon, 6-10-2-0; 
Rees, Gayle H., 3-5-1-0; Reherman, Fred James, 0-1-0-0; 
Reinhardt, Myron S., 22-23-1-0; Reliford, Paul G., 7-14-4-1; 
Reschar, John V., 8-7-2-1; Rexroat, Jerry L., 17 : 32-4-l, 
Rhodes, Cecil, 0-0-0-1; Rice, William L., 1-7-0 0; Rich,' Dennis 
W., 1-5-0-0; Ricketts, Claude O., 10-14-4-4; Ricketts, Donald, 
8-15-0-1; Riggs, Floyd L.. 1-9-0-0; Ring, Bill, 20-37-5-5; Ris- 
ter, Edgar L., 23-29-2-2; Ritter, Goebel, 25-11-2-0; Roberts, 
Kenneth Gary, 0-1-5-0; Robinson, Don L., 3-8-3-1; Roe, 
Doyle, 6-4-2-1; Roeckers, Bernie, 0-2-0-0; Roesel, Joseph F., 
4-15-1-0; Rogers, Howard, 22-21-4-1; Roller, Otis, 0-2-1-0; 
Romans, Jerry, 2-8-2-0; Roney, Robert D., 1-0-0-1; Rose, 
Scott, 6-7-1-0; Rose, Wally, 2-6-3-0; Ross, Harold, 4-2-1-1; 
Roy, Charles David, 0-3-0-0; Runyon, Tommy Dean, 4-13-2-0; 
Russell, Allen, 13-27-6-4 

Sagers, Robert M., 0-1-0-0; Salyer, Henry E., 0-2-0-0; 
Sams, Glenn, 1-1-0-0; Sanders, Mel, 2-4-0-0; Sandusky, Jerry, 
2-12-2-1 ; Saylors, Carlee, 0-4-2-4; Scales, Meredith E., 0-1-0-0; 
Schad, Jim, 0-3-2-0; Schleicher, Richard L., 1-1-0-0; Schlich, 
Paul E., 1-7-1-1 ; Schmidt, Thomas C, 0-3-0-0; Scott, Emman- 
uel, 0-1-0-0; Scott, W. L., 0-0-1-0; Sears, Wilson, 13-12-5-1; 
Seavers, Joe, 4-9-2-1; Seibert, Billy Ray, 1-1-0-1; Sellier, Ed, 
4-12-1-0; Selvy, Curt, 15-1 1-2-0; Sharp, Lloyd, 0-3-0-0; Shart- 
zer, E. Phillip, 15-32-5-1 ; Shaw, Earl, 1 1-45-6-1 ; Shewmaker, 
Treffert, 1-2-0-0; Shewmaker, Wayne, 3-7-5-2; Shields, Neil, 
1-1-1-0; Shope, Lowell M., 0-1-0-0; Showalter, John, 4-0-0-2; 
Shuck, Tomas G., 6-18-2-2; Simpson, Fred C, 4-10-6-2; Sims, 
Frank D., 27-25-4-0; Sims, Tom M., 0-1-0-0; Singer, Tony, 
5-3-4-3; Singleton, Bobby, 9-33-4-2; Singleton, Jerry, 4-6-5-0; 
Skaggs, Robert, 4-7-0-0; Small, Bill, 2-1 9-6-2 ; Smith, Gary U., 
1-3-0-2; Smith, James H., 1-3-1-0; Smith, Richard R., 3-0-0-0; 
Smith, Roy M., 20-27-2-2; Smith, Wayne N., 27-16-5-1; 
Smith, Willard N., 24-13-3-0; Smith, William E., 5-13-3-0; 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER 1 969 



Page Seven 



Smith, W. Jack, 12-28-8-5; Smithson, Richard A., 16-24-0-1; 
Snow, James A., 0-1-3-0; Snow, Robert W., 0-1-2-0; Sparks, 
Keith E., 2-4-0-2; Speck, Michael E., 8-10-4-0; Spencer, Irv, 
16-17-4-1; Spiceland, S. E., 6-8-1-2; Spoonamore, Jim, 
9-23-0-2; Starling, Edward, 0-1-0-0; Steenken, William R., 
0-5-3-0; Stephens, Herbert D., 1-0-1-0; Stephenson, Harry S., 
3-1-3-0; Stethen, James E., 1-6-0-2; Stiff, Maurice E., 
12-21-6-2; Stikeleather, Clyde Lewis, 28-21-4-0; Stinson, 
Charles L., 1-2-2-0; Stoess, Henry L., 3-13-3-0; Stovall, Tom, 
0-13-3-0; Strain, Richard P., 4-24-4-1; Strong, Arnett, 3-20- 
2-1; Sucietto, Richard, 0-1-1-0; Sullivan, Dan L., 9-10-2-0; 
Sullivan, Don Chris, 22-14-4-0; Sumner, Carl H., 19-15-4-3; 
Swarts, Joseph C, 0-1-1-0; Switzer, Richard J., 0-7-2-2 

Tackett, Archie, 0-0-1-0; Tapscott, Ozzie, 0-1-0-1; Tate, 
Harold Dean, 5-14-0-0; Taylor, Ed, 13-22-1-1; Thomas, Billy 
G., 5-5-2-2; Thompson, Jack, 1-1-0-0; Thompson, Kenneth, 
16-12-1-0; Thompson, Larry, 0-1-0-0; Thompson, Thomas A., 
22-12-4-4; Thompson, Tom D., 0-2-0-0; Thompson, William 
D., 0-0-0-1; Thornton, Daniel A., 0-3-0-1; Tillery, James C, 
7-6-3-1; Tillery, William E., 3-1-3-0; Tinsley, Marion F., 
13-33-6-3; Triplett, Herbert W., 50-21-11-1; Tyre, Donald C, 
9-17-2-0 

Urlage, Richard. 11-27-1-0 

VanHook, Samuel, 1-6-1-0; Vanover, J. W., 2-13-2-0; Van- 
over, Wiley, 3-13-4-0; VanZant, Jim, 5-13-3-0; Varble, Wil- 
liam E., 0-3-0-0; Varner, Ray G., 1-11-2-1; Vaughan, Ronald 
G., 0-2-0-1; Vaughn, Ronald B., 0-4-1-0; Vermillion, C. D., 
3-8-1-1; Vescovi, Raymond B., 4-0-0-0; Vest, Thomas, 0-1-0-0; 
Vinciguerra, Phillip, 0-0-1-0; Vipperman, Albert E., 0-3-2-1; 
Voorhis, Kenneth, 2-8-1-1; Vories, Dick, 6-19-2-1; Wallace, 
Curt, 1-0-0-1; Wallace, Theodore, 0-0-2-0; Wallen, Howard 
W., 1-0-1-0; Waller, Bobbie E., 6-13-8-4; Walton, Roy, 
6-11-4-1; Ward, Bob, 7-11-4-1; Weaver, Clyde Ivan, 0-5-0-0; 
Weaver, Ray, 5-15-0-6; Weihe, Robert J., 2-3-0-0; Weiner, 
Richard, 0-7-2f-0; Wells, Glenn, 2-5-2-1; Wesche, James A., 
2-12-0-2; West, John, 5-5-9-1; Westerfield, James C, 0-0-2-0; 
Weyer, James G., 3-5-0-0; Wheeler, Joe H., 1-10-3-1; White, 
David B., 0-6-2-0; Wickham, James R., 4-21-7-6; Wilcox, 
Ursal Ray, 4-1-2-0; Williams, Benny, 0-1-0-0; Williams, Jack 
A., 6-1-0-0; Williams, James H., 0-2-0-0; Williams, Paul W., 
4-0-1-0; Williams, Roger, 27-16-6-2; Williams, S. Jack, 4-11- 
3-1; Williams, Tom G., 4-6-1-0; Williamson, Fred, 0-1-0-0; 
Winchester, Roy L., 15-24-3-3; Winfrey, Shelby, 47-34-5-3; 
Wingfield, Felix G., 8-0-1-0; Wirtz, Howard A., 0-8-6-1 ; Wise, 
Billy V., 19-9-0-0; Wise, Jack, 26-8-2-0; Withrow, Roy D., 
0-3-0-0; Witten, Clifford, 1-2-0-0; Witten, Hershel D., 2-1-0-1; 
Witten, James Richard, 0-0-1-1; Wolfe, Douglas, 0-1-0-0; 
Wolfe, Paul A., 2-0-0-0; Wood, James Randall, 2-6-1-0; Woods, 
Gene B., 6-15-6-5; Woosley, James R., 0-1-0-0; Wooten, Ches- 
ter, 0-0-1-0; Wooten, George B., 2-6-1-0; Woprice, Ronald J., 
3-5-0-5; Wright, James L., 1-3-0-2; Wright, Raleigh F., 0-4-1-0; 
Wulfeck, James, 0-1-1-0; Wyatt, Ronald Lee, 1-0-1-0 

Yelton, Gene B., 2-0-0-1; Young, lames R., 1-1-0-0 
Zimmerer. Ray Martin, 0-1-0-0 

New Sports Magazine 

LETTERMAN, a new national high school sports maga- 
zine, will be launched during the coming school year, pub- 
Usher Paul Nyberg has announced. The new periodical writ- 
ten and edited specifically for high school athletes will start 
bimonthly in February 1970 and move to monthly publica- 
tion by 1971. 

"High school athletic programs remain one of the few 
structures in our whole society that turn boys into men," 
Nyberg says. "LETTERMAN's purpose, therefore, is to show 
to the athlete through articles, stories and features just how 
important this interscholastic sports experience is to him." 

LETTERMAN will be available to high school athletes 
without cost. Through the goodwill of advertisers the maga- 
zine will be mailed free of charge to the home of each high 
school athlete who signs up for it through his coach. All high 
school athletes on interscholastic teams representing the 
school qualify to receive LETTERMAN. This includes fresh- 
man, sophomore, junior varsity and varsity team members. 

LETTERMAN editorial and circulation policies and pro- 
cedures have been carefully worked out in conjunction with 
a National Advisory Council. Council members include Clif- 
ford Fagan, executive secretary of the National Federation of 
State High School Athletic Associations, and several execu- 



tive secretaries of state high school associations. The council 
also has the services of Franklin L. Orth, president of the 
U. S. Olympic Committee; Dr. Frank Jones, president of the 
Athletic Institute; Lyndon Lee, vice president of the Life- 
time Sports Foundation; George Halas, chairman of the 
board, Chicago Bears; Harvey C. Chrouser, athletic director, 
Wheaton College, Wheaton, 111.; Dr. Deobold Van Dalen, 
chairman, department of physical education, University of 
California at Berkeley, and several high school coaches and 
athletic directors. 

Sign-up materials for the magazine are being sent to each 
high school coach in all schools throughout the U. S. The 
press run on the first issue will be limited to one million on a 
first-come, first-served basis. 

Coaches likewise qualify to receive LETTERMAN without 
cost. 

LETTERMAN is owned and published by Letterman 
Publications, Inc., Box 804, Wheaton, Illinois 60187. "The 
new publishing company was formed by a group of con- 
cerned businessmen and coaches who care about our country 
and want to do something positive for youth," says Nyberg. 
"Since high school athletes are the true indigenous leaders in 
our schools and communities, we believe that LETTERMAN 
will provide a needed voice to speak both to them and for 
them." 

Board Minutes 

(Continued from Page Two) 
Committee in employing Billy V. Wise be approved by the 
Board. The motion was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner reported that information received 
from the State Department of Education concerning recent 
consolidation of schools in Basketball District 18, will result 
in this district having only three K.H.S.A.A. member school 
during the forthcoming school year. After considerable 
discussion concerning this information, W. H. Crowdus 
moved, seconded by Don Davis, that Green County be 
moved from Basketball District 20 to Basketball District 
18 for the 1969-70 school year. The motion was carried. 

The Commissioner presented to each member of the 
Board a statistical sheet giving information for the 1957-69 
period concerning executive and staff member salaries; 
insurance, social security, and other fringe benefits, requested 
by the Board during its June 7th meeting. 

The Commissioner stated that he had received a request 
from the Louisville and Jefferson County Youth Commission 
for the sanction of certain track competitors who might be 
engaged in the United States Youth Games, either at the 
state, regional, or national level. He stated that he had asked 
the Commission to file with his office a list of all participants, 
including students who may have been varsity competitors 
representing their local high schools and who might make 
themselves ineligible by competing in a non-sanctioned 
regional or national track event which had not received 
Board of Control sanction. He further stated that such a list 
was in his possession. Tom Mills moved, seconded by 
Foster J. Sanders, that the Commissioner by delegated 
authority from the Board of Control be authorized to restore 
to eligibility any track participant who may have made him- 
self or herself ineligible by taking part in the United States 
Youth Games. The motion was carried unanimously. 

Foster J. Sanders, moved, seconded by Don Davis, that 
the Commissioner be authorized to purchase for the Associa- 
tion a retirement endowment insurance policy for Assistant 
Commissioner Billy V. Wise, in the amount of $20,000.00, 
this being the same type of policy purchased previously for 
Messrs. Sanford and Mansfield. The motion was carried 
unanimously. 

President Dorsey gave a very complete report on the 1969 
National Federation Annual Meeting. 

Foster J. Sanders moved, seconded by W. H. Crowdus, that 
all bills of the Association for the period beginning June 1, 
1969, and ending July 31, 1969, be allowed. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

There being no further business, the meeting adjourned. 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER 1969 



REGISTERED FOOTBALL OFFICIALS 
OF THE K.H.S.A.A.-1969 

(List Compiled September 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed it is 
the home phone unless otherwise designated. If two numbers 
are given the first number is that of the home phone. 
Adams, Charles David, 4800 Andrea Way, Louisville, 964- 

5419, 897-1865 
Adams, Michael, 509 Brockton, Richmond, 623-4787 
Ahrens, Doug, 2314 Thornhill Road, Louisville, 425-3996 
Ahrens, James, 1 1 2 Ward, Bellevue, 261-3304, 921-1 520 
Albright, James R., Route 3, Shelbyville, 633-4614, 633-1810 
Allara, Bill, Matewan, W. Va. 

Allen, Arthur, Route 6, Franklin, 586-6836, 586-3231 
Allgood, Russell L., Route 3, Elizabethtown, 765-4921, 

769-2311 
Allison, Roy, Box 749, Harlan, 573-3789, 573-4770 
Anders, Raleigh, Route 5, Box 328, London, 864-6217, 

528-1837 
Anderson, Glenn S., Jr., Box 286, Prestonsburg, 886-3929, 

886-3552 
Anderson, John G., Cardinal Drive, Prestonsburg, 886-2278, 

886-3552 
Ashworth, Paul, 1044 Belvoir Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio, 251- 

5461,421-5700, Ext. 485 
Ayers, Edward L., 625 Laramie Road, Lexington, 277-2333, 

277-1161, Ext. 44 
Baker, David Elliott, 1814 Versailles Road, Apt. C-20, Lex- 
ington, 252-4032, 254-0505 
Ballaban, Tom, 1103 Archland Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

522-3024, 761-7600 
Barters, John T., 1344 Sixth, Dayton, 581-4250 
Bates, Bob, 1120 Meadow Lane, Portsmouth, Ohio, 354- 

2168, 353-0037 
Batterton, Keith, 602 Ashwood Court, Harrodsburg, 734-9624 
Battisti, Edward A., 510 Brockton, Richmond, 623-2457 
Beheler, Donald, 1814 Versailles Road, A-7, Lexington, 

233-2000, Ext. 2410 (Bus.) 
Bell, Clarence T., 3812 Meadow Haven Road, Louisville, 

239-0782, 582-5573 
Bellissemo, Frank J., 3524 McHenry Road, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

662-6536, 421-5700, Ext. 631 
Bennett, Howard (Pete), Route 6, Mayfield, 247-3309, 

247-3510, Ext. 41 
Benzinger, Joseph, Jr., 3502 Behymer Road, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

752-3932, 742-2193 
Bero, James J., Box 968, Williamson, W. Va. 
Bewley, Harry G., 306 Estate Drive, Elizabethtown, 765-5018, 

769-2311 
Blake, Jesse L., 503 Tenn Ave., Pineville, 337-5272, 337-2392 
Blake, Larry J., 14 Karyn Court, Barboursville, W. Va. 
Blanton, Homer, 138 New Hampshire Drive, Ashland, 324- 

1730, 324-1730 
Blevins, Donald W., 1 954 Natchez Trail, Lexington, 277-6824, 

252-3770 
Blosser, Kermit A., 80 Maplewood Drive, Athens, Ohio 
Bocook, Earl, 1 102 Beech St., Kenova, W. Va. 
Boemker, Bob, 69 Thompson, Fort Mitchell 
Bordy, Philip, 3308 Stratford, Louisville, 458-7005, 582-3994 
Bostic, Tim C, P. O. Box 503, Salyersville, 349-2243, 

349-2915 
Boswell, Martin, 218 Barrett, Providence, 667-5143, 249-3132 
Boyles, Jerry F., 2700 Algonquin, Ashland, 324-6995, 

324-1111, Ext. 5443 
Bramble, James, 153 Manitoba Lane, Lexington, 277-9477, 

255-1461, Ext. 258 
Brashear, Loy Ray, Route 1, Glendale, 854-2921, 765-2181 
Brauch, Charles J., 117Westview Drive, Bardstown, 348-3218, 

348-3991 
Brock, Alben, Kettle Island, 337-3848 
Brock, Charles LeVerne, 202 Kentucky Ave., Corbin, 528- 

5808 (Bus.) 
Brock, John H., 228 Madison Ave., Richmond, 623-4833, 

623-4959 
Brock, Johnnie G., Stoney Fork, 337-3752 
Brotzge, Maurice J., 3029 Beals Branch Drive, Louisville, 

893-7206, 896-4461 
Brown, Bill, 2553 Dell Road, Louisville, 458-4857, 383-0681 
Brown, Bix H., 1013 Darley Drive, Lexington, 2 52-1900 
Brown, Herman G., Route 2, Shelbyville, 633-2516, 589-9180 
Brown, John W., "Scoop," 975 Waverly Drive, Lexington, 

252-0954, 254-4017 
Bullock, Ted, 2622 Clays Mill Road, Lexington, 277-0145, 

252-7521 
Burgess, Oley, Sr., 1708 Sycamore St., Kenova, W. Va. 
Burke, David Dean, 583 Broom St., Ashland, 324-3047, 

324-2144 



Burke, Harry R., 328 Arnold Ave., Prestonsburg, 886-2796, 

886-2385 
Burkhart, James G., P. O. Box 169, Loyall, 573-1437, 

664-3444 
Burton, James E., 401 Barbour, Providence, 667-2296 
Burton, John, 1302 Central, Ashland, 324-5964, 324-1111, 

Ext. 8287 
Cain, Paul D., 3731 Earl Court View, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

321-7246, 871-6103 
Caldwell, Charles M., Box 2333, Huntington, W. Va. 
Calitri, Don L., Box 481, Union College, Barbourville, 

546-3775, 546-4151, Ext. 133 
Callahan, Gary, 401 Skyline Park Drive, Hopkinsville, 886- 

5026 
Canaday, Glenn, 201 Lincoln, Vine Grove, 877-5387, 877- 

5537 
Canady, Ray B., 620 N. Main, Barbourville, 546-4765, 

546-3801 
Cannon, Jerry, Box 56, Sharon, Tenn., 456-2431, 642-9711 
Carey, Al J., Jr., 417 Lehigh Terrace, Charleston, W. Va. 
Carlberg, John H., 227 Main, Muldraugh, 942-2723, 942-2730 
Carlberg, Ralph C, 1501 Elm, West Point, 922-4456 
Carlson, David A., 2916 Washington, Paducah, 444-7943, 

444-6311, Ext. 558 
Carr, Billy W., Longview Drive, Franklin, 586-6355 
Carr, John Leonard, 607 Chinn St., Raceland, 836-8949, 

324-1111 
Carr, Virgil Lee, 2924 Fitzwater Drive, South Charleston, 

W. Va. 
Cecil, Donnie, Rineyville, 877-5 877, 877-2151 
Cecil, Morris, 14 Shaw Lane, Eort Thomas, 441-8427, 

381-1480 
Chattin, Ernest P., 615 17th St., Ashland, 324-2665, 

324-6191 
Chinn, Ralph, 523 Southbend Drive, Lexington, 278-8078, 

255-3612 
Cisco, Robert N., 4288 Oakland, Fort Knox, 624-7586, 

624-7724 
Clark, Charles Louis, 2315 Brighton Drive, Louisville, 459- 

3540 
Clark, John E., P. O. Box 341, Cynthiana, 234-4605, 

234-1165 
Clark, Robert L., 303 Southern Drive, Clarksville, Tenn., 

647-2196 
Clemmons, Samuel P., 635 Central, Lexington, 255-7566, 

252-0391 
demons, Gl.-n C, 1012 Allison Lane, Jeffersonville, Ind., 

282-7498, 636-3711 
Cline. Nick, 4501 S. 6th, Apt. 38, Louisville, 367-6972, 

778-2761 
Cochran, Roy H., Jr., 509 Master St., Corbin, 528-1697, 

864-4330 
Collins, Ronald K., 2590 Old Buttermilk Road, Villa Hills, 

341-0578, 431-9964 
Cook, Jack W., 152 S. Edgemont Road, Huntington, W. Va. 
Cook, Richard N., 50 Forest Ave., Fort Thomas, 441-9269, 

243-3531 
Cooper, Norris E., 218 Dean St., Bowling Green, 842-3619, 

842-8131 
Copley, Sidney M., Box 13, Red Jacket, W. Va. 
Goppler, Arden D., 1529 Merman Drive, Lexington 
Cornwell, James, 506 S. Main, Franklin, 586-4327, 586-4451 
Cowan, R. L., 9615 Walnutwood Way, Jeffersontown, 267- 

6224, 587-1121, Ext. 387 
Craft, Albert B., 1606 Meadowthorpe Drive, Lexington, 

254-5365, 255-8600 
Crager, Bobby F., Marcia Drive, Flatwoods 
Creekmore, Les, 316 Walnut, Bellevue, 431-5259, 421-9964 
Crider, Ray, 1 120 Franelm, Louisville, 368-1 196 
Cullen, Charles, 3010 Don Dee Drive, Louisville, 451-3322, 

459-1976 
Cullum, Harold D., 3943 Rhodes Ave., New Boston, Ohio, 

456-5229, 456-4559 
Culp, Willard E., 3185 Skyline Park Drive, Hopkinsville, 

886-7967, 886-7557 
Curnutte, Ivan M., 511 Columbia Road, Greensburg, 932- 

5047,932-5231 
Curnutte, James R., 201 E. 8th Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Current, EUis Ray, 1933 Bellefonte Drive, Lexington, 277- 

1049, 278-5463 
Dallman, James W., 12 Center St., Jeffersonville, 283-7255 
Daniels, Robert M., 18 Beechwood Road, Fort Mitchell, 

331-4155 
Davis, Charles, P. O. Box 154, Loyall, 573-1640, 573-5027 
Davis, Curt, 1119 E. Burnett, Louisville, 634-4959, 582-3511 
Davis, Ralph C, 1326 S. 7th St., Ironton, Ohio, 532-8606, 

532-8143 
Deaton, Daniel E., Box 362, Matewan, W. Va. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER 1969 



Page Nine 



Delaney, William T., 17 West Ridge, Newport, 431-4410, 

421-9020 
Delph, Joseph B., Box 957, Lynch, 848-2065 
Dennedy, Robert T. (Bob), 5083 Orangelawn Drive, Cincin- 
nati, Ohio, 922-8352, 922-2300 
Dent, Donald L., 3306 Utah Ave., Apt. 1, Louisville, 

367-7819, 366-4551 
Denton, Charles, 127 Hubbard Lane, Henderson, 826-4020, 

826-9533 
Denton, William J., 303 Bakers Court, Louisville, 368-6047, 

584-9271 
DeSensi, William (Chick), 4724 Quinn Drive, Louisville, 

447-65 82 
Detenber, Gene H., 229 Tyne Road, Louisville, 895-7058, 

895-7058 
Devine, Edward, 1413 Bluegrass Ave., Louisville, 368-9176 
DeWees, William L., Jr., 511 N. 44th St., Louisville, 778-5955 
Dial, Charles, 3300 Monel Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Dial, Jack W., 3179 Sumner Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Dierolf, Col. William H., Jr., Forest Drive, Applewood Manor, 

Route 1, Dallas, Pa., 675-5633, 532-2349 
Dizney, Alan, 206 4th St., Corbin 
Downey, Robert F., 327 26th St., Dunbar, W. Va. 
Downs, Joseph W., 829 Bartley, Bardstown, 348-5123, 

438-3991 
Drake, Richard R., 72 Donnelly Drive, Fort Thomas, 

441-4235 
Draud, Jon E., 109 Vernon Drive, Fort Mitchell, 341-3831, 

431-6157 
Dryden, Wallace Lee, 163 E. Maxwell, Lexington, 252-2733, 

258-9000, Ext. 2517 
Duckworth, Johnny, 1430 Frederica, Owensboro, 685-2206 
Due, Larry E., 514 Edgar Court, Erlanger, 341-4155, 341- 

4155 
Duff, Earl, 202 Leimaur, Richmond, 623-6845, 623-6845 
Duff, William C. Jr.. 1905 Cambridge Drive, Lexington, 

255-5057, 255-0716 
Durbin, Roy V., 2911 Dale Ann Drive, Louisville, 452-1730, 

587-1121, Ext. 237 
Easley, Dan W., 107 Morrison, Wilmore 
Edwards, Sonny, 508 Jefferson Ave., Milton, W. Va. 
Egan, Joseph Patrick, 2036 Deauville, Lexington, 233-1667, 

255-3612, Ext. 71 
Eldridge, Wayne R., Science Hill, 423-3495, 678-8161 
Elliott, Carroll L., 307 CoUege, Elizabethtown, 765-4007, 

765-6118 
EUis, Johnny, P. O. Box 331, Prestonsburg, 886-2751, 

886-3080 
Elovitz, Carl, 1920 Spring Grove Ave., Lexington, 277-3994, 

873-4901 
Engle, OrviUe, 128 Oak St., Pineville, 337-2916 
Ernst, Edward R., P. O. Box 7 5040, Cincinnati, Ohio 
Farina, Lawrence, 2837 Fairway Drive, Tempe, Ariz. 
Faust, John, 2427 Concord Drive, Louisville 
Fay, John C, 319 C. St., Price Road, Lexington, 233-1982 
Feck, Richard A., Route 1, Wilmore, 858-4174 
Fenimore, Clarke E., 3943 Kennison Ave., Louisville, 896- 

4716, 282-0471 
Ferguson, Roy, Route 3, Barbourville, 546-3893, 546-4007 
Fesmire, Gerald, 219 Sunnyside Drive, Jackson, Tenn., 

424-9282,422-6621 
Ferguson, Thomas L., 215 Oney Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Fields, Rickey P., Box 684, U.K.M.C., Lexington 
Fields, Ronald M., 1673 Country Club Lane, Henderson, 

826-9859, 826-8381 
Fish, Leland G., 826 Oak Hill, Lexington, 255-7156, 252- 

2312 
Fitzpatrick, Kenneth, 104 Wooton, Hazard, 436-6121, 436- 

2212 
Flynn, Bobby, 428 McKenna Court, Lexington, 299-5902, 

252-4464 
Fortney, Robert Lee, 2817 Breckinridge Lane, Louisville, 

458-1079, 582-3511, Ext. 472 
Foster, Berryman E., 927 Waverly Drive, Lexington, 255- 

7374, 252-2312 
Foster, J. W., 292 Winn Way Drive, Lexington, 277-8636, 

255-6666 
Fraley, Bill, 1604 Lee Drive, Henderson, 827-3232 
Frankel, Louis S., 3723 Stanton Blvd., Louisville, 454-6519, 

454-6519 
Franklin, Clifford, 10152 Zig Zag Road, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

891-3567, 251-4828 
Frazer, Tom Roe, Route 1, Sturgis, 333-4412, 333-4672 
Freese, Ollie, 5518 Mapleridge, Cincinnati, Ohio, 561-5398, 

351-7010 



Fryrear, Bill P., 204 Lanark Dell, Middletown, 245-0354, 

452-4846 
Fucci, Dominic A., 752 Wellington Way, Lexington, 277-6327, 

254-8555 
Fuller, Wilton H., 533 Hill-n-Dale, Lexington, 277-6654, 

266-0115 
Gallaher, Jack, 2947 Adams Ave., Ashland, 325-2420, 324- 

2143 
Garrett, Richard A., P. O. Box 37, Simpsonville, 722-8858, 

722-8995 
Gentry, Dale J., 4945 Determine Lane, Louisville, 447-5981, 

585-5814 
Gentry, William R., Jr., Oakley Bldg., Bardstown, 348-8903, 

348-3767 
George, Boyce D., 2418 Glenmary, Louisville, 458-8582 
Gettler, John F., 705 Providence Road, Lexington, 266-4801, 

254-4017 
Gfell. George V., 3319 Coldstream, Lexington, 269-1218 
Gilkerson, Pat H., Route 1, Box 38, Prichard, W. Va., 

486-5291, 429-3341 
Gish, James T., Route 1, Box 244, Robards 
Glass, K. L., 108 Adkins St., Clarksville, Tenn., 648-2056 
Glass, Larry Allen, 258 Brockton, Richmond, 623-1996 

(Bus.) 
Golden, Billy Joe, 436 E. Main, Lynch, 848-2512 
Gore, Bailey, 1603 Sunset Drive, Murray, 753-8509, 762-6286 
Gorham, Harry C., 117 Hamilton Park, Lexington, 255-4165, 

252-2011 
Grabowski, James T., Route 2, Box 102-B, Catlettsburg, 

739-6448, 739-6448 
Grace, Charles K., Cypress St., Pineville, 337-3331, 337-2348 
Graham, James E., 2517 Jackson St., Ashland, 324-8169, 

325-8511, Ext. 732 
Griffey, Richard, Box 1425, Williamson, W. Va. 
Guinn, Bill, 4600 Country Club Blvd., South Charleston, 

W. Va. 
Gupton, Lawrence, 105 Hillview, Greensburg, 932-5001, 

465-4101 
Guy, Newton S., 439 E. Mound St., Harlan, 573-1598 
Hadden, Newell P., Jr., 942 Wolf Run Road, Lexington 
Hagan, Joe E., 3000 Sherbrooke Rd., Louisville, 458-1325 
Hagy, Harold J., 715 Grant St., Charleston, W. Va. 
Hall, Charles E. 425 Yale Drive, Lexington, 278-3995 
Hall, Dale L., 31 Candy Lane, Chesapeake, Ohio, 867-3370, 

529-7191 
Hall, Richard T., 2960 Rio Rita, Louisville, 458-6611, 

582-9562 
Hall, William W., 474 S. Highland Ave., Prestonsburg, 

886-3415, 886-3548 
Hamilton, James E., Jr., 6910 Conn Drive, Louisville, 

968-1201, 452-4264 
Hamilton, Mike D., Circle Drive, South Shore, 932-4673, 

932-3757 
Hamilton, Vernon K., 4213 Kirby Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

681-4284, 451-1611 
Hammons, J. S., 107 Sycamore, Barbourville, 546-4720 
Hancock, Norb, 3823 Mamaroneck, Louisville, 451-7368, 

451-7368 
Harjo, Austin A., 108 Airport Road, Clarksville, Tenn., 

431-3781, 798-3781 
Harris, David L., 321 W. Stephen Foster, Bardstown, 

348-5733, 348-3311 
Harris, Jerry, Route 6, Springfield, Tenn., 384-8656, 384- 

4578 
Harsh, Ronald B., 211 Oxford Place, Louisville, 893-2335, 

774-7379 
Hawkins, Donald H., Route 1, Ekron, 828-3631, 828-2125 
Hawkins, Will A., "Bill," 407 Grace St., Springfield, Tenn., 

384-5310, 384-5583 
Heaberlin, Bill, Washington Avenue, Flatwoods, 836-6915, 

325-8511, Ext. 469 
Heaberlin, Gerald, 965 Greenup St., Catlettsburg, 739-5655 
Hedge, David William, 321 Mockingbird Drive, Jeffersonville, 

Ind., 283-3962, 283-3155 
Heinichen, Carl C., 1941 Shollenberger Ave., Cincinnati, 

Ohio, 931-7997, 931-7997 
Heinold, F. Thomas, 6702 Plantation Way, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

522-7834, 731-9039 
Heinze, Frank, 204 Maple Ave., Prestonsburg, 886-2436, 

377-2481 
Heinze, John G., 39 Highland Ave., Prestonsburg, 886-2195, 

886-2708 
Hendon, L. J., 228 S. 15th St., Murray, 753-3658, 753-2825 
Hensley, Larry O., Box 572, Lexington, 255-9346, 299-1221, 

Ext. 6102 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER 1969 



Herrick, Calvin P., Jr., 200 S. Arnold Ave., Prestonsburg, 

886-3494, 886-2311 
Hicks, Lloyd, 6253 Springmeyer Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

662-5103, 771-6350, Ext. 452 
Higgins, Edward H., 1530 E. Seventh, Hopkinsville, 886- 

2864, 843-1796 
Hina. Charles W., Route 1, Box 202, Sturgis, 333-4409, 

821-4422 
Hina, Henry B., Route 1, Sturgis, 333-5933, 333-4008 
Hofstetter, Joe, Box 1815, Williamson, W. Va. 
Holland, David W., 303 Court Drive, Fulton, 472-3656, 

472-2636 
Hollingsworth, Ralph D., 206 8th Ave. E., Springfield, Tenn., 

384-5467, 384-5700 
Holman, "Bitsy" (S. T.), 207 2nd St., Corbin, 528-5197, 

528-3213 
Holman, Joseph B., 2101 St. Teresa Drive, Lexington, 266- 

7046, 255-6812, Ext. 311 
Holthouser, Terry W., 5322 Georgia Lane, Louisville, 764- 

2950, 239-3267 
Holton, Glenn, 121 Nelson Court, Barboursville, W. Va. 
Hornsby, Colin, 784 Federal Way, Russell, 836-9137, 324- 

1111 
Horsman, Bill, 2902 S. Sth St., Louisville, 637-1201, 964-3301 
Howard, Robert E., Kettle Island, 337-5368. 337-5260 
Howard, Jasper B., 1305 Gloucester, Middlesboro, 248-3388, 

337-3093 
Hubbard, John Douglas, 215 W. Beall, Bardstown, 348-3067, 

348-81 14 
Huber, Carl W., 125 N. 37th Street, Louisville, 774-3387 
Huber, Jerry, 2873 W. McMicken Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

681-0897, 431-5723 
Huffine, Gary L., 2114 Harrison, Paducah, 442-4125, 443- 

8471 
Hughes, Paul P., 520 Riverside Drive, Prestonsburg, 886-6471, 

886-2364 
Hunter, James E., 4219 Naneen Drive, Louisville, 367-1361, 

584-7848 
Hunter, Willard C, 713 Jefferson Avenue, Huntington, W. Va. 
Hurley, Ken. 3205 Christie Place, Owensboro, 683-0360, 

683-5315 
Hurley, Robert, Box 244, Williamson, W. Va. 
Idol, Billy Joe, 124 Leafwood Road, Middlesboro, 248-2837, 

248-5560 
Idol, Lloyd, Jr., 116 Leafwood Road, Middlesboro, 248-5761 
Ingram, William R., Det. C, 12th MP GP (CI), Ft. Knox, 

624-4898, 624-7455 
Isaacs, Jack, Bellefonte Road, Flatwoods, 836-5490, 325- 

8511, Ext. 731 
Isaacs, Marvin D., 3229 Deborah Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

522-0988, 771-3100, Ext. 33 
Ishmael, Stephen A., 1803 Ashmoor Lane, Anchorage 
Jacoby, Ben, 127 Showalter Drive, Georgetown, 863-0508, 

255-6812, Ext. 12 
James, Gene, 1507 S. Third Street, Ironton, Ohio, 532-6976, 

532-6224 
Janes, Steven Thomas, 4901 Saddlebrook Apts., Louisville, 

448-2194 
Jarrell, Frank W., Box 46, Ceredo, W. Va. 
Jenkins, Beryl M., 2326 S. 11th, Ironton, Ohio, 532-5215, 

532-3911 
Johnson, Bernard M., 322 Blueberry Lane, Lexington 
Johnson, Bob, 3310 Springhaven, Catlettsburg, 739-4628 
Johnson, Charles L., 9124 Kenlock Avenue, Louisville, 

425-6462 
Johnson, Gordon M., 1011 Garren Street, Pikeville, 437-4758, 

437-6126 
Johnson, Harry A., Jr., 348 Friedman Avenue, Paducah, 

443-1767, 444-6311, Ext. 402 
Johnson, Stan W., 3500 Ashlawn Drive, Owensboro, 684-21 57 
Jones, George W., 6207 Pine Drive, Huntington, W. Va. 
Jones, James Ervin, 1804 Oak Street, Hopkinsville, 886-8050, 

798-6903 
Jones, J. Carl, 1904 Goodwin Avenue, Corbin, 528-2349, 

528-2450 
Jones, John Howard, Route No. 1, Adolphus, 622-6200 
Jones, Paul 1166 Ojibwa Trail, Frankfort, 227-6648, 564- 

4718 
Jones, Paul D., 3526 Deibel Way, Louisville, 459-7896, 

636-49 80 
Jude, Harold D., Matewan, W. Va. 
Jump, Frank E., 200 Elizabeth, Bowling Green, 842-8060, 

843-4707 
Junker, Edwin G., 1045 W. Seymour Avenue, Cincinnati, 

Ohio, 821-4117 
Kallaher, Jim, 415 W. 70th, Kansas City, Mo., 361-3007, 

503-8378 



Karres, Ronald R., 705 9th Avenue, Huntington, W. Va. 
Kathman, Bernie, 3060 Elmwood, Ft. Mitchell, 341-7369 

621-7541 
Kaufman, Alvin R., 8215 St. Anthony Church Road, Louis 

ville, 366-0126, 587-0871 
Keller, Terry Joe, 209 Oak Street, Ludlow, 581-8777 
Kelly, William G., 421-A "A" Street, Fort Knox, 624-7887 

624-1957 
Kemper, Russ, 5732 Lauder Dale Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio 

931-6222, 621-4380 
Kennedy, James R., 1685 Alexandria Drive, Apt. 6- A, Lexing 

ton, 277-7872, 258-9000, Ext. 2141 
Kerr, Kenneth, 10806 Grafton Hall, Valley Station, 937-3008 
Kimble, Frank, Box 2173, Williamson, W. Va. 
King, Allen, Route No. 1, Box 482, Henderson, 826-9647 

477-5572 
Kirk. Charles, Main Street, Benham, 848-2039 
Riser, Larry L., 10,000 Thixton Lane, Fern Creek, 239-0548 

239-3234 
Kraft, H. Nellis, 2606 Delor Avenue, Louisville, 637-8452 

584-4253 
Kratzenberg, Ralph, 2412 South 10th, Ironton, Ohio, 532 

5741, 532-5741 
Kratzenberg, Richard R., 2535 S. 8th., Ironton, Ohio, 532 

0914 
Kratzenberg, Robert R., 2420 S. 11th., Ironton, Ohio 

532-5741, 532-4840 
Kruk, Louis A., 4102 Lancaster Avenue, S. E. Charles 

ton, W. Va. 
Kuhl, Lawrence, Houser Lane, London, 864-6235, 864-4182 
Lambert, Irvin, 5110 Rural Way, Louisville, 969-4718 

582-5504 
Landers, John F., 32 Charlemagne, Clarksville, Tenn., 647 

2656, 798-6805 
Lange, William E., Jr., 5515 Ken Lane, Louisville, 935-4710 

635-6359 
Law, William J., 1072 Pamela Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio, 231 

2479, 441-0068 
Lawson, Leland, 949 Deporres, Lexington, 254-1009, 254- 

8074 
Leahy, Pat, 2907 Cromarty Way, Louisville, 459-2066, 587 

1121, Ext. 472 
Lee, Douglas, Harlan, 573-2676, 573-3440 
Lee, William A., Box 1 16, Wallins Creek, 664-2127, 573-5027 
Lefevers, Colman J., Kettle Island, 337-3808 
Lefevers, Keith, Kettle Island, 337-3808 
Lehkamp, Kenneth, 41 Dale Avenue, Ft. Thomas, 441-1475, 

635-2191 
Lenahan, Thomas F., 4309 Retreat Road, Louisville, 964- 

4636, 582-8696 
Levy, Arthur E., Route No. 2, Box 74-A, Williamson, W. Va., 

237-1171, 237-1010 
LeOuire, Harold, Woodland Hills, Harlan, 573-1 857, 573-51 51 
Lillie, William Westley, 3018 Taylorsville Road, Louisville, 

951-0562, 582-2658 
Lingo, Henry E., 424 W. Main, Vine Grove, 877-2346, 877- 

5537 
Linkes, Clifford C, Science Hill, 423-2171, 678-8111 
Lloyd, Birt Leonard, 4223 Auburn Road, Huntington, W. Va. 
Logan, Eli, 416 Hill, Hazard, 436-501 8, 436-2151 
Long, James E., P. O. Box 73, Basket, 827-5000, 827-1867 
Lovall, Tommy, 722 School Street, Tiptonville, Tennessee, 

253-6561, 253-7253 
Lotz, Robert William, 106 Buttercup Road, Louisville, 

239-3976, 634-9491 
Lowe, Gene T., Route No. 6, Box 28, London, 864-5724, 

864-2207 
Lowe, Stan, P. O. Box 337, Russellville, 726-6647, 242- 

6431 (Nashville, Tenn.) 
Lusby, George, 615 Pueblo Trail, Georgetown, 863-1440, 

863-1170 
Lykins, James O., 90 Allison Drive, Florence, 371-9531 
McCamish, Dan, Route No. 6, Box No. E-4, Locustwood 

Est., Lexington, 254-2209 
McCormick, Don R., Route No. 2, Vicki Way, Frankfort, 

223-5897, 223-5897 
McCormick, Donald, 1413 Helm Street, Henderson, 826- 

6314, 827 1792 
McCoy, Larry, 503 Wilderness Road, Louisville, 363-5180, 

459-8500 
McDougal, Alf, 7719 Kim Drive, Louisville, 363-5292, 

282-8961, Ext. 3101 
McFadden, Jimmie, 649 Northside Drive, Lexington, 299- 

1635, 254-9366 
McGehee, Gordon, 733 Forest Lane, Covington, 261-6880 
McGinty, L. V., Jr., P. O. Box 226, Pikeville, 437-4720, 

432-1226 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER 1969 



Page Eleven 



McKenzie, Robert L., 1809 Chestnut Street, Kenova, West 

Virginia 
McLane, Albert I., Route No. 1, Glendale, Cecilia 862-4579, 

862-3924 
McLemore, Jack T., 217 Merriman Road, Louisville, 893- 

5232, 584-1211 
McMillen, James N., 13th. & Carter Avenue, Ashland, 

836-8054, 324-6191 
McNamee, Jack, 3616 Muddycreek, Cincinnati, Ohio, 922- 

5207, 241-2777 
McPeek,Talmadge, 600 Bethann Drive, Flatwoods, 836-4540, 

836-5201 
Madon, Robert L., 314 Catalpa Street, Pineville, 337-2135, 

Frankfort 564-4610 
Magruder, Earl L., Jr., 6911 Oakview Ct„ Fern Creek, 

239-1015 
Major, Lucian, Route No. 4, Martin, Tennessee, 587-5828, 

885-2310 
Malcolm, Donald C, 1520 Ritter Blvd., Huntington, West 

Virginia 
Malone, James F., 200 Padgett, Corbin, 528-2424, 528-9019 
Maloney, Ross H., 6871 Green Meadow, Louisville, 893-2348, 

895-2020 
Marcum, Bruce, 1250 College Avenue, Barboursville, West 

Virginia 
Martin, Thomas F., 142 Park Street, Pikeville, 437-7994, 

437-4527 
Matarazzo, Salvatore M., 1602 Keenland Drive, Murray, 

753-8354, 762-3817 
Mathis, Mike, 8447 Foxcroft Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio, 522- 

9019, 562-6626 
Mattingly, Charles "Pete", 3813 Poplar Level, Louisville, 

459-5793, 448-2761 
May, E. B., Jr., P. O. Box 185, Prestonsburg, 886-3414, 

886-8661 
Mayhew, William M., 906 Pawnee Drive, Elizabethtown, 

765-2706, Fort Knox 4-4449 
Maynard, William D., 651 Indian Branch Road, Kenova, 

West Virginia 
Melmige, James, Jr., Box 21 17, Williamson, West Virginia 
Mercke, Frank R., 417 Lotis Way, Louisville, 896-8460, 

634-9491 
Mercker, George E., 803 Republic Bldg., Louisville, 451-8399, 

582-1645 
Metcalf, Ken, MunfordvMe, 524-9704, 524-9341 
Metzger, Don, 9312 Cloverwood Lane, Fern Creek, 239- 

9813, 239-9813 
Meyer, Bud, 5319 Lilibet Ct., Cincinnati, Ohio 
Mick, Paul Evers, P. O. Box 191, Marion, 965-2521, 965-4542 
Miller, Edward D., Jr., 6262 Rosalind Road, Huntington, W. 

Va. 
Millerhaus, W. J. "Bill", 537 Elberon, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

471-8467, 921-9722 
Minta, John H., 326 W. Carter, Clarksville, Tennessee, 

283-8553. 582-3571, Ext. 313 
Mollett, Danny N., 3266 Louisa Street, Catlettsburg, 739- 

4355, 324-8511, Ext. 731 
Moody, William R., 2032 Oleander Drive, Lexington, 277- 

9622, 255-5612 
Mooneyhan, James H., 810 Henry Street, Franklin. 586-4989, 

586-4451 
Moore, Franklin, 902 Walnut Street, Dayton, 291-6000, 

621-8770 
Moore, James A., 754 Bravington Way, Lexington, 277-6663, 

277-6115, Ext. 365 
Moore, Robert W., Jr., 441 Forest, Erlanger, 341-6837, 

563-1100 
Mordica, William A., 800 Edgewood Avenue, Ashland, 

324-7741, 324-7741 
Morgan, Jimmie Lee, 190 Oney Avenue, Huntington, West 

Virginia 
Morgan, Richard, Route No. 6, Box 64, London, 864-6511, 

864-5114 
Morris, Gene L., 302 Wilson Ct., Huntington, West Virginia 
Morris, Jerry, 2558 Harrison, Paducah, 443-2189. 443-7471 
Morrison, Clifton D., 1209 Balls Gap Road, Milton, West 

Virginia 
Morrissey, Rockne, 2012 Trentwood Cir., Dayton, Ohio 

433-3305, 271-0343 
Morrissey, Thomas, 120 Waxwing Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

791-6871 
Morse, Richard K., 163 N. Deepwood, Radcliff, 351-3748, 

Fort Knox 624-4454 
Moss, Howard, P. O. Box 1042, Paducah, 89 8-3168, 442-4474 
Mounts, David G., 217 Marlene Drive, Evansville, Indiana, 

423-6930, 423-7832 
Mullins, Charles E., Schultz Road, South Shore, 932-3388, 

932-3388 



Murray, Thomas, 25 Ashton Road, Ft. Mitchell, 331-1891, 

961-1691 
Nassida, Frank R., 108 Buckwood Drive, Richmond, 623- 

9209, 623-1212 
Neal, Gene, Route No. 1, Batavia, Ohio 
Nolan, Michael Bruce, 36 W. Morgantown Road, Bowling 

Green, 842-8978 
Noland, Douglas, 305 Herndon Avenue, Stanford, 365-2609, 

365-2619 
Nord, Bertrand J., 3006 Falmouth, Louisville, 459-6596, 

582-0241 
Nord, Gilbert, 2 809 Lencott, Louisville, 447-3133 
Norwood, Donald V., Strawberry, Route No. 6, Franklin, 

586-5119, 586-4636 
Norwood, Thomas Richard, 81 1 Henry Street, Franklin, 

586-3614, 586-3541 
Odil, William Randall, Route No. 6, Bowling Green, 7 81- 

3633, 843-1171 
Oldham, Ben R., 3360 High Hope Road, Lexington, 269- 

1563, 266-0115 
Omer, Billy Wynn, 250 Reed Avenue, Madisonville, 821-2833 
Omer, Harold G., 150 N. Crestmoor, Louisville. 
O'Nan, Norman, Route No. 1, Henderson 827-3968.826-9578 
O'Neal, Bud, 3628 Kelly Way, Louisville, 458-7940 
Orem, Dale L., 409 Chippewa Drive, Jeffersonville, Indiana 

283-8225, 636-4151 
Osborne, Ted G., Box 806, Lexington, 266-6152, 266-6152, 
Osting, James E., II, 7518 Yorktown Road, Louisville, 

368-9631, 584-9705, Ext. 231 
Osting, Lawrence J., 1221 Bates Court, Louisville, 451-2070 
Pace, Donald, 2023 Deauville, Lexington, 252-6535, 255- 

0398 
Pack, Keith, 510 Jackson, London, 864-7594, 864-5240 
Padgett, R. K., 112 Richardson Drive, Somerset, 678-5485, 

678-4141 
Page, James N., P. O. Box 64, Pineville, 337-3814, 337-3814 
Pardue, Israel L., 1005 So. 28th. Louisville, 772-2488, 774- 

6431 
Parker, Bob L., 8602 Honor Avenue, Louisville, 969-9090, 

587-1121, Ext. 586 
Parker, Francis V., 208 Rosemont, Providence, 667-2224, 

667-2224 
Parsley, Clyde E., Route No. 2, Providence, 667-2524, 

821-9004 
Pate, Llovd W., 608 Ronnie Road, Madison, Tennessee, 

895"-3522, 895-5472 
Patterson, Owen, 1331 Porter Drive, Henderson, 826-3206 
Paulk, John R., 1711 College Farm Road, Murray, 753-3078, 

924-5602 
Pawley, James Louis, 6000 Jessamine, Louisville, 935-2126, 

584-5201, Ext. 306 
Paxton, Gary R., Route No. 2, Versailles Road, Lexington. 

252-0507, 252-0507 
Peace, Richard L., Tennessee Avenue, Pineville, 337-2216, 

337-2216 
Peeno, Harry R., 124 Morris Road, Lookout Hts., Covington, 

331-1981 
Pegausch, William E., 301 Terrace Drive, Mayfield, 247-5932 , 

247-2267 
Pelham, Pete, 214 Oak, Dyersburg, Tennessee, 285-6649, 

285-2323 
Perkins, Ronnie L., Route No. 2, Upton, 373-5051, Elizabeth- 
town, 767-2311 
Perry, James W., 708 Spring Street, St. Albans, West Virginia 
Phipps, James M., P. O. Box 285, Hendrick, 546-6344, Corbin, 

528-3611 
Pietrowski, Paul, 108 Bishop, Corbin, 528-6391, 528-1630 
Pinson, Eugene, 3108 Hackworth St., Ashland, 324-6548, 

324-3101 
Pittman, Spencer, Science Hill, 423-3115, 678:4519 
Plate, Arthur, C, 6213 Kenwood Hills Dr., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

561-4105, 891-9091 
Poole, William F., Jr., 118 Ridgeway Avenue, Louisville, 

893-3863, 452-4556 
Porco, Kenneth John, 3924 Layside Drive, Louisville, 459- 

3455, 458-3281 
Powers, Clark V., Jr., 908 Walker. Paris, 987-5513, Fort 

Knox 4-1717 
Powers, Elmer, Route No. 2, Box 29 A., Ashland, 324-5485, 

325-8421 
Primm, James T., Route No. 1, Lafayette Road, Hopkinsville, 

885-9483 
Priode, Charles E. Route No. 3, Box 767, South Point Ohio. 

377-2289 
Pugh, Roy D.. 3510 Barclay Drive, Jeffersontown, 267-5513. 

964-5996 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER 1969 



Ramey, Roy, 312 N. Central Avenue, Prestonsburg, 886-2208, 

886-2284 
Randall, Leroy "Lee", Alexandria, 694-6446, 635-2191 
Ransford, Paul, Jr. ,729 Ricky Lane, Independence, 291-2781, 

356-5009 
Rapp, Bill, 1836 Woodland, Ironton, Ohio, 532-1983, 532- 

7245 
Rapp, Lowell D., 1416 So. 4th Street, Ironton, Ohio, 532- 

9575 
Raque, Ronald, 5300 Ronwood, Louisville, 964-2350, 637- 

9171 
Rawdon, Richard M., Jr., 401 E. College Street, Georgetown, 

863-3588, 863-0140 
Ray, Bob, 407 Leyton Avenue, Louisville, 425-7654, 425- 

7654 
Ray, Collis R., 809 N. 32nd., Paducah, 442-2146 
Ray, Shirley, 4521 Old Hartford Road, Owensboro, 684-8963, 

684-0104 
Read, Frederick K., 1338 Greenup, Covington, 431-5197, 

431-5197 
Reddington, Jim, 3824 Glenside Place, Louisville, 452-9689 
Redmon, C. Michael, 10819 Golden Drive, Valley Station, 

937-5567, 937-8750 
Reece, Fred, "Rock", 149 Elm Street, Versailles, 873-3623, 

Frankfort 564-4440 
Reece, Jerry T., McBrayer Road, Box 136, Clearfield, 784- 

9346, 564-3070 
Reed, Gordon "Moe", 22 Riverside Parkway, Ft. Thomas, 

441-4946 
Renfro, James H., 4035 Court Avenue, Paducah, 443-6611, 

444-63 11 
Reynolds, Robert C, Jr., 332 Condit Street, Ashland, 

325-2339, 325-8511, Ext. 853 
Rhodes, Cecil, P. O. Box 291, Barbourville, 546-4777 
Richardson, William H., 205 Fields Cliff Drive, Whitesburg, 

633-7217, 633-2339 
Riggins, Jason M., Jr., Box 417, Man, West Virginia 
Riggs, Charles Dennis, 3131 Sudbury Lane, Louisville, 

451-1278, 426-1767 
Ring, Bill, 481 Rookwood Parkway, Lexington, 299-7089, 

255-8492 
Roberson, Ron, Route No. 3, Box 329, Ashland. 928-8800 
Roberts, James E., 1019 Pawnee Drive, Elizabethtown, 

765-4739, 769-2311 
Robinson, D. Blake, P. O. Box 2462, Pikeville, 432-3269, 

437-62 86 
Robinson, Don L., 2012 Poplar Street, Kenova, West Virginia 
Rodgers, H. Tom, 327 Scott, MadisonvUle, 821-7312, 338- 

3800 
Roe, Doyle, Jr., "Buddy", Isom, 633-2973, 633-2961 
Roeckers, Bernard, 2738 Caledon Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

231-2603, 831-2990 
Rogers, Eldridge, 310 Talbert, Hopkinsville, 885-5571, 

885-3921 
Rogers, Selbert A., 1 5 Ford Street, Prestonsburg, 886-6297, 

886-3834 
Rolph, Harold J., 915 S. 7th., Ironton, Ohio, 532-4036, 

532-3231 
Rose, Robert L., 9806 Mary Dell Lane, Fern Creek, 239-0059 
Rouse, Donald, Box 714, Williamson, West Virginia 
Ruggles, James Gaylord, P. O. Box 374, Winslow, Indiana, 

789-2551 
Rupp, Larry D., 3309 Wellingmoor Avenue, Louisville, 

451-3350, 452-3583 
Russell, Gary E., 2112 Gregory Drive, Henderson, 827-2437 
Russell, Joe A., Box 213, RusseUville, 726-6983, 726-9531 
Russman, Godfrey F., Jr., 1041 Goss Avenue, Louisville, 

969-2175, 635-7426 
St. Clair, James W., 1 500 Fifth Avenue, Huntington, West 

Virginia 
Sale, Jack, 604-1 2th. Avenue, Huntington, W«st Virginia 
Salyer, Henry E., 4817 Bluebird Avenue, Louisville, 969-6371, 

634-1511, Ext. 71 
Sammons, Terry Lynn, 4308 Burnt Cedar Lane, Louisville, 

964-0852, 587-1121, Ext. 252 
Sanders, Mel, 4300 Kimberly Ct., Paducah, 442-3650, 

564-4081 
Sapp, Edward, 2806 Dell Brooke Avenue, Louisville, 458- 

8989, 452-3828 
Satterly, Grant G., 832 Shelby Street, Frankfort, 223-3810 
Saylors, Carlee, Route No. 6, Murray, 753-7979, 924-5602 
Schad, James, 816 Yorkhaven Road, Springdale, Ohio, 825- 

3343, 825-3397 
Schmidt, Henry, 3509 Locklee Road, Louisville, WE 7-3625 
Schmitt, K. F., 710 E. Walnut, Louisville, 772-0131, 584- 

8269 
Schmitt, Paul E., 3864 Darlene Drive, Louisville, 778-5355, 

^72-3656 



Schoenbaechler, Richard, 5612 Indian Oaks Cr., Apt. No. 2, 

Louisville, 964-0298 
Schuble, Charles E., 2352 Ashwood, Louisville, 459-1774, 

636-1431 
Schutte, Joseph C, 1828 Appleton Lane, Louisville, 448- 

7565, 583-4413 
Sconce, John, Lynch, 848-2250 
Scott, BUI, 1816 McDonald Road, Lexington, 278-2844, 

254-1313 
Seavers, Joe, 2517 Ann Street, Ludlow, 341-0213, 291-8925 
Selvy, Curt, 118 Earl, Corbin, 528-4677, 528-3737 
Sexton, Steven Carroll, 9126 Edmonston, Greenbelt, Md., 

474-4591, 964-4815 
Shanks, Thomas E., 31 13 Vogue Avenue, Louisville, 454-4203, 

582-5514 
Sharp, Ronnie, Box 304, Middlesboro, 248-3910, 248-3450 
Shaughnessy, Bernard, 2129 East Lane, Louisville, 448-4923, 

583-4854, Ext. 21 
Shaw, Earl, 121 Hagan Court, Lancaster, 792-2370, 548-3391 
Shewmaker, Wayne, 206 W. Meadow Drive, Clarksville, 

Tennessee, 647-7351 
Showalter, John, 116 Military, Georgetown, 863-1892 
Simms, Clarence E., 610 Linden, Newport, 261-0735, 243- 

3104 
Sinkewitz, George J., 1511 Franklin Street, Huntington, West 

Virginia 
Sizemore, Aster, 29 Sunvalley Terrace, Hazard, 436-3402, 

436-2107 
Sligh, Jim, 607 Sherwood Road, Cynthiana, 234-4345, 

724-2301 
Sloan, Wallace, 419 Oread Road, Louisville, 895-1126, 

583-0621 
Slone, Earl D., Route No. 1, Box 10 D, Corbin, 528-4197, 

528-9038 
Small, David E., 2216 Janlyn Road, Louisville 
Smith, Bill H. 7003 Sun Valley Drive, Valley Station, 

937-7192, 587-6035 
Smith, Robert E., 3107 Wedgewood Way, Louisville, 45 8-3623 
Smith, William E., 4122 St. John's Tr., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

791-3082, 731-2341, Ext. 268 
Snyder, Bernard, 1253 Burnett Avenue, Louisville, 637-8989 
Somerville, Robert J., 6852 Greenmeadow Circle, Louisville , 

895-8003, 583-3859 
South, Stanley P., Route No. 3, Winchester, 842-6132, 

744-4812 
Spath, William Joseph, 4019 Rosemont Avenue, Louisville, 

452-9637, 584-5209 
Spauling, Johnny R., P. O. Box 101, Catlettsburg, 739-5095, 

325-8511, Ext. 326 
Speaks, Carl, P. O. Box 54, Stanford, 365-2812, 365-7275 
Stark, Dennis W., 158 Bonnie Brae, Lexington, 252-2933 
Starling, Edward, 819 Vinson Street, Williamson, West Vir- 
ginia 
Staten, Joe B., 4303 Wayola Ct., Louisville, 458-7454 
Stephenson, Harry S., 1612 Hawthorn, Lexington, 299-1757, 

233-8310 
Stephenson, Herbert D., 133 First Street, West Ceredo, West 

Virginia 
Stevens, William D., 1033 Claiborne Way, Lexington, 266- 

2578, 299-1221, Ext. 2223 
Stewart, Roy Edward, 1872 Dunkirk Drive, Lexington, 255- 

0448, 255-6812, Ext. 311 
Stewart, William W., 112 Seneca Trail, Louisville, 367-1450 
Strain, Richard P., P. O. Box 472, Radcliff, 351-4306, 

624-2214 
Streible, Ronnie, 148 Penmoken, Lexington 
Strong, Arnett, 116 Ky. Blvd., Hazard, 436-3938, 436-2141 
Stumbo,Jack, 1146 Riverview Lane, Prestonsburg, 886-3363, 

886-3080 
Stuart, Joe G., Ill, 153 Pennsylvania Avenue, Louisville, 
897-1045, 584-4221 
Sucietto, Dick, 6572 Gaines Road, Cincinnati, Ohio, 521 

7495, 761-4130, Ext. 310 
Sullivan, A. G., 1921 Goodwin Avenue, Corbin, 528-1282, 

528-9035 
Sullivan, Don Chris, 2083 Old Nassau Road, Lexington, 277- 

6953, 277-6953 
Swarts, Joseph, 135 Lane Street, Ironton, Ohio, 532-9349 
Swinford, John, 106 S. Elmarch, Cynthiana, 234-2562, 234- 

5820 
Tackett, George, Lothair Station, Hazard, 436-2703, 436-31 91 
Talbot, William G., Ill, RR No. 1, Paris, 465-4981, 987-2961 
Taylor, Charles Gehrig, Bardstown, 348-9451, 348-9031 
Taylor, James R., 1901 Ballard Street, Ashland, 324-4841, 

324-2175 
Thomas, Paul E., P. O. Box 435 A, Franklin Furnace, Ohio, 

574-5111, 574-5111 
Thomas, Raymond E., 1106 Main Street, Sturgis, 333-2151 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER 1969 



Page Thirteen 



Thompson, Jack, 2347 Saratoga Drive, Louisville, 452-9255, 

454-45 85 
Thompson, Tom Droege, 97 Carran Drive, Ft. Mitchell, 

341-1809, 581-1322, Ext. 211 
Timmering, George E., 4109 Manner Gate Drive, Louisville, 

459-2705, 776-5725 
Trapp, Charles W., 34 Trapp Court, Alexandria, 635-9250, 

635-9250 
Treas, Joe W., 609 Green Street, Fulton, 472-1604, 472-1 836 
Treibly, Charles E., 2015 Terril Lane, No. 44, Louisville, 

451-8448, 451-9301 
Trimer, Norman, 1927 Taffeta Drive, Valley Station, 937- 

4452, 447-9165 
Turner, Charles W., 5516 Jeanine Drive, Louisville, 969-3019 
Urlage, Richard, 822 Highland, Ft. Thomas, 441-5513, 471- 

8120 
VanZant Jim, Box 602, Williamson, West Virginia 
Varner, Ray G., 737 Kingston Road, Lexington 299-4145, 
Vennell, Robert H., 2055 Donald Avenue, Huntington, West 

Virginia 
Vissman, Charles F. 3926 Graf Drive, Louisville, 458-8501, 

587-1121, Ext. 374 
Wagner, Jim, 3018 Dale Ann Drive, Louisville, 458-9060, 

637-2563 
Waide, Harry D., 973 Skyline Drive, Madisonville, 821-1139, 

821-3870 
Walker, Julian R., 670 Hill-n-Dale Road, Lexington, 277-7269, 

Frankfort 564-4840 
Walker, Paul R., Reservoir Hill Park, 10th. & High Streets, 

Bowling Green, 843-8893, 843-3249 
Waller, Bobbie E., 309 Strathmore, Lexington, 299-6123, 

299-6123 
Wanchic, Nicholas, 1511 Forbes Road, Lexington, 255-1233, 

255-6812 
Ward, Tommy, Harlan, 573-4653, 573-3711 
Warren, Bige R., Walker, 542-2224 
Warren, Buist "Buzz", 4043 Park Road, Fort Knox, 624-2098, 

624-1231 
Warren, Kenneth, A., 45 Meadowview Drive, Louisville, 

454-5001, 634-1551, Ext. 275 
Washaleski, Tom, 3914 Delia Fay, Louisville, 964-6920, 

361-1256 
Washer, James Preston, 41 19 Sunflower, Louisville, 447-6817, 

969-2391 
Washer, Robert Stanley, Jr., 3205 Huberta Drive, Louisville, 

447-3078, 582-8587 
Watts, Shirley R„ 228 St. Ann, Lexington, 266-1749, 254- 

4017 
Weaver, Clyde Ivan, Box 254, Williamson, West Virginia 
Weaver, Ray, 3117 Bernard Drive, Edgewood, 341-2610, 

341-8066 
Webb, Dudley, 905 Summerville Drive, Lexington, 257-2090, 

254-7318 
Weber, Thomas C, 3707 St. Germaine, Louisville, 896-4298 
Webner, J. Randall, 607 Wallace Avenue, Louisville 
Werkowitz, Jack, 4614 Miller, Blue Ash, Ohio, 791-5382, 

791-5870 
Wheeler, Mellington, 1019 Poplar Street, Kenova, West 

Virginia 
White, John Stanley, 1517 Fairfax Drive, Ashland, 325-2090, 

325-2090 
Whitt, Hobert E., Jr., P. O. Box 612, Russell, 836-3575, 

836-4212 
Wickham, James Robert, 311 Cathedral Manor, Bardstown, 

348-5282, 833-4611 
Wilbert, Donald A., 4420 Santa Paula Lane, Louisville, 

969-8733, 448-2761 
Willey, Harold L., 2214 Inwood Drive, Huntington, West Vir- 
ginia 
Williams, James H., Elmwood Drive, South Shore, 932-4372, 

Portsmouth, Ohio 353-7440 
Willis, Donald A., P. O. Box 5, Allen, 874-2485, 285-3407 
Wilson, John Pope, 812 E. Main Street, Louisville, 585-4591, 

245-4121, Ext. 455 
Wilson, Louis, 728 Wellington Way, Lexington, 277-6374, 

252-7585 
Wise, Jack, 209 Pocahontas, Georgetown, 863-3948, 863- 

0772 
Witsken, Roger Lawrence, 4321 St. Dominic Drive, Cincinnati , 

Ohio, 471-6312, 421-5100, Ext -"57 
Whittenburg, Howard, 2401 Edgewood Drive, Portsmouth 

Ohio, 353-4918, 353-2186 
Wood, F. Blake, Route No. 1, Box 444-CC, Elkview, West 

Virginia 
Wood, Walter A., 562 Stonehaven Drive, Lexington 
Wray, Robert, 29 Belle Monte, Ft. Mitchell, 341-1778, 

431-3200, Ext. 62 
Wright, Howard L., 309 Forest, Erlanger, 341-4396 



Wright, James L., 121 Showalter Drive, 863-3628, 233-2000, 

Ext. 3813 
Wright, John David, 442 Mclean Avenue, Hopkinsville, 

885-9915, 886-3921 
Wulfeck, James, 111 Burdsall, Ft. Mitchell, 331-3599, 

261-4300 
Yarbrough, Roy Dean, Jr., 163 Lakeshore Drive, Apt. No. 12 

Lexington 
Yost, Carl W., P. O. Box 421, Brandenburg, 422-2661, 422- 

2661, 422-2101, Ext. 381 
Young, Jack, 121 Smith Ballard, Richmond, 623-4589, 623- 

2334 
Zimmer, Thomas, 114 Summit Drive, Ft. Mitchell, 341-4566, 

431-4272 
Zlamal, Raymond K., 541 Johnson Avenue, Lynch, 848-5966 
Zogg, Joe F., Box 1218, Owensboro, 683-01 52, 683-1298 

1969 FOOTBALL PUBLICATIONS 

Corrections and Interpretations 

RULES BOOK 

Inside Front Cover-9-3i-replace last word "score" with 
"touchdown." 
CASE BOOK 

Play 6-Item and ruling for (b) are correct as given in the 
case book. Note block by A4 is from side and, therefore, 
legal. 

Play 263D-The last sentence of the ruling should read, 
"After the game has begun, the referee has no alternative ex- 
cept to penalize the team for failure to wear the required 
equipment." Delete the clause "and after a team has been 
warned." 
RULES-SIMPLIFIED AND ILLUSTRATED 

Top of Page 45-Insert after "yard" the following, "or V4 
the distance to the goal (as it is in this situation)." 

Top of Page 56-In third line of the caption delete "goal" 
and replace with "10." 
INTERPRETATIONS BASED ON RECENT CHANGES 

1. Play: Team A is on the line ready to snap when several 
B players loudly call out numbers in cadence and: (a) the ball 
is snapped on the first sound from the quarterback and a pass 
results in a touchdown; or (b) the action by B upsets the tim- 
ing of A and Al false starts. 

Ruling: Unsportsmanlike conduct by B in both (a) and 
(b). This is a dead ball foul. The ball will not be permitted to 
become alive. Since this is a dead ball foul, there is no result 
of the play to accept in (a). B will be penalized 15 yards from 
the previous spot in both (a) and (b). 

2. Play: (a) At the beginning of the 3rd quarter; or (b) 
following a substitution, team K has 12 men on the field 
when the ball becomes alive. 

Ruling: Illegal participation in both (a) and (b). Because 
K had 12 men on the field during a down, the foul is for 
illegal participation whether or not there was an attempt to 
deceive. This became a foul when the ball became alive, that 
is, when it was kicked or snapped. Penalize 1 5 yards from 
the previous spot if the penalty is accepted. 

3. Play: As the ball becomes dead it is immediately noted 
that Al participated without a tooth and mouth protector. 

Ruling: The foul by Al is considered to have occurred 
simultaneously with the snap. The penalty is 15 yards which, 
if accepted, will be assessed from the previous spot. Team B 
has the choice of refusing the penalty, taking the play, and 
counting the down. 

4. Play: (a) Bl has his helmet inadvertently dislodged 
during the play; or (b) A3 purposely discards his helmet 
during the down. 

Ruling: In (a), the accidental or inadvertent displacement 
of required equipment during the course of a down is ignored. 
The equipment must, of course, be replaced for the start of 
the succeeding down. In (b), it is a foul for not properly 
wearing required equipment. The foul takes place at the spot 



Page Fourteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER 1969 



the player voluntarily removes his equipment. The penalty is 
assessed on the basis of the type of play and will depend upon 
whether the foul occurred during a running play or loose ball 
play and when the foul occurred. 

5. Play: During the game representatives of team A are: 
(a) taking 16mm movies; or (b) using a portable video tape 
recorder in the press box to record the game for future refer- 
ence; or (c) using a Polaroid camera to take single pictures of 
defensive formations; or (d) using a Polaroid camera with an 
adapter for taking sequence pictures. 

Ruling: Legal in (a) and (b), provided in (b) the tape is 
not used for coaching purposes at any time during the game 
and that a representative of the team does not study replays 
on a monitor and pass information about them to the coach- 
ing staff during the game, (c) and (d) become illegal if infor- 
mation from any of the pictures is relayed to any member of 
the squad during the course of the game. 

6. Play: During a try, place-kick holder Al muffs the 
snap. A2 recovers and crosses the goal line. During the down, 
A3 held Bl on B's 5 yardline. 

Ruling: B is given the option of accepting the result of the 
play, which would be the award of 2 points for the successful 
try, or taking the penalty. The penalty, if accepted, will be 
measured from the spot of the foul and the try will be re- 
played from B's 20. This is a foul during a running play and is 
administered according to the All but One principle. 



The Unconscious Athlete 

The common definition of "first aid" is: The immediate 
emergency care of injury or illness until medical care can be 
obtained. This is especially significant with regard to the 
player rendered unconscious during an athletic contest or 
practice. 

Medical care should be immediately available with a 
physician present at games and readily available during 
practice sessions. This requires that plans be developed so 
that during practices the physician can be reached quickly 
by phone. The unconscious player can pose a serious problem 
and the physician, the coach and the trainer must realize the 
importance of prompt and proper care. 

There are a number of conditions that may cause uncon- 
sciousness. These conditions and recommendations for care 
are listed below: 

Heat Stroke-Collapse-with dry, warm skin-indicates 
sweating mechanism failure and rising body temperature. 
THIS IS AN EMERGENCY; DELAY COULD BE FATAL. 
Immediately cool athlete by the most expedient means 
(immersion in cool water is best method). Obtain medical 
care at once. Player should not return to participation 
without consent of a physician. 

Heat Exhaustion-Weakness-with profuse sweating-indi- 
cates state of shock due to depletion of salt and water. Place 
in shade with head level or lower than body. Give sips of 
dilute salt water. Obtain medical care at once. Player should 
not return to participation without consent of a physician. 

Impact Blow to Solar Plexus- Rest athlete on back and 
moisten face with cool water. Loosen clothing around waist 
and chest. Do nothing else except obtain medical care if 
needed. Player may return to participation if further medical 
care is not indicated. 

Impact Blow to Head-Head injuries-in football are 
usually "subconcussive." That is, the player may be briefly 
dazed or slow to get up. He may be groggy or dizzy for only 
a few moments. Such a player should be benched for at least 
two plays, preferably a quarter, and not returned to play until 
he is alert, fully in command of himself, and free of head- 
ache or dizziness. 



With a definite loss of consciousness, the player should be 
taken to a neurosurgical facility where he can be observed 
for a twenty-four hour period for any evidence of intracranial 
bleeding. He should not be returned to football until he is 
completely free of symptoms such as headache or dizziness. 

The following recommendations should be followed con- 
cerning possible head injuries: 

The groggy or dizzy player should be removed from the 
game until he is fully in command of himself and free of 
headache and dizziness. 

Any player who has had a definite loss of consciousness 
should be removed and observed in a hospital for 24 hours. 

When in doubt about the condition of the player, it is 
wise to pull him out, at least for a period of observation on 
the bench. 

Headache persisting after any head injury requires careful 
medical evaluation. 

Any inequality of pupil size developing after a head injury 
calls for immediate neurosurgical examination. 

The following simple observations should be conducted 
to determine if there is an expanding intracranial lesion: 

1. State of Consciousness- How impared are movements? 

2. Pupils-Inequality of size. 

3. Heart-Unusual slowing. 

4. Eye Movements-Nystagmus (dancing eyes) 

5. Outstretched Arms-Drift unilaterally 

6. Finger to Nose Test (eyes closed)-Asymmetry 

7. Heel to Knee Test (eyes closed) -Asymmetry 

8. Romberg Test (standing with eyes closed) -Falling 

9. Tandem Walk (Heel to toe walking a straight line)— 
Inability to perform. 

Three cardinal points to be stressed for successful emer- 
gency treatment are: 

1. Communication: A "non-pay" telephone close to the 
sports arena for quick calls for help. 

2. Transportation: A vehicle must be available at the site 
of competition to move the patient to the hospital. 

3. Notification: The hospital must be informed of the 
patient's status so that medical, nursing and the proper 
facilities will be available on his arrival. 

REFERENCES: 

1. First Aid Chait For Athletic Injuries, American Medical 
Association Committee on the Medical Aspects of Sports. 

2. Schneider, R. C„M.D. and Kriss, F. G., M.D., Decisions 
Concerning Cerebral Concussions in Football Players, Medi- 
cine and Science in Sports, Vol. 1 No. 2, June 1969. 

3. Van den Noort, G., M.D., Recognition and Earlv 
Management of Head and Neck Injuries in Football, Pro- 
ceeding of the Seventh National Conference on the Medical 
Aspects of Sports, American Medical Association, November 
28, 1965. 

-A.M.A. and the National Federation 



An Educational Discipline 

By Dr. William Pearson Tolley 
President, Syracuse University 

NOTE : The following comments on football as a discipline 
were made to the 1968 annual meeting of the American Foot- 
ball Coaches Association by Dr. William Pearson Tolley, Presi- 
dent, Syracuse University. His remarks are reproduced here 
through the courtesy of the American Football Coaches 
Association. They will be of interest to everyone involved in 
the athletic programs of education institutions. 

The debate over the place of major sports on campus has 
been raging for years, most of the time with more heat than 
light. The critics say that there is a basic conflict between 
academic excellence and excellence in athletics; that scholarly 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER 1969 



Page Fifteen 



ettort cannot flourish where there is a serious interest in 
football. This is nonsense. Without question, there are institu- 
tions where the proper balance is not maintained and where 
emphasis on athletics has precedence over academic achieve- 
ment. It is the bad example of these institutions that gives 
rise to the argument for abolishing intercollegiate athletics 
and particularly football. That argument cannot be taken 
seriously by onyone with a firsthand knowledge of youth. It 
may be an answer for the birds, it will not do for men. 

To see football and other sports in better perspective, I 
should like to raise some different questions. What is the 
place of discipline in American education? How important 
is performance as distinguished from potential? What is the 
relationship of the individual to the larger units of society? 
And do sports contribute to the search for courage, endur- 
ance, honesty and self-respect? 

Let us turn to the first question. What is the place of 
discipline in American education? We are free men. We are 
committed to freedom of speech, freedom of the press, 
freedom of religion, and freedom of the mind. Is there a place 
for discipline? The answer is to be found in the sincere labor- 
atory where to understand a universe under law requires hard 
work, patience and accuracy. It is only the disciplined mind 
that is equipped to observe, analyze, reflect and put back 
together again. The life of the scientist is the life of strict 
discipline. Only by long and ardous training does anyone 
contribute to the advancement of science. 

Again on the playing field there is no instant knowledge, 
no immediate leadership and influence, no short cuts to 
success and power. Skill comes only after endless hours of 
running, push ups, drill and practice. Poise comes with 
experience. Experience is gained at the expense of mistakes. 
Self-control is the product of effort. Leadership is earned, 
not given. 

Whether American parents are too permissive, their 
children too rebellious and the Nation too undiciplined and 
soft only time will tell. But even the youngster who has never 
been crossed learns the place of discipline in a science 
laboratory and he learns it again on the playing field. William 
Penn said: no pain no palm, no thorns no crown, no call no 
glory, no cross no crown. 

The New Testament reminds us that, "Strait is the gate, 
and narrow is the way, which leadeth unto life, and few 
there be that find it." (Matthew VII, v. 14). To learn this by 
personal experience is particularly important in a day of 
affluence and ease. 

Our second question is, How important is performance as 
distinguished from potential? For the moment, American 
Society is preoccupied with the problem of undeveloped po- 
tential. This is the great problem of both our schools and 
our colleges. Nature is lavish in its distribution of talents-but 
poor schools leave talents undeveloped and students seriously 
disadvantaged. 

I agree that this is the current problem in our slums and 
backward areas. I do not share the feeling that it is our only 
problem. In education there must always be an emphasis 
on performance as well as potential. If I were an admissions 
officer, a boy's performance in the high school classroom 
would tell me far more than his scores in College Boards. 

What counts most in life is motivation. This is what makes 
the difference both in the classroom and on the playing field. 
Desire, competitive spirit, a willingness to pay the price, 
habits of work, the refusal to quit, these are the qualities we 
should look for. 

Only performance counts in the classroom. Only perfor- 
mance counts on the playing field. Only performance counts 
in life after graduation. This is the lesson we must all learn. 
The earlier it is learned, the better it will be for the learner. 

On balance I thirik our coaches teach this lesson even more 



effectively than do our other teachers. The New Testament 
reminds us that, "I am the true vine, and my Father is the 
vinedresser. Every branch of mine that bears no fruit, he 
takes away, and every branch that does bear fruit he prunes, 
that it may bear more fruit." (John XV, v. 1,2) Every week 
the football coach judges every boy that plays. Every week he 
takes away the branch that bears no fruit, prunes the one that 
does so that it will bear more fruit. He may not realize it, but 
this cruel hard-nosed doctrine comes straight from the Good 
Book. 

My third question is, What is the relationship of the 
individual to the larger units of society? In dealing with the 
current generation of students, one cannot help but be im- 
pressed by the extent to which they are wrapped up in them- 
selves. Perhaps this has always been true. One has to go back 
a long way in time, however, to find such a high percentage 
of egocentric student leaders. What they regard as important 
appears to be all that counts. They have answers but no ques- 
tions, voices but no ears. They know more than their teachers, 
more than the administrators and much more than the 
trustees. 

Fortunately they are brought back to earth on the playing 
field if nowhere else. Discipline and the place of performance 
can be learned in the classroom quite as well as on the playing 
field. Nothing, however, teaches the importance of teamwork 
like athletics. The subordination of the individual to the 
team is an experience I wish all students could have. The boy 
who obeys instructions, who listens and learns, who gives 
his best effort in any position to which he is assigned and who 
hangs in there every day and every week regardless of how 
much he plays on Saturday, this is the boy who finds out 
what life is all about. 

In the closing years of the twentieth century, scientific 
advance is more and more the result of team effort. Again, 
every social and economic advance requires cooperative 
action. This is becoming a day when even the most gifted 
must function as a member of a team. I am grateful that 
this all important lesson is taught so well on the playing 
field. 

And finally, Do sports contribute to the search for 
courage, endurance, honesty and self-respect? 

The most notable weakness of American higher education 
is in the field of character training. We do an outstanding job 
in intellectual discipline-a miserable job in moral discipline. 
Education that is complete must take into account the needs 
of the whole man. The molding of character, the contagion 
of ideals, the teaching of values often takes place outside of 
the classroom but this does not make it any the less impor- 
tant. It comes from the force of example, from the personal 
influence of those whom students respect, and from direct 
personal involvement. 

Here again the science laboratory could be cited- for ac- 
curacy, truthfulness, and honesty are requirements without 
excuse or exception. But the playing field teaches these 
qualities too, and in addition teaches courage, endurance 
and self-respect. 

I would be the first to admit that we put too high a pre- 
mium on winning. The British ask, "Did you have a good 
game?" We ask, "Did you win?" In America when the season 
ends, nothing is important but the record of victories and 
defeats. 

Aristotle, in arguing for a golden mean in his Nicomachean 
Ethics, observed that many vices are really good qualities 
pushed to extremes. Thrift becomes parsimony, generosity 
becomes prodigal spending, freedom becomes license, right- 
eousness grows self-righteous, riligious devotion becomes 
fanatical and intolerant. 

I would agree that some of the values in the world of 
sport are out of balance. But it is not the coaches who have 



Page Sixteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER 1969 



distorted values, it is the alumni ana the lans. There isn't a 
coach here who wouldn't welcome increased attention to good 
sportsmanship and less attention to the final score. But 
when the failure to win means the loss of your job, someone 
is kidding you if he says victory is not important. 

Even so it is not so important that the end justifies any 
means. Long after boys have graduated they will remember 
their coaches resorted to cheating to win. Boys learn only the 
kind of sportsmanship they see exemplified. They are never 
fooled. 

Among the coaches I have been privileged to know, how- 
ever, the standards are what they should be and one reaches 
out for the highest values in a shared experience. The con- 
tribution to the building of character is enormous. The 
lessons of obedience, of loyalty, of courage-all three are 
learned, as well as the value of a total response. To do what 
you thought couldn't be done, to give that last extra effort 
that makes so great a difference, to endure without whining 
or complaint, to practice until perfect, to make the key block 
that lets your teammate score-these are experiences 1 wish 
everyone could have. 

For each one of us there is a desert to travel, a star to 
discover, and a being within ourselves to bring to life. The 
boy who gives all that he has not only brings to life the 
highest being within him, but gives hope for all human 
striving. And as he learns the meaning of honesty and self- 
respect, he is rewarded with pride and dignity and honor. 

There should be no doubt how the questions I have 
raised are answered. They are the answers that justify the 
investment of your life in coaching. They make the struggle 
worthwhile. 



To Win What? 

Much has been said and written about creating a desire to 
win as an important objective in interscholastics. Coaches 
make it an immediate objective and educators have acknow- 
ledged that a desire to win is significant in developing a will 
to succeed. Conference and state championships stimulate a 
desire to win, but few have raised the question, "To Win 
What?" 

A concept of victory that appears to be prevalent is to 
prove the individual, or the team, superior in physical skill 
as evidenced by the mark or the score. Too many fail to 
realize that victory can be great or it can be shallow. For 
example, most would readily admit that a victory by cheat- 
ing would have little real value. 

What are we trying to win? This is an easy question for 
the professionals and they can answer it honestly. Their 
objective is to win a reward, generally of a monetary or 
material nature. The winner gets the major share of the 
reward but the loser also shares. 

What about interscholastics? No doubt, interscholastics 
are influenced by professional athletic programs. We substi- 
tute an "award" for the reward. By standard, it must be 
symbolic in nature in the form of a medal or trophy. For 
what does the award stand? It symbolizes victory. To be a 
victor one must have displayed superiority in individual or 
team skills. There is nothing wrong in the desire to win 
an award based on victory. It is our attitude toward victory 
that can be questioned. If the award is all that we are 
competing for, victory has little significance in the inter- 
scholastic program. 

Questionable attitudes toward victory in school programs 
generally involve attitudes of excess. An excessive display of 
an attitude of superiority can bring ill will and disrespect 
toward the victor. Over glorification of the champion can 
cause a false sense of importance of victory for high school 
youth. 



An interscholastic victory must be a worthwhile learning 
experience if it is to be significant in an educational program. 
Whether it will be a learning experience will largely depend 
upon the teaching by the coach and school representatives. 
School administrators have the responsibility of seeing that 
students are taught how to accept victory. They must realize 
that winning shall be an experience that will make for better 
citizenship. If it does not, what has been won? 

High school players and students and adult spectators 
must understand how the loser feels. The loser should have a 
share from an interscholastic contest just as losers share in 
professional athletics. Instead of monetary or material gain, 
they should share in the respect and recognition of their 
dignity. Winners must realize that learning how to accept 
defeat graciously without wanting to lose requires as much 
courage and character as does winning. That has often been 
portrayed by the old adage of "being humble in victory and 
gracious in defeat." 

High school students are sometimes confused by some of 
the acts of the professionals in the form of cutting nets from 
goals, etc. This showmanship performed by the professionals 
to add to the entertainment being sold. Destruction of school 
property is a violation of the law, and victors in interscholas- 
tic athletics should never acquire an attitude that victory 
justifies a violation of the law. 

If winning in interscholastics is to be worthwhile, we 
must cause students to look beyond the award, the glory 
and the pride that comes easy from winning. They must be 
conscious of more than just a desire to win; they must fully 
understand what is to be won, and they must be given help 
to assume the responsibility of being a winner. Building the 
proper attitudes toward winning and losing is a responsibility 
of the school, and particularly of the coaching staff. 
-Missouri H. S. Activities Journal 



New Wrestling Film 

A new wrestling film, WRESTLING BY THE RULES, has 
been produced by the National Federation of State High 
School Athletic Associations. The film was released in July 
of this year. A print of the film, a 16mm, 18 minute sound 
film in color, has been secured by the K.H.S.A.A. and placed 
on loan with the Film Library, College of Education, Univer- 
sity of Kentucky. 

WRESTLING BY THE RULES is a movie with commen- 
tary which is devoted in its entirety to wrestling rules inter- 
pretations and officiating procedures. The film covers those 
difficult judgment situations which occur instantaneously 
during a typical wrestling match. There are more than 60 
scenes which provide guidelines for officiating such areas as 
takedowns, reversals, stalling, technical violations, and illegal 
holds. 

Authenticity of the interpretations is guaranteed since 
the high school members of the NCAA Wrestling Rules 
Committee, along with its chairman and secretary, served as 
the technical staff. Also serving in an advisory capacity were 
high school coaches and officials who are currently active and 
well versed on the scene. 

WRESTLING BY THE RULES provides a visual approach 
to the written rules, and situations covered in the film were 
chosen from suggestions made by coaches and officials. It is 
produced to help everyone understand those difficult judg- 
ment decisions which officials must make instantaneously. 
The film is a supplement to WRESTLING OFFICIATING 
ILLUSTRATED and will serve as a valuable visual aid in 
college officiating classes. With the exception of high school 
modifications, the interpretations, as given in the 3Slm, are 
correct for the intercollegiate level of the sport. It is recom- 
mended for all levels of amateur wrestling. 



AS SCHOOL BELLS RING OUT, THERE IS THE EXCITE 
MENT OF A FORTHCOMING YEAR OF LEARNING, 
EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES AND ALL THE SPE- 
CIAL ACTIVITIES THAT COME DURING THE SCHOOL 
YEAR. IT IS A TIME OF AN INCREASING NUMBER OF 
ACCIDENTS. CERTAINLY YOU ARE PLANNING AND 
TAKING PRECAUTIONS TO INSURE THE SAFETY AND 
WELL-BEING OF ALL SCHOOL CHILDREN. 

THIS IS A GOOD TIME TO MAKE A THOROUGH EXAMI- 
NATION OF YOUR INSURANCE POLICY AND MAKE 
SURE YOU UNDERSTAND THE COVERAGE AND THAT 
THE INSURANCE YOU HAVE FITS YOUR NEEDS. 

WE HOPE THAT THE COMING YEAR WILL BE ONE OF 
SAFETY AND SUCCESS FOR ALL SCHOOLS. WE WOULD 
LIKE TO EXPRESS OUR THANKS TO ALL OUR CUS- 
TOMERS AND PLEDGE A YEAR OF CONTINUED SER- 
VICE AND INTEREST IN YOUR PROBLEMS. 



W. E. KINGSLEY 



J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. 
Life Department 



121-123 LAFAYETTE AVE 
P.O. BOX 7100 



LEXINGTON, KY. 40502 



GENERAL AGENT 
CHARLES C. PRICE 

PHONE 254-4095 



51 YEARS 



FOR ATHLETES 

In August, 1918, our founder, Bill Hunt, was asked to help secure some 
uniforms for a football team so they could tell the spectators from the 
players. 

For 5 1 years we at Hunt's have tried to serve the athletes by finding for 
them the best available equipment to serve their needs. 

Today we feature and can supply immediate delivery on merchandise for any 
athletic or physical education need from our warehouse. 

We have complete stock of the following items. 

Football Shoes sizes 1 to 14 

Basketball Shoes sizes 1 to 1 7 

Football Pants sizes 22 to 52 

Football Jerseys sizes 4 to 50 

Football Shoulder Pads sizes Little League to 50 

Basketball Jerseys sizes 10 to 50 

Basketball Pants sizes Little League to College 

Athletic Socks sizes 6 to 1 6 

Football Helmets sizes Boys Extra Small to 8 

Football— Rubber or Leather-Little League to Pro 
Basketballs— Indoor or Outdoor— Biddy to Pro 
Fair Play Scoreboards— Grade School to College 
First Aid for prevention or treatment 

We specialize in your problems. 

Next day delivery to any school in Kentucky. 

Call on our experience and service with your problems. 

In Mayfield, 247-1941 COLLECT. 

One of us can help you. 

C. A. BYRN, JR.-ROY BOYD-JIM MITCHELL-EDDIE THOMIS 

JENNY SIMPSON-ELIZABETH RULE-NANNIE LOU USREY 

SONDRA CISSEL-HENRY BOMAR 



HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO., Inc. 

CH 7-1941 — PHONES — CH 7-1942 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 





Hi qh School Athlete 

JLne iSportsman s LAeea 



The Player . . . 



1. He lives clean and plays hard. He plays for the love of the game. 

2. He wins without boasting, he loses without excuses and he never quits. 

3. He respects officials and accepts their decisions without question. 

4. He never forgets that he represents his school. 

The Coach . . . 

1. He inspires in his boys a love for the game and the desire to win. 

2. He teaches them that it is better to lose fairly than to win unfairly. 

3. He leads players and spectators to respect officials by setting them a 
good example. 

4. He is the type man he wants his boys to be. 

The Official . . . 

1. He knows the rules. 

2. He is fair and firm in all decisions. He calls them as he sees them. 

3. He treats players and coaches courteously and demands the same 
treatment for himself. 

4. He knows the game is for the boys, and lets them have the spotlight. 

The Spectator . . . 

1. He never boos a player or official. 

2. He appreciates a good play, no matter who makes it. 

3. He knows the school gets the blame or the praise for his conduct. 

4. He recognizes the need for more sportsmen and fewer "sports." 

Official Organ of the 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

October, 1969 



K.H.S.A.A. Football Schools 



School 

Allen County 

Anderson County 

Atherton 

Ballard 

Bardstown 

Bath County 

Beechwood 

Belfry 

Bell County 

Bellevue 

Beiea Community 

Bishop David 

Boone County 

Bourbon County 

Bowling Green 

Boyd County 

Boyle County 



(Asterisks Indicate 8 man 

Address 

Scottsville 

Lawrenceburg 

Louisville 

Louisville 

Bardstown 

Owingsville 

Ft. Mitchell 

Belfry 

Pineville 

Bellevue 

Berea 

Louisville 

Florence 



Paris 

Bowling Green 
R. 2, Ashland 
Danville 



Breckinridge County Harned 



Bryan Station 

Burgin 

Butler 

Butler County 

Caldwell County 

Campbell County 

Campbellsville 

Carroll County 

Catlettsburg 

Caverna 

Central 

Christian County 

Corbin 

Covington Catholic 

Crittenden County 

Cumberland 



Lexington 

Burgin 

Louisville 

Morgantown 

Princeton 

Alexandria 

Campbellsville 

Carrollton 

Catlettsburg 

Horse Cave 

Louisville 

Hopkinsville 

Corbin 

Covington 

Marion 

Cumberland 



Cumberland County Burkesville 



Danville 

Daviess County 

Dayton 

De Sales 

Dixie Heights 

Doss 

duPont Manual 

Durrett 

Eastern 

Elizabethtown 

Elkhorn City 

Eminence 

Evarts 

Fair dale 

Fern Creek 

Flaget 

Fleming County 

Fleming Neon 

Fort Campbell 

Fort Knox 

Frankfort 

Franklin County 

Franklin-Simpson 

Fulton 

Fulton County 

Gamaliel* 

Garrard County 



Danville 

Owensboro 

Dayton 

Louisville 

Ft. Mitchell 

Louisville 

Louisville 

Louisville 

Middletown 

Elizabethtown 

Elkhorn City 

Eminence 

Evarts 

Fair dale 

Louisville 

Louisville 

Flemingsburg 

Fleming 

Fort Campbell 

Fort Knox 

Frankfort 

Frankfort 

Franklin 

Fulton 

Hickman 

Gamaliel 

Lancaster 



George Rogers Clark Winchester 



Georgetown 

Glasgow 

Greensburg 

Harlan 

Harrison County 

Harrodsburg 

Hazard 

Hazel Green 

Heath 

Henderson 

Henderson County 

Henry Clay 

Henry County 

Highlands 

Hiseville* 

Holmes 

Hopkinsville 

Iroquois 

James A. Cawood 

Jeffersontown 

Jenkins 

Jessamine County 

Jesse Stuart 

Johns Creek 

Whitley County 

Williamsburg 

Woodford County 



Georgetown 

Glasgow 

Greensburg 

Harlan 

Cynthiana 

Harrodsburg 

Hazard 

East Bernstadt 

W. Paducah 

Henderson 

Henderson 

Lexington 

New Castle 

Ft. Thomas 

Hiseville 

Covington 

Hopkinsville 

Louisville 

Harlan 

Jeffersontown 

Jenkins 

Nicholasville 

Valley Station 

R. 1, Pikeville 

Williamsburg 

Williamsburg 

Versailles 



Football Schools) 

Coach 

Bob Driver 
David Dutch Ishmael 
Jack Kleier 
Fred Reherman 
Garnis Martin 
Bill Baldridge 
Roger Walz 
Al Vipperman 
Tim Sowders 
Heulyn Bishop 
Wayne "Pete" Moore 
Denny Nash 
Jack Turner 
Eugene Correll 
Jody Ellis 
Tom Scott 
John Buchanan 
Stan Napper 
Dan Haley 
Jerry Schenz 
Elmer Collina 
John Miller 
Fred Clayton 
Bob Miller 
Carl Pike 
David Points 
Jerry Klaiber 
Sam Clark 
William Griffith 
Vic Waggoner 
Archie Powers 
Rudy Tassini 
Bill Dailey 
Ken Green 
Roy Petett 
Pat Dale 

Waymond Morris 
Ray King 
Rex Robinson 
Charles Fugitt 
John D. Pace 
Jim Vesel 
Bill Wyatt 
J. Richard Young 
Vince Hancock 
Jack R. Hall 
Woody J. Barwick 
Charlie Hunter 
Garland Miller 
Edgar Orick 
E. Sartini 
Ben Pumphrey 
Paul Stewart 
Marshall Patterson 
John Stephens 
Raymond Webb 
Sonny Adkins 
Ron Martin 
Larry Shanks 
Jack Haskins 
Billy Murphy 
Charles Harkleroad 
Lloyd Hodge 
Jan Anderson 
Bill Jones 
Coy Pigman 
Tommy Cawood 
Bill McKee 
Harold Wood 
Jack Carey 
Hughes Bennett 
John Bertran 
William K. Dawson 
Pascal Benson 
Robert Bell 
Harry Reif 
Mike Murphy 
Phil Higdon 
Bob White 
Fleming Thornton 
David Fry rear 
Wendell Wheeler 
James Hughes 
Thomas Brush 
Elmer Stephenson 
Kenneth J. Voorhis 
John A. O'Brien 
Donnie Rains 
Mickey Bowdon 
Ray Hager 



Ky. Military Inst. 
Ky. Sch. for Deaf 
Knox Central 
Lafayette 
LaRue County 
Lebanon 
Leslie County 
Lewis County 
Lily 
Lloyd 
London 
Lone Oak 
Louisa 

L'ville Country Day 
LVille Male 
Ludlow 
Lynch 
Lynn Camp 
Mc Kell 
Madison 
Madison Central 
Madisonville-N. Hop- 
Marion C. Moore 
Mayfield 
Maysville 
M. C- Napier 
Meade County 
Mercer County 
Metcalfe County 
Middlesboro 
Millersburg Mil. Inst. 
Montgomery County 
Morgan County 
Mt. Sterling 
Mt. Vernon 
Mullins 
Murray 

Nelson County 
Newport 

Newport Catholic 
Nicholas County 
North Hardin 
North Marshall 
Ohio County 
Oldham County 
Owen County 
Owensboro 
Owensboro Catholic 
Paducah Tilghman 
Paintsville 
Paris 

Park City* 
Paul G. Blazer 
Pikeville 
Pineville 

Pleasure Ridge Park 
Prestonsburg 
Raceland 
Re id land 
Rowan County 
Russell 

Russell County 
Russellville 
St. Xavier 
Sayre 

Scott.County 
Seneca 
Shawnee 
Shelby County 
Shelbyville 
Shepherdsville 
Simon Kenton 
Somerset 
Southern 
Stanford 
Tates Creek 
Temple Hill* 
Thomas Jefferson 
Todd Central 
Tompkinsville 
Trigg County 
Trinity 

Union County 
Valley 
Virgie 
Waggener 
Warren Central 
Warren East 
Washington County 
Wayne County 
Western 
Westport 
Wheelwright 
Whitesburg 



Lyndon 

Danville 

Barbourville 

Lexington 

Hodgenville 

Lebanon 

Hyden 

Vanceburg 

Lily 

Erlanger 

London 

Paducah 

Louisa 

Louisville 

Louisville 

Ludlow 

Lynch 

Corbin 

South Shore 

Richmond 

Richmond 

Madisonville 

Louisville 

Mayfield 

Maysville 

Hazard 

Brandenburg 

Harrodsburg 

Edmonton 

Middlesboro 

Millersburg 

Mt. Sterling 

West Liberty 

Mt. Sterling 

Mt. Vernon 

R. 1, Pikeville 

Murray 

Bardstown 

Newport 

Newport 

Carlisle 

Radcliff 

Calvert City 

Hartford 

LaGrange 

Owenton 

Owensboro 

Owensboro 

Paducah 

Paintsville 

Paris 

Park City 

Ashland 

Pikeville 

Pineville 

Pleasure Ridge Park 

Prestonsburg 

Raceland 

R. 8, Paducah 

Morehead 

Russell 

Russell Springs 

Russellville 

Louisville 

Lexington 

Goergetown 

Louisville 

Louisville 

Shelbyville 

Shelbyville 

Shepherdsville 

Independence 

Somerset 

Louisville 

Stanford 

Lexington 

R. 4, Glasgow 

Louisville 

Elkton 

Tompkinsville 

Cadiz 

Louisville 

Morganfield 

Valley Station 

Virgie 

Louisville 

Bowling Green 

Bowling Green 

Springfield 

Monticello 

Louisville 

Louisville 

Wheelwright 

Whitesburg 



Larry Williamson 
James D. Morrison 
Charles D. Black 
Virgil Chambers 
Ollie Howard 
Tommy Simpson 
Floyd Hines 
Nick Diachenko 
Roy Cochran 
Roy Lucas 
Dan Beasley 
Charles Acres 
Luke Varney, Jr. 
Kent McCubbin 
Vince Semary 
Steve Kiefer 
Ed Miracle 
Robert Igo 
C. A. Noble 
Melvin Chandler 
Tom Sims 
Dennis Sexton 
John W. McGuire 
Jack Morris 
Tom Becherer 
Charles Hall 
Wilson Sears 
Amos Black 
Harold Chambers 
Tommy Stapleton 
Mitchell Ghent 
Clayton Taylor 
Ron McGuire 
Charles Ishmael 
Lawrence Travis 
Paul D. Dotson 
Preston Holland 
Joe J aggers 
Al Neville 
Bob Schneider 
Jack G. Massie 
Willard Rice 
Dave Holt 
Richard Berry Jr. 
Paul Finnseth 
Ron Reed 
Gerald Poynter 
Terry Clark 
Ralph Colby 
Walter Brugh 
Homer Coins 
Elbridge Oliphant 
Herb Conley 
Ed VanHoose 
William E. Adams 
Vernon Wilson 
George McClellan 
Mike Holtzapfel 
Bernie Benrendt 
Paul Owsley 
Lafayette Walter 
Bill Wilmoth 
Clarence Baker 
Leon Dunagan 
Gerald Walton 
William Wilson 
Al Zampino 
David Peak 
Dan Gobel 
Richard Greenwell 
William H. Powell 
Jim Jenkins 
Jerry Johns 
Henderson Wilson 
William Leedy 
Roy Walton 
Jim Faulkner 
James A. Gray 
Mike Mace 
Frank Petett 
Ken Barrett 
James Kennedy 
Gary Steward 
Irvin Spencer 
James Clay 
John F. Stoll 
Jim Morton 
Roy Bondurant 
Burton Miracle 
Jackie Jewell 
Ralph Buckley 
Earl Browning 
Wilbur Jamerson 
James Gose 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXXII-No. 3 



OCTOB-ER, 1969 



$1.00 Per Year 



Hallmarks Of A Champion 

By James A. Gordon 

EDITOR'S NOTE; Those who have been closely asso- 
ciated with athletics, recognize that some persons bring to 
the field a number of the qualities which are needed for 
success in life. We acknowledge that these qualities can be 
developed through athletics by working hard at making the 
most of the opportunities. Some individuals possess these 
in greater quantities than they possess natural ability, but 
these qualities carry them on to success. 

The 1968 Olympic Games at Mexico City, despite the con- 
troversy, and occasional confusion, turned out to be a superla- 
tive spectacle which gave rise to a lot of little superlatives. 

Undoubtedly the greatest single performance, and certain- 
ly the most impressive athletic feat of the Games, to say 
nothing of the millenium, only took about six seconds. I 
refer, of course, to Bob Beaman's world record long jump 
of 29 feet 2Vi inches. 

But on the other hand, after watching Al Oreter throw 
the discus five feet further than ever before in his career 
to win his fourth straight gold medal, then later hearing 
Payton Jordan, Coach of the United State Olympic Track 
and Field Squad talk about him, my nomination for the 
most inspiring athlete of the Games has to go to the four 
time gold medal winner from Islip, New York! 

The qualities that make a "champion" have long been 
espoused and not much can be added to what already has 
been said, but 1 would like to pass on the four qualities thai 
his Olympic coach thought made Al Oreter great. 

The first was COMMITMENT. As Coach Jordan explains 
it, Al Oreter has a "special feeling" about the Olympic 
Games. 1968 was to be the "big one" for him. No other, 
championship meant so much. Of course, he was not the 
the favorite for this year's Games. After all, Jay Silvester 
had thrown 224 feet in pre-Olympic competition. But this 
made no difference to Al. He had always done his best in 
the Olympics and he was determined to win another gold 
medal at Mexico, regardless of the competition. 

Second was COACHABILITY. Oreter, according to his 
Olympic coach, reported ahead of time for final altitude 
training at Lake Tahoe. He was not throwing his best. 
"His timing was off," relates Jordan, "and he came to me 
and said, Coach, 1 need your help! Just think how this 
made me feel and what it did for me. Here was a three time 
Olympic champion, who believed he could improve, coming 
to me for advice. What an inspiration and satisfaction for a 
coach!" 

Next was TOUGHNESS THAT GOES WITH COMPETI- 
TION. It was not generally known that five days before the 
Olympic finals in the discus, Oreter slipped in practice and 
pulled a muscle. So he rested completely for two days, and 
on the third, with his leg wrapped came back out for prac- 
tice. Limiting himself to half effort on this day he threw 
the discus around 212 feet. This convinced him that he was 

(Continued on Page Five) 



Newly Elected Board Member 




Richard Vincent 



Richard Vincent, principal of the Union County 
High School, has been elected to membership on the 
K.H.S.A.A. Board of Control to fill out the unexpired 
term of Robert G. Fiser. in balloting which ended on 
September 10, Mr. Vincent defeated Prin. Neal R. 
Tucker of the Christian County High School. 

After participating in athletics at the Cuba High 
School, Richard Vincent graduated in 1954. He con- 
tinued his education and his participation in athletics 
at Union University, Jackson, Tennessee, where he 
received his B.S. degree in 1958. He was awarded the 
Outstanding Graduate Award from that institution. 
He has since continued his studies at Murray Univer- 
sity where he received his M.A. degree. 

Mr. Vincent's teaching and coaching career began 
in Calloway County at the Hazel High School. After 
school consolidation, he went to the faculty of 
Calloway County High School. After four years at 
that school he moved to Union County where he has 
served two years as a coach, three years as an 
elementary principal, and is now serving his third 
year as high school principal. 

Mr. Vincent married Miss Jimmye Ann Brantley of 
Sturgis. They have a daughter, Wray Ann, who is four 
years old. 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER 1969 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 40501 

Second class postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Ralph C. Dorsey (1966-70), Horse Cave 

Vice-President . . . Foster J. Sanders ( 1966-70), Louisville 
Directors-MortonCombs(1968-72),CarrCreek;W. H. Crow- 
dus (1968-71), Franklin; Don Davis (1967-71), Independ- 
ence; James T. Dotson (1968-72), Pikeville, Lee T. Mills 
(1969-73), Frankfort; Richard Vincent (1969-73), Morgan- 
field. 

Subscription Rate S1.00 per Year 

jttom the (commissioned s Cjffice 

EMPLOYMENT BUREAUS 

Sixteen employment bureaus for officials have been 
established. Each registered official should file at once with 
his nearest bureau head his schedule of games and list of 
dates on which the official will be available to call games. 
The names of the bureau heads, with the residence and 
business phone numbers (residence numbers given first), are 
as follows: 

Rex Alexander, 1320 Wells Blvd., Murray, 753-3579, 

762-6385 
Norman Hammons, Route No. 4, Hopkinsville, 886- 

7066, 886-3311 
Jerry Kimmel, Beechmont, 476-2656, 476-8375 
Bob Gour, 218 S. Lee, Bowling Green, 843-9582. 

842-0316 
Howard Gardner, 829 McCollum Elizabethtown, 765- 

6273 
Claude Ricketts, 1506 Larchmont, Louisville, 635- 

6536, 282-6615 (Jeffersonville) 
Hubert Louden, Box 75, Sulphur, 743-5297, 584-4141 

(Louisville) 
Roy Winchester, Bethlehem, 878-4102, 346-8761 
Bob Miller, 197 Holiday Lane, Ft. Thomas, 441-5885, 

635-2191 
Howard Rogers, 17 Maryland Avenue, Winchester, 

744-1785, 299-1221, Ext. 4152 (Lex.) 
Bobby Flynn, 428 McKenna Court, Lexington, 299- 

5902, 255-2481 
Bob Foster, Science Hill, 423-3313, 678-8161 
Billy Joe Golden, 436 E. Main Street, Lynch, 848-2512 
Goebel Ritter, 415 Cornelia Avenue, Whitesburg, 

633-7164, 633-4455 
E. B. May, Jr., P. O. Box 45, Prestonsburg, 886-3414, 

886-8661 
Ernie Chattin, Ashland Community College, Ashland, 

324-2665, 324-4900 



Certified Football Officials 



Bell, Clarence T. 
Blanton, Homer 
Bordy, Philip 
Boyles, Jerry F. 
Brotzge, Maurice 
Brown, Bill 
Brown, Herman 
Brown, John W. "Scoop" 
Bullock, Ted 
Burton, John 



Burke, Harry R. 
Canady, Ray Blair 
Cook, Richard N. 
Cowan, Robert L. 
Craft, Albert B. 
Culp, Willard E. 
Current, Ray 
Dallmann, James W. 
Davis, W. Curtis 
Denton, Charles 



Denton, William J. 
Durkin, Jack H. 
Elliott, Carroll L. 
Elovitz, Carl 
Faust, Jack 
Fish, Leland G. 
Flynn, Robert 
Fortney, Robert L. 
Foster, J. W. 
Fraley, Bill 
Frankel, Louis S. 
Fryrear, Bill P. 
Garrett, Richard A. 
Gentry, Dale J. 
Gour, Bob 
Grace, Charles K. 
Grace, H. E. 
Graham, James 
Hadden, Newell 
Hagan, Joseph E. 
Hedge, David Wm. 
Heinze, Frank 
Heinze, John G. 
Huber, Carl W. 
Johnson, Bernard 
Kaufman, Alvin R. 
Kraft, H. Nellis 
Lambert, Irvin 
Lange, William E., Jr. 
Leahy, Pat 
Lenahan, Thomas F. 
Lotz, Robert W. 
Lusby, George 
McGehee, Gordon 
McLemore, Jack 
McNabb, Edgar 
Mattingly, Charles Pete 
May, E. B., Jr. 
Mayhew, Wm. M. 
Mercke, Frank R. 
Mercker, George E. 
Metzger, Don 
Minta, John H. 
Moody, W. R. 
Mooneyhan, James H. 
Mordica, William A. 
Morse, Richard K. 



Murray, Thomas 
Neal, Gene 
Noland, Doug 
Nord, Bertrand J. 
Nord, Gilbert 
Norwood, Thomas R. 
Omer, Harold G. 
Osborne, Ted 
Parker, Bob L. 
Parsley, Clyde E. 
Peeno, Harry R. 
Raque, Ron 
Ray, Bob 
Reddington, Jim 
Reece, Fred "Rock" 
Reed, Gordon "Moe" 
Ring, Bill 
Russell, Gary E. 
Russman, Godfrey. F. 
Sapp, Edward 
Schmitt, Paul E. 
Schuble, Charles 
Scott, W. L. "Bill" 
Shanks, Thomas E. 
Shaw, John H. 
Showalter, John 
Sloan, Wallace 
Staten, Joe 
Stephenson, Harry 
Stevens, William D. 
Sullivan. Don C. 
Swinford, John 
Talbot, William G., 
Varner, Ray 
Vissman, Charles F 
Wagner, Jim 
Waide, Harry D. 
Walker, Paul R. 
Waller, Bobbie E. 
Wanachic, Nick 
Warren, Kenneth A 
Washer, Stanley 
Watts, Shirley R. 
Wilson, Louis 
Wise, Jack 
Wray, Robert F. 
Zi-nmer, Tom 



111 



Approved Football Officials 



Allison, Roy 
Anders, Raleigh 
Calitri, Don 
Collins, Ronald K. 
Crider, Ray 
Durbin, Roy V. 
Easley, Dan 
Feck, Richard A. 
Fenimore, Clarke E. 
Ferguson, Roy 
Frazer, Tom Roe 
Fuller, Wilton H. 
Gallahcr, Jack F. 
Gorham, Harry C. 
Hall, Charles E. 
Hancock, Norb 
Harsh, Ronald B. 
Horsman, Bill 
Ishmael, Stephen A. 



Jacoby, Ben 
Johnson, Harry A., Jr. 
Jones, Paul D. 
Kiser, Larry L. 
Kuhl, Lawrence 
Lillie, Wes 
Lowe, Gene T. 
McCoy, Larry 
McFadden, Jimmy 
Maloney, Pat R. H. 
Moore, James A. 
Morgan, Richard 
Oldham, Ben 
Osting, James E. 
Osting, Lawrence J. 
Pardue, Israel L. 
Pate, Lloyd W. 
Phipps, James M. 
Powers, Elmer 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER 1969 



Page Three 



Read, Frederick K. 
Reece, Jerry T. 
Renfro, James H. 
Rhodes, Cecil 
Sammons, Terry L. 
Schmidt, Henry R. 
Shaughnessy, Bernard E. 
Small, David E. 
Somerville, Robert J. 



Spath, William 
Taylor, James R. 
Thompson, Tom D. 
Timmering, George E. 
Turner, Charles 
Washer, James P. 
Webner, J. Randall 
Wilbert, Donald 
Wulfeck. James 



Cross Country Assignments 



Cross Country regulations adopted by the Board of 
Control provide that the state shall be divided into classes 
and regions by the Commissioner who will assign the 
schools to the regional sites. The 1969 assignments are as 
follows : 

Cross Country -Class AAA 

Paducah Region-Christian County, Crittenden County, 
Hopkinsville, Mayfield, Murray, North Marshall, Paducah 
Tilghman, St. Mary, Trigg County. 

Owensboro Region-Daviess County, Henderson County, 
Owensboro, Owensboro Catholic, Providence, Union County. 

Bowling Green Region-Adair County, Bowling Green, 
Glasgow. Greensburg, University. 

Clarkson Region-Breckinridge County, Clarkson, East 
Hardin. Elizabethtown, Fort Knox, Leitchfield, Meade County, 
North Hardin. St. Romuald, West Hardin. 

Bardstown Region-Bardstown, Campbellsville, Kentucky 
Military Institute, LaRue County, Louisville Country Day, 
Nelson County, Portland Christian. Shelby County, Taylor 
County. 

Lexington Region-Bourbon County, Bryan Station, Frank- 
fort. Harrison County, Henry Clay, Lafayette, Lexington 
Catholic, Lincoln School, Madison Central, Model, Tates 
Creek, Woodford County. 

Bellevue Region-Bishop Brossart, Boone County, Cov- 
ington Catholic, Dixie Heights, Grant County, Highlands, 
Holmes, Lloyd Memorial, Mason County, Newport Catholic, 
Pendleton, Simon-Kenton. 

Somerset Region-Danville, Eubank, Garrard County, Knox 
Central, Lee County, Monticello, Pulaski Counry, Somerset, 
Stanford, Wayne County. 

Paintsville Region-Bath County, Boyd County, Hazel 
Green Academy, Jenkins, Johns Creek, Johnson Central, 
Mullins, Oakdale Christian, Paul G. Blazer, Russell, Virgie. 
Cross Country-Class AAA 

Flaget Region-Ahrens, Butler, Central, duPont Manual, 
Flaget, Louisville Male, Shawnee. 

DeSales Region-Atherton, DeSales, Durrett, Marion C. 
Moore, St. Xavier, Southern, Thomas Jefferson. 

Iroquois Region-Bishop David, Doss, Fairdale, Iroquois, 
Jesse Stuart, Pleasure Ridge Park, Valley, Western. 

Waggener Region-Eastern, Fern Creek, Jeffersontown, 
Seneca, Trinity, Waggener, Westport. 

Football Rule Interpretation 



A rule interpretation authorized in 1969 requires clarifica- 
tion. The illustration on page 15, bottom diagram, of the 
1969 Simplified and Illustrated Book and plays 1 10 C, D and 
E of the current edition of the Case Book are concerned with 
the coverage to which reference is made. 

The Case Book situations of 110 C, D and E are hereby 
confirmed as correct. The caption for the diagram in the 
lower illustration on page 15 of the 1969 Football Rules - 
Simplified and Illustrated is incorrect. To be correct, it 
should read as follows: "There has been no score. The ball 
will be put in play at the inbounds spot on the yardline 
through the foremost point of the ball where it crossed the 
side line." The revision of the caption, as indicated, will 
correlate the coverage for the situations referred to here in 
both the Case Book and Simplified and Illustrated. 
-Cliff Fagan 



Schools' Ratings On 
Baseball Officials 

The following ratings were received on baseball officials 
registered with the K.H.S.A.A. during 1968-69. The numbers 
following each name represent respectively the numbers of 
Excellent, Good, Fair, and Poor ratings given to the official. 

Adams, William M., 5-8-0-0; Allen, Thomas E., 2-0-0-0; 
Allison, Larry J., 23-1-0-0; Anderson, Kenneth, 0-2-0-0; An- 
derson, Luther S., 1 6-2-0-0; Asher, Ralph, 2-16-1-0; Ashley, 
Kenneth, 2-0-0-0; Atchinson, Jim, 9-3-0-0; Atwell, Darryl R., 
0-1-0-0; 

Baker, Paul W., 0-6-0-0; Ball, Lindell R., 2-11-0-0; 
Barnes, Karl A., 0-6-4-1; Bertsch. Ronald L., 9-5-0-1; Biter, 
Charles D., 0-4-3-1; Blair, Kenneth, 0-3-0-0; Blevins, Boone, 
Jr., 0-3-0-0; Bosse, William, 0-2-1-0; Bottoms, Robert Bruce, 
Bouse, Robert M., 1-3-0-0; Branstetter, Charles F.., 2-9-1-0; 
Brantley, Kenneth Larry, 0-6-0-0; Brooks, Michael, 0-3-0-0; 
Brooks, Robert E., 4-1-0-0; Brown, Billy C, 4-4-0-0; Brown, 
John W., "Scoop", 6-3-0-0; Browne, Jerome F., 0-2-0-0; Bur- 
gess, Richard N., 1-11-0-0; Bushkar, John, 6-2-1-0; Butcher, 
Douglas, 8-1-0-0; Butner, Billy M., 8-3-0-0; 

Callahan, Gary, 14-8-0-0; Callis, Herbert, 5-1 1-0-0; Carl- 
berg, John H., 10-2-1-0; Carman, Coleman, Jr., 1-0-0-0; Cham- 
bers. Harold E., 9-3-0-0: Charles, James B., 0-0-1-0; Chum- 
bley, Ron, 1-0-0-0; Claypool, Thomas W., 3-6-0-0; Cline, 
Roy E., 10-9-0-0; Cobb, Charles E., 6-1-1-0; Colvin, Dorce 
A., 2-0-0-0; Cooper, Willie V., 3-0-0-0; Cornwell, James 
4-6-1-0; Cottrell, David, 6-2-0-0; Crager, Bobby F., 9-3-0-0; 
Craycroft, Harry S., 5-0-0-0; Crowe, Mike, 3-4-3-0; Culp. 
Willard E.. 1-4-0-0; 

Daniels. Robert A., 1 1-1-0-1 ; Daugherty, Roger. 9-1-0-0; 
Davenport, James E., 3-8-0-0; Davis, Bunny, 6-1-0-0, Davis, 
John F., 4-1-0-0; Dawson, Ray R., 2-0-0-0; Day, Charles 
R., 0-2-1-0; Delk, William L., 0-1-0-0; Denton, William, D., 
5-5-0-0; Dickinson, Ruddie L., 1-8-0-0; Downs. Charles 
6-0 0-1; Duerson, William Robert, 14-3-0-0, Duncan, James 
T., 2-6-1-0; Dunn, Chesley, Jr., 1-1-1-0; Durbin, Roy, 
0-7-0-1; Dwyer, James E., 1-5-0-0; 

Elliott, Carroll L., 16-2-0-0; Elmore, Jimmy A., 12-0-0-0; 
Emery, George, 0-1-0-1; Engle. William C. 2-5-0-0; Evitts 
Harold E., 0-1-0-0; Eyl, Edward W.. 12-2-0-0; 

Farrell, George A., 1-1-0-0; Farris, Reuben, 2-2-0-1 ; Felix 
Guy W., 0-2-0-0; Ferrell, Jimmy, 0-1-0-0; Fish, Leland Gil- 
bert, 3-3-1-2; llynn, Joseph L., 2-1-0-0; Ford, Eddie L., 
9-1-0-0; Frankel, Louis S., 1 2-0-0-1 ; Freeman, Joe T., 0-2-0-0; 
Furnish. Gary L., 0-1-0-0: 

Gardner, Gary, 2-6 1-0; Gibson, James D., 1-1-0-0; Gib- 
son, Junior L., 2-0-0-0; Gibson, Robert R., 0-0-1-2; Glass, 
Frank, 1-1-0-0; Goetz, Herbert, 8-3-1-0; Goff, Cecil, 6-0-0-0; 
Goodman, Bennie R., 5-3-0-0; Green, Freddie M., 0-1-0-0; 
Green, Leo F., 0-0-1-0; Greer, Raymond Wayne. 1-0-0-0; 
Griffith, Edwin, Dale, 3-1-0-0; Grimes, Herman L., 1-5-0-0; 

Hale, Richard F., 3-5-2-0; Hardin, Don G.. 19-0-0-0; 
Hardin, H. Stanley, 0-1-0-0; Hardin, William, 2-8-0-1; Harjo, 
Austin Amos, 0-1-0-0; Heaberlin, Bill, 1-0-0-0; Hendrix, Jack, 
22-0-1-2; Herbert, Jesse L., 9-0-0-0; Herdel, Christopher, 
4-2-0-0; Hildabrand, Gerald, 2-9-0-0; Hill, Clyde E., 2-1-0-0; 
Hill, James P., 3-1-1-0; Hina, Henry B., 7-3-0-0; Hinkley, Dale, 
7-1-0-0; Hinton, Henry, 0-2-0-0; Holbrook, Earl, 0-7-2-0; 
Hord, Ronnie D., 0-10-0: Hord, Tracy, 1-5-4-1; Horton, 
John L., 0-9-0-0; Houschell, Eddie L., 0-1-0-0; Hubbs, Cletus, 
0-3 0-0; Hudson, Miles F.. 0-1-0-0; Hurst, Terry, 3-0 0-0; Hurt, 
Thomas C, 7-2-0-0; 

Ingraham, Gary J., 1-0-0-0; Ireland, Jan L.. 0-0-1-2; 

Jacobs, Bob, 2-0-0-0; Jaggers, Larry D., 0-1-0-0: Jamer- 
son, Wilbur R., 2-0-0-0; Jenkins, Ronald E., 7-3-0-0; Johnson, 
Harry B., 4-7-0-0; Johnson, James M., 11-0-0-2; Johnson, 
Leroy, 1-6-0-0; Joiner, Bruce, 0-1-4-0; Jones, Frank, 9-2-0-0; 
Jones, Joe S., 13-8-0-0; Judy, Joe Lee, 2-1-0-0; Jump, Frank, 
0-1-0-0; 

Kasey, Michael M., 0-3-0-0; Kaufman, Alvin R., 3-4-0-0; 
Kays, Allie, 7-4 0-0; Kearns. Wayne, 1-0-0-0; Keeling. Reuben, 
0-1-0-0; Kelley, Richard, 1-0-0-0; King, James A., 18-0-0-0: 
Kinney, Charles L., 4-2 0; Kinney, Paul C, 1 1-6-0-0; Kirk, 
Charles Floyd, 0-1-0-0; Kochin, Steve L., 5-0-0-0; Kouns, 
Robert H., 3-1-0-0; Kuhl, Lawrence, 3-0-0-0; 

Lamb, Paul W., 5-5-2-0; Lambert, lrvin, 17-5-0-0; Lam- 
bert. John D., 2-4-0-0; Landers. John F., 0-4-0-0; Laskey, 
George, 1-2-1-0; Latham, Gene E., 4-0-0-0; Laugherty, 
Kenneth Ray. 0-0-2-0; Leigh, Eugene F., 3-0-0-1; Lewis 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER 1969 



Dennis, 0-2-0-0; Lindsey, Eugene, M., 4-5 0-0; Littlepage. 
Pryce. 3-0-0-0; Lovell, Monty Joe, 3-3-0-0; Loy, Harry. 
9-3-0-0; Lynch, Jack, 2-0-0-2; 

McBride, W. Kenneth, 0-5-1-0; .McDonald, Walter Dixon, 
2-4-0-0; Manasco, Norman, 13-3-0-1; Markham, James R., 
0-1-1-0; Marshall, Barry J., 0-2-0-0; Marston, Donn A., 
0-5-0-0; Martin. Charlie. 1-0-1-0; Martin, Roger K., 1-0-0-0; 

Mattingly, Charles "Pete", 11-0-0-0; Meredith, Thomas Louis. 
9-2-0-1; Metcalf, Ken, 6-7-0-0; Milburn, Martin Craig, 0-2-0-0; 
wilby, W.C., 2-9-0-0; Mills, J.F., 0-1-0-0; Mitchell, Jim, 
1-3-0-0; Mooneyhan. James H.. 2-0-0-0; Morgan, Richard, 24- 
3-1-0; Morgan, William Patrick, 1-0-0-0; Morgeson, Randall 
James, 0-2-0-0; Morris, Dean, 3-8-0-0; Morse. Richard K., 
5-0-0-0; Mulligan, J.T., 5-2-1-1; Murphy Charles, 7-1-0-1; 
Murphy. Darrell. 4-4-1-0; 

Nash, Lloyd R., 1-3-0-1; Nash, Richard, 2-3-0-1, Nash, 
Robert E.. 11-0-0; Neal, Alan, 1-13-0-0; Newman, Joe D.. 
0-1-0-0; Noland, Douglas, 6-0-0-0; Nolan, Michael Bruce, 
0-6-0-0: Norwood, Thomas R.. 16-3-1-0: 

Omer, Harold G.. 2-3-5-0: 

Pace, Donald, 1-1-1-0; Pack, James E., 0-1-0-0; Pack, 
James, Ronald, 5-0-0-2: Pardue, Israel L., 4-3-1-0; Payne, Bob, 
5-7-0-0; Pence, Jerry, 4-3-0-1; Penner, Merritt O., 1-0-2-0; 
Peters, W.A., 5-0-0-0; Peterson, John, 1-0-0-0; Phillips, 
Douglas. 1-0-0-0: Phillips. Thomas M., 1-0-0-0; Pietrowski. 
Paul, 3-0-0-0; Pollock, Robert, 3-3-4-0; Prather, David Wayne, 
9-1-0-?; Prather, Lee R., 8-0-0-1 ; Price, James E., 6-1-0-0; 



Prim 



James T.. 2-4-0-0 



Raines, J.W., 5-0-0-0; Ramey, Herb, 14-1-1-0; Rash, 
Lindell, L., 0-4-1-0; Ray, Collis Randle, 0-1-0-0; Reif, Harry F, 
9-0-1-0; Rhodes, Joseph D., 3-4-10; Richards. Ed., 1-1-0-0; 
Richardson, Charles T., 0-1-0-0; Ring, Bill, 1-2-0-0: Rison, 
Johnny B.. 8-2-0-0; Robbins, Michael, 2-6-0-0; Roberts, Carl 

S.. 3-1-0-0: koberts. Gerald V.. 0-3-0-0: Rodgers. Billy 
Gerald, 0-2-0-0; Rogers, Eldridge, 1-5-0-0: Roller. Otis C. 
0-2-0-0; Rowe, Steve, 20-10-0-0; Royce. Walter L., 5-3-2-0; 
Runyon, Tommy Dean, 1-0-0-0; 

Salsbury, Don, 1-9-0-0; Salyer, Henry t., 1-2-2-0; bara- 
mons, John I., 5-2-0-0; Sandusky, Jerry, 5-3-1-1: Saylors, 
Carlee, 6-2-0-0; Scott, W.L., 2-0-0-0; Sellier, Ed., 7-2-0-0; 
Sharp, Ronnie, 1-0-0-0; Shaw, Earl, 5-0-0-0; Shaw, James 
Kelly, 0-5-0-1; Sheperson, Cecil, 0-6-0-0; Sims, Wayne, 
0-1-0-0; Singleton, Jim 1-6-0-1 ; Sinkhorn, Richard D., 4-1-0-0; 
Skagg, Randall, 1-0-0-0; Smallwood, Talmadge, 0-0-1-0; Smith, 
Benny L., 8-3-1-0; Smith, Richard M., 9-5-0-0; Smith, Wayne, 
15-1-0-0; Smith Willard, N., 17-4-0-0, Smith, W. Jack, 2-5-0-0; 
Staker, Robert; 5-4-0-0; Stanley, O. A., 1-0-0-0; Staten, Gor- 
don Lee, 10-0-0-0; Stethen, James E., 2-1-0-0; Stone. Joe, 
0-1-0-0; Strain, Richard, 1 1-1-0-0; Strasburger, Charles, 5-2-0-0; 
Straub, Walter E., 0-0-1-0; Strickland, Herbert C, 0-2-0-0; 
Suhr. George, 8-4-0-0; Sullivan, Don Chris, 1-0-0-0; Sullivan, 



Howard, 0-11-0-2; Sullivan, William Howard, 0-13-0-0; Sum- 
ner, Carl H., 6-0-1-1; Swinford. James W.. 0-2-0-0: 

Tarry, W.R., 0-11-0-0; Tarter, Loyd, 0-1-0-0; Taul Geo- 
rge, 1-0-0-0; Taylor, Carl D., 1-4-0-0; Taylor, Ed., 0-2-0-0; 
Taylor, John, 0-0-1-0; Thomas Bill, 0-2-0-0; Thorton, Bryce 
C, 2-1-0-0; Thornton, Daniel A., 0-1-0-0; Tyre, Donald C, 
8-2-1-0; 

Upton, Leon, 2-2-0-0; Urlage, Richard, 4-0-0-0; 
Varble, William E., 0-1-0-0; Varner, Ray G., 2-1-0-0; 
Vincent, Johnny, 6-0-0-0; 

Waller, Bobbie E., 3-1-1-0; Washer, Jamie Don, 8-5-0-0; 
Watts, Frank Cooper, 0-1-0-0; Wesche, James A., 0-2-0-0; 
White. John Stanley, 1-0-0-0; White, Thomas Roger, 0-4-0-1 ; 
Wickham, James R., 3-4-0-0; Williams, Bobby, 19-2-0-0; 
Williams, Robert Hanson, 0-1-0-1; Williams, S. Jack, 2-2-0-0; 
Williamson. Junior. 0-1-3-0; Wilson, Lee, 0-3-0-0, Wilson, 
Philip M., 2-2-0-0; Winfrey, Shelby, 18-4-0-0; Wingfield, 
Felix G., 17-2-1-0; Wise, Dale, 3-0-0-0; Wiseman, Melvin, 
6-0-0-0; Wood, Thomas David, 0-14-0-0; Woosley, James R., 
0-1-0-0; Workman, Bill, 4-0-1-0; Wren, Bethel, 3-1-0-0; 
Wright, Jesse B., 0-5-0-0; Wright, John David, 0-1-1-0; Wyatt, 
William T., 1-1-8-1; Wylie, Wayne T., 1-5-0-0; 

Varbrough, Roy Dean, 0-1-0-0; 

Zirnheld, Leonard, 5-6-0-0; 



OFFICIALS' RATINGS ON 
SPORTSMANSHIP - BASEBALL 1969 

The following sportsmanship ratings were received on 
K.H.S.A.A. member schools from registered baseball officials 
for the 1969 season. The numbers following each name 
represent respectively the number of Excellent, Good, Fair 
and Poor ratings. Ratings of the coach, other school officials, 
crowd and team have been combined in this report. 

Adair County, 144-8-0-0:Adairville, 41-8-3-0; Ahrens 
Trade, 38-25-1-0; Allen County, 24-0-0-0; Anderson County, 
20-33-3-1; Atherton, 74-24-3-0, Auburn. 75-9-3-1; Austin 
Tracy, 30-10-1-0 

Ballard Memorial, 33-18-4-0; Barbourville, 63-18-0-0; 
Bardstown, 116-13-7-4; Bath County, 54-47-6-1; Beechwood. 
19-5-0-0; Belfry, 19-9-0-0; Bell County, 3-3-2-0; Bellevue, 
4-8-0-0; Benton, 44-3-0-0; Berea Community, 57-3-0-0; Betsy 
Layne, 10-6-0-0; Bishop Brossart, 11-11-0-0; Bishop David. 
85-30-1-0; Boone County, 70-9-1-0; Bourbon Countv. 33- 
17-2-0; Bowling Green. 101-1 1-1-3; Boyd County, 79-2 5-10-2; 
Boyle County, 101-6-1-0; Breckinridge County. 43-4-1-0: 

Bremen, 21-3-0-0; Bristow, 74-16-1-1; Bryan Station, 107- 
24-4-0; Burnside, 16-0-0-0; Bush, 75-12-1-0; Butler, 84-22-1-0; 
Butler County, 49-11-0-0 

Caldwell County, 55-4-1-0; Calloway County, 38-7-1-1; 
Campbell County, 10-10-0-0; Campbellsville, 109-7-0-0; Ca- 
neyville, 45-7-0-0; Carlisle County, 15-9-0-0, Carr Creek, 0-2- 
1-1; Carroll Countv. 29-1 1-0-0: Catlettsburg. 37-1 2-7-0; Casey 
County. 140-0-0-0; Caverna. 80-19-4-1; Central, 58-38-8-0; 
Central City, 37-6-1-0; Christian County, 101-14-1-0; Clark- 
son, 28-4-0-0; Clay County, 110-6-0-0; Clinton County, 35- 
2-0-0; Corbin, 38-5-1-0; Covington Catholic, 10-13-1-0; Cov- 
ington Latin, 0-3-0-0; Crab Orchard, 30-1-0-0; Crittenden 
County, 31-8-3-1: Cub Run, 1 6-4-0-0; Cumberland, 78-7-0-1 ; 
Cumberland County, 26-0-1-0; 

Danville, 77-10-1-3; Daviess County, 116-27-1-0; Daw- 
son Springs, 21-7-0-0; Dayton, 20-14-0-0; Deming, 12-0-0-0; 
DeSales, 21-47-7-16; Dixie Heights, 30-6-0-0; Dorton, 20-1- 
30s Doss, 44-1 1-0-1 ; Drakesboro, 41-11-0-0; DuPont Manual. 
60-37-2-0, Durrett, 91-29-0-0; 

Earlington, 52-9-1-4; East Hardin, 88-4-0-0; Eastern, 57- 
39-7-2; Edmonson County, 40-12-0-0; Elizabethtown, 139- 
8-0-1; Elizabethtown Catholic, 79-5-0-0; Elkhorn City. 52-3- 

0-0; Eminence, 8-6-0-1; Estill County, 66-2-0-0; Eubank, 15- 
5-0-0; Evarts, 28-9-1-2; Ezel, 7-13-0-0 

Fan-dale, 97-29-3-0; Fairview, 29-32-4-0; Farmington, 
13-3-0-0; Fern Creek, 51-12-2-0; Flaget, 33-41-5-3; Flaherty, 
48-3-1-0; Fleming County, 33-7-0-0; Fleming Neon, 9-2-1-0; 
Ft. Campbell, 53-3-0-0; Ft. Knox, 106-28-1-1; Frankfort, 
64-3-0-0; Franklin County, 119-11-3-0; Franklin Simpson, 
62-12-2-0; Fredonia, 15-17-0-0; Fulton, 4-0-0-0; Fulton 
County, 38-8-1-0 

Gallatin County, 4-8-0-0; Gamaliel, 17-1-1-0; Garrard 
County, 51-8-0-0: George Rogers Clark. 60-14-2-4; George- 
town, 77-11-2-0; Glasgow, 92-3-0-1; Graham, 19-5-0-0; 
Grant County, 43-18-0-0; Greensburg, 69-20-2-0; Greenup, 
128-8-0-0; Greenville, 92-20-3-0 

Hancock County, 3-1-0-0; Harlan, 30-6-0-0; Harrison 
County, 58-9-1-1; Harrodsburg, 59-5-0-0; Hart County, 41- 



9-2-0; Hart Memorial, 61-3-0-0; Hazard, 16-0-0-0; Hazel 
Green, 50-6-0-0; Heath, 19-11-3-0; Henderson, 70-4-0-0; 
Henderson County, 54-5-1-0; Henry Clay, 50-13-1-1; Henry 
County, 15-5-0-0; Hickman County, 8-4-0-0; Highlands, 16- 
11-0-0; Hindman, 3-0-1-0; Hiseville, 27-8-0-1; Hitchins, 60- 
0-0-0; Holmes, 43-23-1-9; Holy Cross, 34-4-1-1; Holy Family, 
52-10-1-0; Holy Name, 52-0-0-0; Hopkinsville, 65-15-4-0, 
Hughes Kirk, 29-3-0-0; Hustonville, 62-1-1-0 

Iroquois, 55-34-4-0; Irvine, 70-0-1-1 

Jackson County, 46-1-1-0; James A. Cawood, 29-7-0-0; 
Jeffersontown, 82-37-2-3; Jenkins, 17-2-0-1 ; Jessamine Coun- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER 1969 



Page Five 



ty, 115-9-2-0; Johns Creek, 62-17-5-0; Johnson Central, 33- 
18-5-0 

Kentucky Military Institute, 34-1 2-0-0; Kentucky School 
for the Deaf, 36-1-0-0; Knott County, 3-5-3-1 

Lafayette, 41-19-0-0; LaRue County, 124-0-0-0; Leb- 
anon, 77-5-6-0; Lee County, 43-1-0-0; Leitchfield, 37-4-4-0 
Leslie County, 8-0-0-0; Letcher, 21-3-0-0; Lewis County, 
22-6-0-0; Lewisburg, 67-14-3-0; Lexington Catholic, 73-13' 
0-1; Lily, 47-14-1-2; Livingston Central, 49-10-1-0; Lloyd, 
41-31-3-0; London, 72-9-3-0; Lone Jack, 30-7-0-0; Lone Oak, 
58-6-2-1; Louisa, 22-10-6-2; Louisville Country Day, 20-11- 
0-0; Louisville Male, 23-23-3-4; Lowes, 4-0-0-0; Ludlow, 51- 
9-2-0; Lynch, 37-15-4-0; Lyon County, 43-18-3-0 

McCrearv County, 19-5-0-0; McDowell, 16-13-2-5; Mc- 
Kell, 66-16-12-3; Mc Kinney, 27-5-0-0 

M.C. Napier, 2-2-0-0, Madison, 71-13-0-0; Madison 
Central, 75-1 1-0-0; Madisonville-North Hopkins, 104-18-3-6; 
Martin, 84-8-0-0; Mason County, 10-2-0-0; Mayrield, 48- Z6- 
5-0; Maysville, 10-14-0-0; Meade County, 28-5-1-0; Memorial, 
Menifee County, 32-7-5-0; Mercer County, 72-10-2-0; Met- 
calfe County, 67-1-0-0; Middlesboro, 36-16-0-4; Millard, 35- 
9-0-0; Millersburg Military Institute, 37-8-3-0; Model, 32-0- 
0-0; Montgomery County, 98-18-4-0; Monticello, 16-4-0-0; 
Morgan County, 38-31-2-0; Mt. Sterling, 49-22-5-2; Mt. Ver- 
non, 27-8-1-0; Mt. Washington, 11-0-0-0; Muhlenberg Cen- 
tral, 26-6-1-4; Mullins, 39-16-0-0; Murray, 84-10-4-1 

Newport, 5-1 3-2-0; Newport Catholic, 44-13-0-0; Nicho- 
las County, 93-9-2-0; North Hardin, 134-10-0-0; North Mar- 
shall, 63-6-1 -1; North Warren, 27-1-0-0 

Ohio County, 29-13-4-1; Old Kentucky Home, 48-5- 
0-0; Oldham County, 45-10-1-0; Olive Hill. 52-0-0-0; Olm- 
stead, 31-8-1-0; Oneida Institute, 55-17-0-0; Owen County, 
20-35-3-0; Owensboro, 141-57-1-1; Owensboro Catholic, 57- 
34-1-0; Owsley County, 26-6-0-0 

Paducah Tilgman, 82-27-8-0; Paintsville, 38-17-3-2; 
Paris, 52-9-2-0; Park City, 35-27-2-0; Paul G. Blazer, 102-18- 
6-2; Pendleton County, 41-1-0-0; Phelps, 15-1-0-0; Pike- 
ville. 36-35-5-0: Pine Knot, 4-4-0-0; Pleasure Ridge Park. 84- 
17-0-1; Powell County, 55-15-5-5; Prestonsburg, 50-7-7-0; 
Prichard, 25-7-0-0; Providence, 54-2-1-0; Pulaski County 
1 5-0-0-0 

Raceland, 66-25-5-0; Reidland, 29-6-1-0; Richardsville, 
3-1-0-0; Riverside Christian, 12-0-0-0; Rowan County, 116- 
21-4-0; Russell, 89-18-8-0; Russell County, 52-1-1-0; Russell- 
ville, 93-45-5-1 

Sacramento, 4-0-0-0; St. Augustine, 47-7-2-0; St. Char- 
les, 106-4-0-0; St. Henry, 29-9-0-0; St. Mary, 22-16-1-0; St 
Patrick, 4-0-0-0; St. Thomas, 0-4-0-0; St. Xavier, 58-30-8-3; 
Sayre, 67-17-0-0; Scott County, 56-4-0-0; Scottsville, 16-8- 
0-0; Seneca, 88-32-2-0; Shawnee, 39-36-2-2; Shelby County, 
27-7-1-0; Shelbyville, 83-16-3-0; Shepherdsville, 50-12-4-0; 
Silver Grove, 1 5-1 3-0-0; Simon Kenton, 31-8-2-1; Somerset, 
43-3-1-0; South Hopkins, 64-21-5-6; South Marshall, 21-5- 
5-1; Southern, 92-33-3-2; Stanford, 48-1 1-0-0 

Tates Creek, 77-33-0-0; Taylor County, 1 14-6-0-0; Tay- 
lorsville, 12-0-0-0; Temple Hill, 62-18-3-0; Thomas Jefferson, 
73-36-0-0; Todd Central, 88-3-3-2; Tollesboro, 0-4-0-0; Tom- 
pkinsville, 8-0-0-0; Trigg County, 54-3-0-0; Trimble County, 
7-1 3-2-2; Trinity (Louisville), 82-5 9-0-1; Trinity (Whitesville), 
25-14-2-0 

Union County, 40-0-0-0; University, 61-6-1-0; Univers- 
ity Breckinridge, 51-6-2-1 

Valley, 95-19-2-0; Virgie, 0-3-2-3 

Waggener, 44-28-0-0; Walton-Verona, 37-1 3-2-2; Warren 
Central. 89-1 1-4-0; Washington County, 37-1 5-4-0; Wayland, 
15-4-0-0; Wayne County, 7-4-0-0; Webster County, 54-2-1-0; 
West Hardin, 123-3-0-0; West Hopkins, 31-4-0-1; Western, 
60-45-8-0; Westport, 87-60-3-3; Wheelwright, 14-9-1-0; Whi- 
tesburg, 4-2-2-0; Whitley County, 30-8-2-0; Williamsburg, 
18-9-1-0; Williamstown, 12-0-0-0; Woodford County, 36-32- 
0-2;Wurtland, 2-6-0-0 



National Federation Bulletin 

THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE has directed the secre- 
tary to call to the membership's attention recent action of the 
United States Golf Association which will permit "any full- 
time faculty member of an educational institution to give 
some golf instruction as part of his duties without forfeiting 
amateur status." The amendment to the amateur role of the 
United States Golf Association was adopted early in July of 
this year. 

PREVIOUSLY, a teacher violated his amateur status 
with the United States Golf Association if, under any 
circumstances, he gave golf instruction as part of his duties. 
Under the old rule, a teacher of academic subjects was per- 
mitted to give golf instruction as part of his duties only if he 
were hired to teach academic subjects and golf instruction 
was not a condition of his employment. Such a teacher 
could not be engaged as coach of the golf team and com- 
pensated theiefore. 

THE NATIONAL FEDERATION in March, 1968 request- 
ed the United States Golf Association to review the USGA 
amateur regulation as it affected reimbursement to a full- 
time faculty member who also coached interscholastic golf 
as part of his assignment. The National Federation pointed 
out that the quality of coaching would be greatly improved 
if the rules were amended td allow faculty members of 
educational institutions to give golf instruction to students 
and be compensated for this particular service without 
affecting their amateur status. 

THE RULES OF AMATEUR STATUS (United States 
Golf Association) will include an exception to Rule 1-3 
which now prohibits an amateur from receiving compensa- 
tion for giving golf instruction. The exception will read as 
follows: 

"Golf instruction may be given to students at an educa- 
tional institution by a full-time faculty member, provided 
that the total time devoted to golf instruction comprises not 
more than 10 per cent of his annual teaching time. Camp 
counsellors who give golf instruction as part of their com- 
pensated duties are not amateur golfers." 

MANY STATE ASSOCIATIONS will want to call this 
change in the instruction rule to the attention of their 
membership. 

Hallmarks of a Champion 
(Continued from Page 1) 
ready to go. Two days later, in spite of the pulled muscle, 
he reported for competition. 

It rained for the finals of the discus at Mexico, and the 
competition dragged along. The finalists sheltered them- 
selves under umbrellas for a while, but eventually the 
officials sent them to the locker room to await recall when 
the showers subsided. During this wait the nerves were 
tight. Most of the throwers paced the locker room, pawing 
at the floor, cursing the elements and burning up nervous 
energy as they waited. But not Oreter. Stretched out on a 
locker room bench, Al wrapped a towel around his head, 
and with the coolness characteristic of a three time Olympic 
Champion, calmly waited until he was called back to the 
field. 

His first throw of 212 feet when competition resumed is 
now history. It was not his winning throw, but it might as 
well have been. After this, none of the other finalists came 
close Al fouled on the second of his final throws and on his 
third, tied the Olympic record with a winning mark of 212 
feet 6Vi inches. But it was his first from a slippery ring with 
a wet discus, after the long wait, that proved his tough 
competitive fiber. And it won him a fourth straight gold me- 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER 1969 



dal - a feat that will not soon be duplicated. 

And finally, what Payton Jordan admired most about the 
four time gold medal winner was his HUMILITY. "Gosh" 
he concludes, "I still am old fashioned enough to like an 
athlete who can say, Thank you! No matter how great he 
was, or how many medals he won. Al always showed his 
appreciation, and this too, make a coach feel good! 

COMMITMENT, COACHABILITY, TOUGHNESS, THAT 
GOES WITH COMPETITION and HUMILITY. The hall- 
marks of a champion. I like these qualities. I thank they 
have a lot of meaning for athlete and coach. But most of 
all, I like the kind of MAN they represent. 

Attention, Officials! 

For the first time officials are being registered in the 
sport of Wrestling. Registration is not yet a requirement 
for those who officiate in the sport, but such a requirement 
will probably be put into effect within the next year or two. 
K.H.S.A.A. registered officials living in the areas where 
Wrestling is being sponsored by the local high schools may 
wish to consider registration in this sport. Inquiries should 
be directed to the State Office of the Association. 



Registered Basketball 
Officials of the 
K.H.S.A.A.- 1969-1970 

If the telephone number is given for an official, it is the 
home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is the home phone. 

(List Compiled October 1) 
Abshire, Ronnie Eugene, Phyllis, 835-4473 
Adams, James C, RR 2, 103 Glen Cove, Nicholasville, 885- 

3471, 885-3625 
Adams, William M., Letcher, 633-7787 
Addington, David G., Route 3, Roman Meadows, Owensboro, 

683-3987 
Aker, David D., Box 217, Vanceburg, 796-2067 
Akers, Curtis Allen, 277 High Street, Pikeville, 432-1505 
Alexander, Howard, RR 2, Crittenden, 823-8251, 824-4325 
Alexander, Rex E., 1320 Wells Blvd, Murray, 753-3579, 

762-6285 
Allara, Bill, Mate wan, West Virginia 
Allen, James D., Martin, 285-3442, Pikeville, 437-6291 

Ext. 41 
Allen, James F., Box 1040, Harlan, 573-1595, 573-4510 
Allen, Nelson R., 113 Gesling Road, Russell, 836-5352, 

836-8915 
Allen, Yvon, RR 2, Box 442, Hazard, 436-3290, Dwarf, 

2254 
Allgood, Russell L., RR 3, Elizabethtown, 765-4921, 769- 

3311 
Allison, Larry J., Kennedy Hts., Carlisle, 289-2241 
Anders, Raleigh, Route 5, Box 328, London, 864-6217, 528- 

1837 
Anderson, Douglas Lynn, 9220 Omar Khayyam, Louisville, 

937-7590, 937-4867 
Anderson, George, 102 Third Street, Manchester, 598-2719, 

598-2778 
Anderson, Glenn S., Jr., Box 286, Prestonburg, 886-3929, 

886-3552 
Anderson, Henry M., Route 3, Owensboro, 785-4458 
Anderson, Luther S., Liberty Hts. Route 2, Carlisle, 289-2364, 

233-2000 
Archibald, Larry T., Bracken, Augusta, 756-2501 
Arflin, Tracy T., 7511 B Montpelier Street, Ft. Knox, 624- 

1797, 624-2956 
Asher, Ralph, Box 232, Olive Hill, 286-4537, 286-2081 
Asher, Tony, General Delivery, Clay, 683-6323, 683-1548 
Ayers, Terry E.,514 E. 8th. Street, Manchester, Ohio, 549- 

5535 

Bailey, Sgt. Major, Frank, HHC USAR Eur-7A, APO New 
York 



Bailey, Gaar J., 6205 Van Court, Fern Creek, 239-3759,637- 

4731 
Baker, Ralph. 862 5th. Street, Corbin, 528-4544 
Baldwin, Ron L., 2437 Madison, Covington, 581-4203 
Bankemper, Thomas, 317 E. 7th Street, Newport, 581-5047 
Barnes, Jim Carroll, RR 2, Milton, 268-5687 
Barker, Phillip Michael, P.O.Box 269, Olive Hill, 2 86-4402 
Barker, Walter D., Box 1411, Friendship, Ohio, 858-5064, 

353-0190 
Barlow, Douglas, Route 5, Paris, 987-4596, 987-4351 
Barnette, Jerry, Route 1, Box 455, Pikeville, 432-2328, 

639-2774 
Basham, James, 223 Elm Street, Cloverport, 788-3903 
Bashford, William 1701 Silver Lane, Lexington, 255-3612, Ext. 

3618 (Bus.) 
Bates, Bob, 1120 Meadow Lane, Portsmouth, Ohio, 354-2168, 

35 3-0037 
Baumgardner, David A., 409 Spencer Avenue, Barboursville, 

West Virginia 
Beam, Joseph F., Jr., 1st. Street, New Haven, 348-3585, 

348-3991 
Beck, Robert Earl, 7530 Merlyn Circle, Louisville, 368-1965 
Begley, Jack, 1502 Florence, Middletown, Ohio, 423-4279, 

425-3681 
Belcher, William J., Bex 78, Crofton, 424-5160 
Bell, Clarence T., 3812 Meadow Haven Road, Louisville 

239-0782, 582-5573 
Bell, Robert J., 1580 Alexandria Drive, Lexington, 278-5736, 

252-0118 
Bennett, Gene, Route 2, Wheelersburg, Ohio, 574-2941, 

456-4191 
Bentley, James, Box 89, Jenkins 
Benzinger, Joseph Jr., 3502 Behvmer Road, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

752-3932, 742-2193 
Bergman, Harry W., Jr., Box 591, South Shore, 932-4298, 

353-5859 
Bero, James J., Box 968, Williamson, West Virginia 
Bersaglia, Ron, Bulan, 436-4891 

Bertsch, Ronald L., 65Geiger,Bellevue, 581-5790, 731-2012 
Biddle, Robert Lane, 126 East 5th Street, Maysville, 564- 

4674, 564-3856 
Bingham, Bennie, P.O. Box 88, Worthington, 836-4208 
Birchfield, Daniel R., Rice Station, 723-4874, 233-2000, Ext. 

3685 
Biter, Charles D., 6602 Moorhaven Drive, Louisville, 239- 

3580, 452-4032 
Black, Willis L., 407 10th Street, Corbin, 528-3393, 528- 

9035 
Bleidt.JohnJ., 70 18 Culver Lane, Louisville, 968-20 3 7 
Blevins, Donald W., 1954 Natchez Trail, Lexington, 277-6824, 

252-3770 
Bley, Richard, 3139 Pershing Ct., Cincinnati, Ohio, 481-3612 
Bocook, Earl, 1 102 Beech Street, Kenova, West Virginia 
Boling. Danny L., Route 1, Reynolds Station, 276-3745, 

927-2161 
Bond, Howard I., Ill, 141 Grove Street, Russell, 836-5825 
Booker, Gilbert, RR 1, Smiths Grove, 563-2631, 563-2631 
Bowling, Avery, 715 East Main Street, Hazard, 436-4933, 436- 

4933 
Bowling, Donald E„ 503 Scott Avenue, Pikeville, 437-7243 
Boyd, Marcus F., 3130 Riggs Avenue, Erlanger. 341-0219 

581-5000 
Bradford, Robert L., 76 Southview, Ft. Thomas, 781-1217 

752-1600 
Bramble, James, 153 Manitoba Lane, Lexington, 277-9477, 

255-1461, Ext. 258 
Brammer. Wardlow, 36 Bryant Circle, Maysville, 564-6133 
Branham, Larry, Austin, 434-2867 
Branham, Mason Jr., Box 1, Grahn, 286-4363 
Branstetter, Charles Elwood, 115 Kathleen Avenue, 786- 

2032, 524-5211 
Brant, Bernard, 2309 Fairview, Madisonville, 821-8638, 

821-7156 
Brashear, Loy Ray, Route l.Glendale, 854-2921, 765-2181 
Brashears, Malcolm W., 211 Knollwood PI., Frankfort, 227- 

7932, 227-9023 
Brauch, Charles, J., 117 Westview Drive, Bardstown, 348- 

3218, 348-3991 
Breeden, Bill, Box 296, Mt. Washington, 538-4897, 564- 

3750 
Brennenstuhl, Jim, P.O. Box 269, Williamsburg, 549-3379 
Brewer, J. Kenneth, P.O. Box 123, Campton, 668-6556, 

668-6556 
Briscoe, Hubert, RR 3, Shelbyville, 633-4669, 633-2543 
Broaddus, William, Route 1, Box 32E, Bardstown, 348-9006, 

833-4374 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER 1969 



Page Seven 



Brock, Alben, Kettle Island, 337-3848 

Brock, John D., Box 221 B. Route 1, Pineville, 337-3368, 

337-3512 
Brock. John H., 228 Madison Avenue, Richmond, 623-4833, 

623-4959 
Brock, Johnnie G., Stoney Fork 337-3752 
Brock, Lavone, E, "Red", Stoney Fork, 337-3271 
Bromagen, Michael, D., Route 2, Owingsville, 674-2270 
Brooks, Michael, 115 Liberty Street, Hopkirrsville, 885-5192 
Browder, Homer Lee, Sr., 405 Fair Street, Henderson, 826- 

2123, 827-5671, Ext. 44 
Brown, Billy C, 366 Big Hill Avenue, Richmond, 623-7529, 

623-3541 
Brown, Bix H., 1013 Darley Drive, Lexington, 252-1900 
Brown, E.C., Liberty, 787-7275, 787-71 91 
Brown, J.W. "Scoop", 975 Waverly Drive, Lexington, 252- 

0954, 252-3212 
Brown, Lyman, D., 415 Fountain, Paducah 
Browning, Earl, 3512 Foxglove Lane, Louisville, 425-2937, 

425-2541 
Browning, John T., 1138 Mitchell Street, Catlettsburg, 739- 

6416, 928-9144 

Bugg, James M., Route 2, Box 421, Henderson, 533-6347 
Bunn, Harold, 2523'/2Collis Avenue, Huntington, West Virginia 
Burch, Bill, 2421 Adams, Ashland, 324-8397 
Burchett, Dwight, Box 406, Paintsville, 297-31 5 8,789-5 562 
Burd, Robert T., 403 Westwood Drive, Middletown, 245-4848, 

245-4848 
Burgess, JackyW., 108 Cole Court, Barbourville, 546-6647 
Burke, Harry R., 328 Arnold Avenue, Prestonsburg, 886- 

2796, 886-2385 
Burkhart, James G., P.O. Box 169, Loyall, 573-1437, 664- 

3444 
Bush, KarmanB., 3642 Windward, Way, Louisville, 458-5465 

267-7486 
Butcher, Granville, "Bo", Williamsport, 789-3619. 642-3441, 
Butcher, Douglas, Box 14, Meally, 789-5553 
Butcher, Stephen D., Box 439. College P.O., Pikeville, 437- 

4586 
Butler, Bob, 157 Whittier Drive, Owensboro, 684-7016, 

684-4226 
Butler, JackK., 2604 Fourth Street, Huntington, West Virginia 
Butner, Billy M., P.O. Box 616, Lancaster, 792-3503, 925-271 1 



Caldwell, James A., 162 Clover Ridge, Ft. Thomas, 441-1626, 

397-2723 
Calitri, Don L., Box 481 Union College, Barbourville, 546- 

3775, 546-4151, Ext. 133 
Callahan, Gary, 410 Skyline Park Drive, Hopkinsville, 886- 

5026 
Callahan, Thomas J., 4346 Ridgeview, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

471-0768, 721-4787 
Campbell, Eddie, Hazard, 436-6792 
Campbell, George H., Jr., 116 Winchester, Middlesboro, 248- 

5882, 248-5843 
Campbell, Joe Earl, 25 Ky., Gr. Tr. Park, Bowling Green, 

842-3851 
Campbell, William Jr., Route 2, Manchester, 598-3472 
Canaday, Glenn, 201 Lincoln, Vine Grove, 877-5387, 877- 

5537 
Canady, Ray B., Barbourville, 547-4765, 547-3801 
Carlberg, John H., 227 Main, Muldraugh, 942-2723, 942- 

2730 
Carlberg, Ralph C, 1501 Elm, West Point, 922-4456 
Carman, Morris Lee, Hardinsburg, 756-2831 
Carr, Billy W., Longview Drive, Franklin, 586-6355 
Carr, John Leonard, 607 Chinn St., Raceland, 836-8949, 

324-1111 
Carson, Mike 3705 Far Hills Avenue, Davton, Ohio, 299- 

4530, 299-3333 
Cash, Charles C, 616 Hemlock, Calvert City, 395-4709, 395- 

4165, Ext. 217 
Carrico, Tommy, 1305 Vine, Murray, 753-7737, 753-9061 
Carter, Jack T., Bulan, 436-6148 
Cassity, Gordon, Route 2, Box 136K, Catlettsburg, 739-6200, 

324-1111, Ext. 8462 
Cates, Billy Chester, 130 Jacobs Drive, Princeton, Evansville, 

Indiana, 4247741, Ext. 582 (Bus-) 
Cavil, Leonard, J., 510 Maple Street, Nicholasville, 885- 

4182 fBus.1 
Cavitt, Charles, Jr., 1504 Johnson Blvd., Murray, 753-8607 



Cawood, Tommy L., Ivy Hill, Harlan, 573-2396, 573-3711 
Cecil, Donnie, Route 1, Rineyville, 877-5877, 877-2151 
Chaffin, Dale, Route 1, Rockfield, 843-8673 
Chattin, Ernest P., 615 17th. Street, Ashland, 324-2665, 

324-4900 
Chestnut, Lowell, London, 864-4453 
Childers, Phillip, P.O. Box 17, Garner, 785-5652, 785- 

5133 
Cisco, Robert N., 4288 Oakland, Ft. Knox, 624-7586, 624- 

7724 
Clair, Charles, Cecil, Star Route 1, Jackson, 666-5 717,666-9 22 3 
Clardy, Barry D., Greenville, 338-3510, 338-3036 
Clark, David Lee, Southern Baptist Seminary, Box 86, Louis- 
ville, 778-7604 
Clark, Robert L., 303 Southern Drive, Clarksville, Tennessee, 

647-2196 
Clark, Tom, 430 Spalding Avenue, Lebanon, 692-2034, 

Springfield. 336-3734 
Clater, James F.. 606 Broadway, Elizabethtown, 769-1617, 

895-2431 
Cleavenger, Ed., Route 1, Box 8, Morganfield, 389-2684, 

389-2419, Ext. 562 
Clements, John, Ro 
Clements, John, Route 3, Morganfield, 389-2684, 389-2568 

Clemmons, Samuel P., 635 Central, Lexington, 255-7566, 

252-0391 
Clemons, Glen O, 1012 Allison Lane, Jeffersonville, Indiana, 

282-7498, 636-3711 
Clevinger, Terry Wayne, Route 1, Box 180, Elkhorn City, 

754-8378 
Cochran, Harold, 317 Hood Ave., Lebanon, 692-4783 
Cochran, Ray Delano, Winn.. 297-3135 
Cochran, Roy H., Jr., 509 Master Street, Corbin, 528-1697, 

864-4330 
Coffey, Marion L., 2503 Savannah, Louisville, 425-0289, 

964-3271 

Cochran, Harold, 317 Hood Ave., Lebanon, 692-4783 
Coffey, Robert A., Jr., Route 4, Box 204, London, 864- 

6824, 864-4106 
Coffman, C. Morris, P.O. Box 200, Madisonville, 82 1-2600, 

821-5150 
Coldiron, Paul K., 9207 Earlham Drive, Louisville, 425-1451, 

361-2624 
Coleman, Daniel L., 641 Grand Avenue, Covington, 261- 

2388, 431-3207 
Coleman, James E., Phelps, 456-3591 
Colley, Lynn W.,411 E. 23 Street, Hopkinsville, 885-9538, 

886-4463 
Collier, Burnard, Sidney, 353-4111 
Collins, Hubert, Wittensville, 297-3152, 789-4890 
Collins, Larrv Lee, 2805 Taylor, Evansville, Indiana, 477- 

6994, 425-8279 
Collins, Mason, Route 3, Maysville, 759-7614 
Collins, Robert W., "Bob", 1727 Keenland Drive, Murray, 

753-3735, 762-3817 
Collins, Ronald K., 2590 Old Buttermilk, Villa Hills, 341- 

0578, 431-9964 
Collinsworth, Kenneth E., Campton, 668-6877 
Colvin, Jack E., 3605 N. Evans Avenue, Evansville, Indiana, 

423-1696, 425-2314 
Combs, Henry B., Star Route 5, Quicksand, 666-7103 
Combs, Keith A., 4519 Covert Avenue, Evansville, Indiana, 

477-2869, 476-3051 
Combs, Sherman, Box 355, Pikeville College, Pikeville, 
Compton, Ralph, Draffin, 754-8077 
Conley, C.B., 1237 8th Street, Paintsville, 789-5449 
Conley, Gary Dwight, Route 1, Box 310 Ashland, 928-6678, 

325-9343 
Conley, Martin T., 464 Hazen Street, Ludlow, 291-8570 
Cook, Jack W., 152 So. Edgemont Road, Huntington, West, 

Virginia 
Cooksey, Harold Dean, 6813 Bellrose, El Paso, Texas. 
Cooksey, Marvin O., 5905 Orville Drive, Louisville, 969- 

3585, 452-3346 
Cooper, John F., Augusta, 756-3176, 756-3001 
Cooper, NorrisE., 218 Dean Street, Bowling Green, 842-3619, 

842-8131 
Copley, Sidney, M., Box 13, Red Jacket, West Virginia 
Cornette, Ray, Gilley, 589-4407 
Cornette, Benjamin W., Route No. 1, Box 646, Pikeville, 

437-6394 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER 1969 



Cornwell, James, 506 South Main, Franklin, 586-4327, 

5 86-4451 
Cosby, Carel A., 558 Magie Avenue, Hamilton, Ohio, 895- 

7289, 423-4491 
Costigan, Jimmie, Route No. 1, Mt. Sterling, 498-2215, 

768-2145 
Cotton, Carl W., 515 Central Avenue, Wurtland, 836-6803, 

836-3166 
Cox, Alva J., 1818 S. Curry Pike. Bloomington, Indiana. 339- 

3084, 336-0214 
Cox, Colin, Route No. 2, Box 11, Hazard, 436-5963. 436- 

3711 
Cox, Kenny, 552 East High, Lexington, 269-2101, 255-5581 
Cox, Rufus, A., 624 N. Ky. Avenue, Madisonville, 821-2692. 

821-4850 
Coy, Charlie S., Boston 

Cravens, Richard F., 2713 Rodman, Louisville, 637-1906 
Cravens, Robert L., 3642 Taylor Blvd., Louisville, 366-8925, 

587-1391 
Crawford, Gordon, 2609 Kings Highway, Louisville, 451-5906, 

778-5531 
Creekmore, Burl Milford, Box 368, Pine Knot, 354-4082 
Creekmore, Les, 316 Walnut, Bellevue, 431-5259, 421-9964 
Croft, Lewis E., Box 42, Crofton, 424-5160, 424-5160 
Crouse, Joseph Louis, Jr., 315 Bellvue Street, Wilmore, 

858-3860 
Crowe, William Michael, Box 34, Stanton 
Cullum, Harold, 3743 Rhodes Avenue, New Boston, Ohio, 

456-5229, 456-4559 

Culp, Ronald D., 317 Walnut, Bellevue, 261-7834, 243-6663 
Culp, Willard E., 318 Skyline Park Drive, Hopkinsville, 

886-7967, 886-7557 

Cummins, Ray E., Box 428, Mt. Vernon, 256-4376, 256-2922 
Cundiff, Curt. Dry Creek Road, Clearfield, 784-4516 

Curnutte, Ivan M., 511 Columbia Road, Greensburg, 932- 

5047, 932-5231 
Curtis, Douglas E., 475 Florence Avenue, Fairborn, Ohio, 

879-1604 
Dalton, John P., Box 254, Morgantown, 526-4633 
Dame, L. J Route No. 2, Utica 684-5681, 683-2401, 

Ext. 238 
Damron. Charles E., Jr. ,215 CollegeStreet.Pikeville, 7-7918 
Daniel, Roger T., Box 15, Paintsville, 789-3372, Prestonburg, 

886-2311 
Daniels. Robert A., Box 2, Van Lear, 789-3931 
Daopoulos.JamesA., 163 E. Maxwell, Lexington, 254-4774 
Davenport, James E., 9.810 Dawson Hill Road, Jeffersontown, 

239-5667. 452-4413 
Davis, Arthur J.. 405-56-8201, "D" Brty, 5th, Bn. 1st. Artv, 

APO New York 09252 

Davis, Harold T., Box 191, Beaver Dam, 274-41 59, 232-4213 
Davis, Lonnie Joe, 503 Apperson Drive, Mt. Sterling, 498- 

3300, 498-2250 
Davis, Ralph C, 1326 S. 7th. Street, Ironton, Ohio, 532- 

8606, 532-8143 
Davis, Ralph E., 1007 Front Street, Vanceburg, 796-2002, 

796-3072 
Dawson, Alby L., 53622nd Street, Dunbar, West Virginia 
Dawso'i, Terry Thomas, Route No. 4, Cynthiana, 234-5316, 

234-4393 
Day, Bill E., 304 Esperanza, Frankfort, 277-75 34, 564-44 1 1 
Day, Jack L., Central City, 754-4700, 754-2272 
Dean.JerryW., McKee, 287-7301, 287-7161 
Decker, Dennis L.,930North Ft. Thomas Avenue. Ft. Thomas 
Delph, Joseph B., Box 957, Lynch, 848-2065 
Dennedy, Bob, 5083 Orangelawn Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

922-8352, 922-2300 
Denton, Charles, 127 Hubbard Lane, Henderson, 826-4020, 

826-9533 
Derrickson, Richard 621 Cardinal Lane, Lexington, 278-6350, 

252-2312, Ext. 2535 
DeVary, Bill, 3237 Raven Circle, Lexington, 277-7237, 233- 

2000, Ext. 3830 
Diachenko, Nick, Box 5, Vanceburg, 796-2823 (Bus.) 
Dickison.RuddieL., RR No. 5, Box 180. Olive Hill, 286-2194 
Dickson, Tom, 1134 Hogan Street, Portsmouth, Ohio, 

353-4488, 456-5547 
Dierolf. Col. William H., Jr., Forest Drive, Applewood Manor, 

R.D. 1, Dallas, Pa., 675-5633, 532-2349 
Dills, Bernie, 6516 Craigland Court, Cincinnati, Ohio, 231- 

4027, 421-5700, Ext. 591 
Disken, Jim, 2930 Vine Street, Cincinnati, Ohio, 281-0136, 

281-9264 
Divine, Wayne L., 626 Walnut Street, Central City. 754- 

2783, 754-2272 



Dixon. Billy M., Airport Gardens, Hazard. 436-460 5, 436-3423 
Dixon, Ron, RR No. 2, Box 380 A, Ashland, 928-9691, 

Huntington, W. Virginia, 523-0133 
Dobson, Kenneth, Route No. 4, Babbland Drive, Paducah, 

898-3756, 443-6285 
Donahue, Owen, 1807 Pheasant Hills Drive, Loveland, Ohio, 

683-2283, 821-3811, Ext. 320 
Dorsey, James A., 4062 Vinedale, Cincinnati, Ohio, 471-8050 
Dotson, John B., Ill Beech Street, Vincennes, Indiana, 

882-8095, 725-3855 
Downs, Joseph W., 829 Bartley. Bardstown, 348-5123, 

348-3991 
Drake, Richard R., 72 Donnelly Drive, Ft. Thomas, 441-423 5 
Driskell, Earl, Jr., 3311 Moulton Lane, Louisville, 459-7638, 

583-9711 
Driver, Bob, Route No. 1 .Scottsville, 237-4005, 237-3841 
Duckworth, Johnny, 1430 Fredonia, Owensboro, 685-2206 
Duerson, William Robert, Route No. 2, Paint Lick, 925- 

2357, 925-2711 
Duff, Birchell, Garrett, 358-4564, 258-9391 
Duff, Earl, 202 Leimaur, Richmond. 623-6845. 623-6845 
Duncan, Gilbert F., 311 Commander, Louisville. 458-5144 
Durbin, Roy V., 2911 Dale Ann Drive, Louisville, 452-1730, 

587-1121, Ext. 237 
Duvall, Thomas Jay, Sr., 4924 Cedar Brook Court, Louisville, 

964-1536. 964-1536 
Dyke, Orville Dean. Box 231, Crestwood, 241-4109,, 452-4106 

Eades, Norman W.. 1453 Thames Drive, Lexington, 269-2178, 

255-5661, Ext. 259 
Edgington, Fred, 3 1 2 9th Street, Manchester, Ohio, 549-5062 
Edwards, Ernest, S., Jr., 823 S. 39th Street, Louisville, 774- 

5496, 584-0201 
Edwards, Richard A., 41 1 Logan Street, Apt. 8, Madisonville, 

821-9034, 821-9086 
Elam. James D., 2044 Georgian Way, Lexington, 277-4912, 

254-8282 
Elliott, Billy A., 8708 Terrv Lane, Pleasure Ridge Park, 937- 

4343 
Elliott, Carroll I... 307 College, Elizabethtown, 765-4007, 

765-6118 
Elliott, Carlos N., 2409 Vinedale, Louisville, 459-3587, 

582-2621 
Ellis, Johnny, P.O. Box 331, Prestonsburg, 886-2751, 886- 

3080 
Elswick, Billy Jack, Box 153, Elkhorn City, 754-4251 
Embry, James 8310 Delido Road, Louisville, 964-5193, 

584-1341, Ext. 226 
Emery, George, A., 234 Clay Street, New Albany, Indiana, 

944-5257, 283-3511, Ext. 254 
Emery, H. Richard, 12607 No. 18 Orell Road, Valley Station, 

935-8776 
England, Paul D., Oak Street, Cloverport, 788-3976, 745-3556 
Engle, Orville, 128 Oak Street, Pineville, 337-2916 
Estes, Walter Robert, 2548 Citation Avenue, Owensboro, 

683-1808, 684-9813 
Everitt, Thomas E., 121 2'A Fontaine Road, Lexington, 266- 

0552 
Ewers, Michael, 710 Scott Avenue, Pikeville, 432-2 508 

Faris. Leon W., Ill, 422 Aylesford Ford Place, Lexington, 

252-4053, 233-2000, Ext. 3685 
Farley, Jimmy, W. Jefferson, Berea, 986-3929, 623-1310 
Farmer, Billie L., 203 So. 16th Street., Mayfield, 247-7189, 

247-1941 
Farris, Willard H., 303 N. 3rd. Street, Williamsburg, 549-0 809 
Faulk, Terry, Mortons Gap, 258-5497 
Featherstone, Jerry, P.O. Box 414, Mayfield, 247-7448, 

247-3553 
Feger, George, Hillview Drive, Aurora. Indiana. 926-1963, 

926-1234 
Feher, Al, Box 746, Lynch, 848-2547, 848-5431 
Feltner, Ralph Jr.. Box 574, Pikeville College, Pikeville, 

432-1826, 437-7621 
Ferguson, Roy, Route 3, Barbourville, 546-3 892, 546-4007 
Ferguson, Thomas L., 215 Oney Avenue, Huntington. West 

Virginia 
Ferris, Meade Boykin, Jr., 5705 Apache Road, Louisville, 

896-4848 
Fields, Mickey Joe, Buckhorn High School, Buckhorn, 

398-7458, 398-7176 
Fields, Rufus, Jr., 104'/i McFadden Lane, London, 864-4051, 

864-2207 
Fille, Michael, Box 205, Flemingsburg, 845-3198. 845-8888 
Finley, Albert R., 114 Millbrooke Drive. Hopkinsville, 886- 

4108, 885-8335 
Finlev. Ben, 1325 Porter Drive. Henderson, VA7-2436 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER 1969 



Page Nine 



Fish, LelandG.,8260ak Hill, Lexington, 255-7156, 252-2312 
Fiske, CharlesN., 105 North Winter, Midway, 846-2871 
Fitzgerald,OscarL.,Box 321, Burnside. 561-4881, 561-9495 
Fletcher, Curtis, Borderland, West Virginia 
Fletcher, John, 807 Barbourville Street, Corbin, 528-2291, 

528-3902 
Flowers, Randal B., Route 1, Box 356, Cecilia, 862-4275, 

769-1356 
Floyd, Louis Richard, Shelbyville, 747-8751, 747-8751 
Flynn, Bobby, 428 McKenna Court, Lexington, 299-5902, 

2 52-4464 
Flynn, Reynolds, 1414 Sleepy Hollow Road, Covington, 

581-9837, 431-1128 
Ford, Ronald Kenneth, 208 B Main Street, Falmouth, 654- 

375S, 654-3355 
Foster, Berryman, E., 927 Waverly Drive, Lexington, 2 55- 

7374, 252-2312 
Foster. Bob, Box 94, Science Hall, 423-3313. 678-8161 
Fox, David G., Route 1, Box 194-A, Beattyville, 464-8536, 

464-8536 
Fraley, Bill, 1604 Lee Drive, Henderson, 827-3232 
Fraley, Joe 1704 East Main, Greenup, 473-7075 
Francis, James F., Wheelwright, 938-2395, 938-2364 
Francis, William Lewis, 8909 Brandvwyne Drive, Fern Creek, 

239-0489, 585-5081, Ext. 22 
Frankel, Louis S., 3723 Stanton Blvd, Louisville, 454-6519, 

454-6519 
Frazer, Tom Roe, Route 1, Sturgis, 333-4412, 333-4672 
Freese, Ollie, 5518 Mapleridge, Cincinnati, Ohio. 561-5398, 

351-7010 
Freppon. Thomas E., 37 Towanda, Highland Heights, 7S1-0583 

421-1800, Ext. 676 
Frey, William R., 235 Ridgewav, Southgate, 441-1286 
Fugate, Don, Viper, 436-3837 
Fugate, Johnnie, Box 334, Hindman 
Fugate, Robert, Jr., 716 Washington Avenue, Jackson, 666- 

5202 
Fuller, John R., Jr.. 4835 Epperson Road, Paducah, 898-31 15, 

443-5626 
Fuller, C. Richard, 406 Wyandot Way, Mt. Sterling, 498-5218, 

498-2660 
Fultz, Andrew "Jack". Box 536, Olive Hill, 286-2303, 286- 

2481 
Gaither, Gene, Box 103, Beaver Dam 274-3885, 274-4905 
Gamblin, Jesse H., 205 Dake Street, Earlington, 383-5391, 

821-9040 
Gardner, Gary, Route 3, Magnolia, 528-2947, 528-2947 
Garmon, James R., Little Renox Rte., Burkesville, 864- 

4312, 864-4312 
Gaskin, Donald W.. 1248 Dunkirk Drive, Lexington, 255- 

4335, 252-2626 
Gentry, Bobby Gene, 3420 Candy Drive, Hopkinsville, 886- 

6219, 886-2515 
Gentry, Dale, J., 4945 Determine Lane, Louisville, 447-5981, 

585-5814 
Gettler, John F., 705 Providence, Lexington, 266-4801, 2 54- 

4017 
Gibbons, Mike, 2733 Carolyn, Ashland, 324-2056 
Gibson, Carl, Mouise, 495-2387 
Gibson, Fred, 695 Lightfoot Lane, Madisonvill >, 821-2635, 

821-7156 
Gibson, Lowell Douglas, Sassafras, 476-2924 
Gilbert, Cebert. Jr., Box 136, Stanton, 663-2298 
Gilbert, Gerald, L., 426 Allen Drive, Vine Grove, 877-5094, 

Fort Knox, 4-7719 
Gilispie, John, RR 1, Wilmore, 858-381; 
Gilman, Ronald R., Route 1, Box 183, Delbarton, West 

Virginia 
Giordano, Al., 107 Ratliff, Princeton, 365-5680, 365-5615 
Goatley, Greg, Box 54, Springfield, 336-3565, 336-3810 
Goebel, N. Glen, Box 23 5, Taylorsville, 477-85 52, 477-2 226, 
Goforth, Bob, Box 548, Loyall, 573-4666 
Goheen, Larry, 819 Franz Court, Ashland, 324-8203, Hunt 

ington, West Va., 522-0366 
Golden, Billy Joe, 436 East Main, Lynch, 848-2512 
Goldey, William H., 866 Lamont Lane, Henderson, 827 

3622, 826-3932 
Goodin, Shirley, Glenn, 414 2nd, Street, Pineville, 337 

3982, 337-2435 
Goodman, Jack, 514 Springdale. Road, Brandenburg, 422 

2072, 422-3363 
Goodman, Richard, P.O. Box 404, Pikeville, 437-4947 

437-9125 
Goley, Jim, 85 Allison Drive, Florence, 371-5277, 431-8335 
Gordon, Levi J., 108 Eminence Terr., Eminence, 845-5865 

Louisville, 776-1501 



Gour,Bob,218S. Lee, Bowling Green, 843-9582, 842-9431 
Gover. Luid, Box 124, Science Hill, 423-2274, 678-8183 
Grace, Charles K., Cypress Street, Pineville, 337-3331, 337- 

2348 
Graves, Kenneth J., Mt. Olivet, 724-2441. 724-2861 
Graves, Preston H., Marrowbone, 864-3604, 65 1-5919 
Gray, Danny, Route 4, Box 179, London, 864-5683 
Gray, Kenneth, 1836 Tyler Parkway, Louisville, 458-2411, 

451-4430 
Gray, Raymond, Box 87, Livermore, 278-2615 
Gray, Steven, H.. 481 1 Dover Road, Louisville, 447-31 53 
Green, Donald P., 832 Brand, Mayfield, 247-6038, 274-6038 
Greene, Therman R., USAMP, Sch GMD, APO, New York 

09281 
Griffin, Charles D., 233 Garr Avenue, Flemingsburg, 845- 

9921, 845-4411 
Griffith. Millard, 143 North Street, Southgate, 441- 5746 
Grigsby, Pete, Jr., McDowell, 377-2356, 377-6202 
Grunkemeyer, Michael, 3138 Willis Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

321-7619 
Gulley, Lurid, 624 Burbank Ct. Lexington, 277-7547. 255- 

3612, Ext. 48 
Gupton, Lawrence 105 Hillview, Greensburg, 932-5001, 

465-4101 
Haas, Tom V., 10 Rosa PL, Cold Spring, 441-9570, 635- 

2195 
Hackett, Wilbur, 1472 Olive Street, Louisville, 772-0493 

452-4109 
Haddix, John F., P.O. Box 368, Campton, 668-8631, 668- 

3827 
Hagan, Joe E., 3000 Sherbrooke Road, Lousiville,, 458-1325 
Halcomb, Ralph W., 227 Helm Street, Elizabethown, 765- 

5029, 765-2204 
Hall, Jack, R., Elkhorn City 
Hall, Michael A., Booneville Road, Beattyville, 764-8000 

Hall. Richard G., 540 Riverside Drive, Prestonsburg, 886- 

6112 
Hall, William W., 474 S. Highland Avenue, Prestonsburg, 

886-3415, 886-3548 
Ham, Ronald, 3008 Broadway, Evansville, Indiana, 422- 

3371 
Hamilton. Dallas A., Inez, 298-3959 
Hamilton, Mike D., Circle Drive, Box 773, South Shore, 

932-4673, 932-3757 
Hamilton, Walter F., 3404 Bryan Way, Louisville, 459- 

5432, 587-1121, Ext. 265 
Hamm, Gerald, 1616 Oliver, Bowling Green, 842-5396, 

842-5396 
Hamm, Harold D., Route 6, Frankfort, 227-9800, 227-9800 
Hammons, J. S., 107 Sycamore, Barbourville, 546-4720 
Hammons, Norman, Route 4, Hopkinsville. 886-7066. 886- 

3116 
Hancock, Norb, 3823 Mamaroneck, Louisville, 451-7368, 

451-7368 
Haney, Raymond, Milo, 298-3539, 298-2364 
Hannah, Frederick, Asbury College. Wilmore, 858-9987. 

858-9987 
Hardin, Don G., Box 88, Morehead. 784-7698 
Hardin, Jack H., 1 105 B. Street, Ceredo. West Virginia 
Harjo, Austin, A., 108 Airport Road, Clarksville, Tennessee. 

431-3781, 798-3781 
Harned, Delano D., Custer, 536-3591 
Harper, Randall H.. 11806 Dearing Woods Drive, Valley 

Station, 937-5319, 772-3661, Ext. 2220 
Harper, Robie. Beechmont. 476 8084, 476-841 1 
Harris, Richard H., Route 4, Nancy. 871-3221 
Harris. Billy, P.O. Box 97, Cleaton, 754-4410, 754-1630 
Harris, Larry Russell. Cain's Store, 871-3491 
Harris, Wayne, RR 2, Somerset, 679-2184. 678-8166 
Harrison, Danny, Box 182, Vanceburg, 796-2462, Maysville, 

564-3171 
Harrison, John L., Webster Ext., Cynthiana. 234-3333, 

234-5721 
Hartman, Robert E., 3647 Concerto Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

563-6645, 891-7133 
Harvey, Andrew T., 357 Greenwell, Cincinnati, Ohio, 251- 

5013, 541-5400, Ext. 28 
Hatfield, Cecil E., 1726 W. 5th Avenue, Williamson, West 

Virginia 
Hatfield. Dennis G.. 4553 Virginia Avenue. Covington. 

291-8542, 431-3207 
Hausfield, Walter 1'., 3080 Crestmoor Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

922-5154, 521-0800 
Hawkins, Donald H.. Route 1, Ekron, 828-3631, 828-2125 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER 1969 



Hayden, John O., "Jack", 1624 Stafford Avenue, Louisville. 

367-8662, 454-1511, Ext. 77 
Hayden, Samuel J., Fancv Farm, 623-8414, 623-8102 
Hayes, Charles David, Mousie, 947-2126 
Hayes, James V., 8207 Westray Lane, Louisville, 969-1920 
Hayes. Larry. 439 Clifton Avenue, Lexington 
Hazelwood, Howard P., 1211 Devonport Drive, Lexington 

252-5122, 254-8031 
Heath, Robert, Hardinsburg, 756-2387, 769-1678 
Hedge, Robert Allen, 1216 Lipps Lane, Louisville, 964-8677 
Heinichen, Carl, C, 1941 Schollenberger Avenue, Cincinnati, 

Ohio, 931-7997, 931-7997 
Heldman, Dr., John Jr., 140 Seneca Trail, Louisville, 363- 

2181, 636-4463 
Henderson, Austin, 2603 Villa Maria, Villa Hills 341-6129, 

431-090(1 
Henderson, Jesse Carter, Route 1, Butler, 472-6591, 472-6591 
Hendrick, Kenny, Route 7, Bowling Green, 843-3428 
Hensley, Larry O., Box 573 Lexington, 25 5-9346, 299- 

1221, Ext. 6102 
Henson, Tony C, Route 6, Mayfield. 658-31 26, 443-1 1 55 
Hess, Charles, R., 609 Beecher Street, Louisville, 367-1585, 

361-2661, Ext. 213 
Hewitt, R. T., "Buddy", 813 Sharpe Street, Murray, 753- 

5435, 762-4458 
Hicks, Dane, 406 Churchill Ct. Elizabethtown, 769-2437, 

862-3924 
Hicks, Floyd E„ Florence, 371-6279, 772-1400 
Hicks, Lloyd, 6253 Springmeyer Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

662-5103. 771-6350, Ext. 452 
Highbaugh, Ottis, Bonnieville, 531-1875, 531-1200 
Hill, Earl F., Route 6, Box 141, London, 864-2521, 864-2128 
Hill, Earl Foyster, 2353 Shandon Drive, Lexington, 254-8746, 

255-3301 
Hill, James 2812 Epworth Lane, Owensboro, 685-2888, 

684-0448 
Hina, Charles W., Route 1, Box 202, Sturgis, 333-4409, 821- 

4422 
Hina, Henry B., Route 1, Sturgis, 333-5933, 3J3-4008 
Hina, Roy D.. Sturgis, 333-2770, 333-4008 
Hinton, Henry E., 1210 Witawanga, Lyndon, 425-7627 
Hisle, Charlie, 21 Locust Drive, Winchester, 744-5754, 299- 

1221, Ext. 3233 
Hitt, Billy D., RR 2, Maysville, 759-7707, 564-9156 
Hoffmeier, Paul, 3468 Tangent, Cheviot, Ohio, 481-5573, 

742-2262 
Hofstetter, Joe, Box 1815, Williamson, West Virginia 
Hollan, R. W., Beattyville, 464-2566 

Hollar, Lanny W., 102 Thorne Hts., Eminence, 845-4831, 
845-7851 

Holloway, Samuel J., Box 202, Ferguson, 678-8633 
Holmes, Roe D., 2501 Penix, Ashland, 324-3065 
Holt, Larry Kent, Jamestown, 3^1-2983, Bowling Green, 

781-1347 
Holt, Robert E., 3303 Southgate Drive, Hopkinsville, 885- 

3405, 886-1207 
Holt, Terrell W., 645 Radcliffe Road, Lexington, 299-5812 
Holthouser, Ora Lee, 614 W. So. Heights, Louisville, 366- 

4724, 774-7628 
Holthouser, Terry W., 5322 Georgia Lane, Louisville, 764- 

2950, 239-3267 
Hook, B. B. 801 Minerva Place, Murray, 753-2387, 753- 

6255 
Hook, Don, Route 1, Cunningham, 642-2 891 
Holton, Ray, 9715 Shady Acres, Jeffersontown, 267-6643 
Hopper, Marion W., 406 Pennsylvania Avenue, Elizabethtown, 

769-1598, Muldraugh, 942-3510 
Horn, Bascom, Jr., 200 E. Maxwell Apt. 4, Lexington, 255- 

3517, 252-7060 
Hord, Ronnie D., Box 74, Campbellsville, 465-5871, 465-7771 
Hord, Tracy, Star Route, Lebanon, 692-361 2 
Horn, Everett, Jr., Inez, 298-3423, 298-3217 
Hornsby, Colin, 784 Federal Way, Russell, 836-9137, 324- 

111J 
Horsman, Bill, 2902 So. 5th Street, Louisville, 637-1201, 

964-3301 
Howard, Bruce, West Liberty, 743-3803, 743-3705 
Howard, Jasper B., 1205 Glouchester, Middlesboro, 248- 

3388. 337-3093 

Howell, Danny A., 2082, Cabell Drive, Bowling Green, 

842-3661, 842-5727 
Hubbs, Sonny, 260 Old Orchard Road, Paducah, 442-8978, 

443-5177 
Huber, Jerry, 2873 W. McMicken Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

681-0897, 431-5723 
Hudnall, William, 13 Woodmont Ct., Paris, 987-1641, 987- 

4700 

(Continued in November ATHLETE) 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED FOOTBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled October 1) 

If the telephone number is given for an official, it is the 
home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is the home phone. 
Anderson, Douglas Lynn, 9220 Omar Khayyam, Louisville, 

939-7590, 937-4867 
Asher, Ralph, Box 232, Olive Hill, 286-4537, 286-2081, 

Bash, Charles, 1 1 1 "D" Street, Ceredo, West Virginia 
Bourne, Pugh, Jr.. 46 Sweetbay Cove, Jackson, Tennessee, 

424-3312, 427-6606 
Bowling, James Earl, 7600 Yorktown Road, Louisville, 361- 

2786 
Bowman, Earl G., 689 Mt. Vernon Drive, Lexington, 266- 

8111, 277-7157 
Bradford. Robert L., 76 Southview, Ft. Thomas, 781-1217, 

752-1600 
Brewer, Clyde U., 415 E. Coy Circle, Clarksville, Tennessee, 

648-2386 
Brooks, Michael, 115 Liberty Street, Hopkinsville, 885-5192 

Callihan, Billy Joe, M. Route, Russell, 836-8020, 836-9222 
Campbell, William C, 7413 Paiute Road, Louisville, 366- 

9296, 366-9561, Ext. 388 
Cannon, James Drew, 3004 South Main, Cor bin, 52 8-4071, 528- 

5956 
Cecil, Roger, Box 410, Hazard, 436-2853. 436-2151 
Clark, Owen B., 137 Showalter Drive, Georgetown. 863- 

3719, 252-0051 
Coffman, E.S., Jr., 1418 Nottingham Road, Charleston, West 

Virginia 
Craig, Louis, Route 6, Box93, Ripley, Tennessee, 635-2176 
Crisp. Alben, 2813 West Virginia Street, Ashland, 325-3150 
Cummings, Robert Jr., 405 Parkway Drive, Franklin, 586- 

3100, 586-3293 
Current, Robert O., 225 Vanderbilt Drive, Lexington, 277- 

8338 
Daopoulos, James A., 163 E. Maxwell, Lexington, 254-4774 
Davis, SP/4 Arthur J., 505-56-8201, "D" Brty, 5th, Bn., 1st 

Arty, APO New York 09252 
Dawson, Jack, 1500 Walnut Street, Kenova, West Virginia 
Dixie, C. P., 727 E. Caldwell, Louisville, 583-5728, 366- 

9561, Ext. 501 
Duff, Thomas, Box 1 1, Fruitland, Tennessee, 784-3789, 352- 

2781 
Duncan, Gilbert F.. 3110 Commander Drive, Louisville, 458- 

5144 
Dunn, Chesley, Route 4, Hopkinsville, 886-4394 
Durkin, Ja-k H., 1613 Kensington Wav, Lexington, 254 

0146, . 5-0717 
Dyer, Royce Lee, Route 1, Hickman, 236-2288 
Everitt, Thomas E., 1212Vi Fontaine Road, Lexington, 266- 

0552 
Furlong, William E., 3320, Grandview Ave., Louisville, 895- 

4755, 582-5108 
Gibson, Kicha.d L., 105 4th, Cynthiana, 234-4251, 234-4632 
Gour, Bob, 218 S. Lee, Bowling Green, 843-9582, 842-9431 
Greene, Jack R., 2 104 Washington, Flatwoods, 836-9003 
Greene, Therman R., U.7 AMP Sch. GMD, APO New York 
Griggs, John, 3045 Dartmouth Drive, Lexington, 278-2442, 

252-4471 
Gupton, George, 1050 Leylon Road, Greensburg, 932-4253, 

932-4200 

Haney, Bill, 456 Baird Street, Milan, Tennessee, 686-1256, 

686-7481 
Hansel, John T., Jr., Box 127, Whitesburg, 633-5034 
Harmon, H. Clay, Jr., Jackson County High School, McKee, 

364-5980 
Harris, Russell B., 368 Boiling Spring, Lexington, 254-6525 
Hill, Earl. Route 6, Box 141, London, 864-2521, 864-2128 

Joiner, BrL...e, 1000 Centril Avenue, Hopkinsville, 886-1471 
J>nes, William L., 814 Mc ^ ullum, Elizabethtown, 765 6061 

Kaelin, Carl D., 323 Idlewylde, Louisville, 895-8604, 635- 

2605 
Karr, Don, 1503 Woodwind, Corbin, 528-6466 

Lally, James, 1210 Ross Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio, 471- 

3644, 421-5700, Ext. 626 
Lawson, F. Eug'-ne, 205 Rockwood Drive, Chesapeake, i hio. 

867-3883. 696-3200 
Lee, Charles J. , 315 Scott Avenue, Lexington 
Leightenheimer, David, 4363 Gims Road, Portsmouth, Ohio, 

353-A602, 353-6607 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER 1969 



Page Eleven 



Lewis, Jesse, Box 202, Proctorville, Ohio, 886-6890, 429 

1381, Ext. 258 
Lindon, Bob, 2208 Jasmine Drive, Lexington, 278-2439 
Logan, Doug, Box 684, Barbourville, 546-4883 

McConachie,B.E.,2816Coleen Ct., Louisville, 845-1537, 946- 

3301 
McDaniel, Alan C, 507 Brockton, Richmond, 623-3553 
McGuire, Jack, 6421 Six Mile Lane, Louisville, 459-4031. 

964-3376 
McLaughlin, Calvin, 10611 Dodge Lane, Valley Station, 

935-7908 
Mattingly, Wayne, 204 W. Elm, Clay, 664-2023 
May, Larry, 59 W. Second Avenue, Williamson, West Virginia 
Miller, Harold R., 205 Robin Road, Russell, 836-3855, 836- 

9422 
Moore, Larry, Highrail Tr. Park, Bowling Green, 842-6883 
Mulliken, David K., P.O. Box 2619, Pikeville, 437-7512, 432 

1486 
Nickell, Carl Duane, 2009 Broad Street, Paducah, 444-6095, 

543-7434, Metropolis, 111. 
Patterson, William C, 419 Henry Street, Greensburg, 932- 

4738, 932-4211 
Pendleton, Ed., 2112 Mimi Ct., Lexington, 299-2264, 277- 

6115, Ext. 394 
Perry, Alfred H., 2 Karyn Court, Barboursville, West Virginia 
Powell, Logan G., 228 Garrett Avenue, Lexington 
Roemele, Juett, P.O. Box 244, Russellville, 726-9443 
Rutherford, Floyd, P.O. Box 151, Belfry, 353-4248 
Sat urley, Randall, 2 1 7-8th, Henderson, 826-31 47, 826-9 393 
Schmitt, Nicholas G., 636 So. 40th., Louisville. 772-01 31 
Seale, Frank E., 1001 Tates Creek Road, Lexington 
Shaw, John H., 209 Terrace Drive, Mayfield, 247-1907 
Spencer, Edward H., 2107 Inwood Drive, Huntington, West 

Virginia 
Staley, Jerry, 1117 Inca Trail, Georgetown, 863-2775, 254- 

7862 
Swartz, Larry G., 1225 College Street, Bowling Green 
Taylor. Dennis H., 1406 Hughes, Murray, 753-4825, 753-5022 
Thomas, Frank M., 629'/ 2 So. 44th Street, Louisville, 

774-2624 
Thomas, Raymond E.,2 12 Akin Avenue, Franklin, 586-6297 
Trombley.J. Norman, 1 50 Penmoken Park, Lexington, 278-6296 
Tye, Josh, Box 380, Barbourville, 546-3745 
Vinciguerra, Philip, Pikeville College, Pikeville, 426-4532, 

432-3161, Ext. 210 
Waddell, Billie, 635 Church Street, Ludlow, 261-5168, 321- 

5220 
Wayne, JamesC. , 109 JudsonHall, Godfrey Avenue, Louisville, 

897-4177 
Wedge, Denny, 1314 Utah Drive, Bowling Green, 842- 

6732, 781-1067 
Welch, Robert J., Jr.. 1406 Beech Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

471-3408 
Wilson, Nellus R., 223 Iroquois Drive, Paducah, 554-1810. 
443-6515 



of this account. 



wins/ 
ATT. 1 



Respectfully submitted, 
William Sexton, Jr.-Auditor 



KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL COACHES ASSOCIATION 
SCHEDULE OF INCOME & EXPENSES FOR THE PERIOD 
FEBRUARY 24, 1 968 TO FEBRUARY 27,1 969 



RECEIPTS: 




Membership Dues 


$4,032.00 


Total Receipts 


$ 4,032.00 


Plus: Balance in Bank on February 24, 1968 


10,110.12 


TOTAL 


$14,142.12 


DISBURSEMENTS: 




Expenses Executive Meetings 


232.37 


Postage 


115.00 


Secretarial Help 


10.00 


Stationery & Envelopes 


6.82 


Delegate Expense KEA 


25.00 


Insurance - Bond for Treasurer 


31.25. 


Annual Filing Fee - Ky. State Treasurer 


2.00 


All-Star Expense 


25.00 


Flowers 


29.45 


Printing Cards 


14.50 


Telephone Expense 


6.30 


Joe Ohr - Collection Fees 


990.50 


Total Expenditures 


1.518.19 


BALANCE ON FEBRUARY 27, 1969 


$12,623.93 



balance on deposit in Union Bank & Trust Company, Irvine, 
Kentucky, on February 27, 1969, per Bank Statement 
$12,623.93 



Irvine, Kentucky 
April 4, 1969 



K.H.S.C.A. 

Irvine, Kentucky 
April 4, 1968 

Executive Committee 

Kentucky High School Coaches Association 

Louisville, Kentucky 

Gentlemen: 

At the request of Mr. Joe Ohr, your Secretary and 
Treasurer, I have made an examination of the records of 
your Association for the period February 24, 1968 to 
February 27, 1969. 

Classified and consolidated receipts and disbursements 
are shown on the attached schedule of income and ex- 
penses. AH receipts have been traced into the Bank account 
and all disbursements are accounted for by canceled checks. 

The balance of $12,623.93 has been verified as being 
on deposit in the Union Bank & Turst Company, Irvine, 
Kentucky, as of the close of business on February 27, 1969. 

All records examined are in excellent order. 

We believe the attached schedule properly reflects the 
transactions for the period covered and the present status 



Executive Committee 

East-West All Star Football & Basketball Games 
The Kentucky High School Coaches Association 
Louisville, Kentucky 

Gentlemen: 

I have made an annual examination of the records 
of the All Star account from information furnished me by Mr. 
Joe Ohr. The period covered in this report is from February 
29, 1968 to February 29, 1969. 

Consolidated and classified receipts and disbursements 
are shown in the attached schedule of receipts and dis- 
bursements. The bank balance of $19,710.78 has been 
verified as being on deposit in the First Security National 
Bank & Trust Company, Lexington, Kentucky. 

Net receipts of $11,696.25 have been verified as deposits 
into the bank and all disbursements have been substantiated 
by canceled checks. 

I have attached a separate schedule of Savings Accounts 
showing the financial institution and the balances in each 
account. This is self-explanatory and all balances have been 
verified by telephone conversation with the appropriate 
savings firm. 

We believe this letter and the attached schedule properly 
reflect the various transactions for the period involved. 

Respectfully submitted. 



William Sexton, Jr. -Auditor 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER 1969 



In Stock for 



Immediate Delivery fho S DOft Shop 



First-aid Supplies 

A.B.A. Cold Tablets 

Adhesive Tape 

Alcohol 

Am Caps 

Analgestic Liniment 

Ankle Brace 

Ankle Weights 

Ankle Wraps 

Aspirin 

Athletic Liniment 

Athletic Soap 

Ath-O-Gesic 

Atomic Balm 

Atomic Rub-Down 

Band Aid 

Batter's Rosin 

Bike Tape 

Black Magic 

Body Powder 

Butterfly Tablets 

Carbonate Stick 

Cotton 

Cotton Applicators 

Cramergesic 

Dextrotabs 

Dial-A-Tab 

Dry Smelling Salt 

Elastic Wraps 

Elbow Pads 

Felt 

Firm Grip 



First Aid Kits 

Foam Rubber 

Foot Ointment 

Foot Powder 

Foot Solution 

Fung-o-spray 

Gauze 

Glare Guard 

Instant Ice 

Iso-Quin 

J & J Cream 

J & J Tape 

Kleen Ball 

Knee Braces 

Knee Pads 

Tape 

Tape Remover 

Tongue Depressors 

Towels 

Training Kits 

Tuf-Skin 

Football Equipment 

Ankle Braces 
Ankle Weights 
Arm Pads 
Bleachers 

Blocking Dummies 
Center Bars 
Chain Sets 
Charging Sled 
Chin Straps 



Phone 502 65 1-5143 




106-1 10 North Race Street 
Glasgow, Kentucky 



Write for 1969-70 school catalogue 



EAST-WEST ALL STAR FOOTBALL & BASKETBALL 

GAMES OF THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL COACHES 

ASSOCIATION 

Schedule of Receipts and Disbursements for the period 
February 29, 1968 to February 2 9, 1969. 



Balance on deposit in First Security Nat- 
ional Bank & Trust Company, Lexington, 
Kentucky, per Bank Statement Feb- $19,710.78 

ruary 29, 1969. ~ 



Receipts from All-Star Games 

Change Advanced 

Savings Account No. 5041 -Interest 

Less cash expenses to University of 
Kentucky Athletic Department 

NET RECEIPTS: 

Plus: Balance February. 29, 1968 



$10,280.25 

1,200.00 

500.00 
$11,980.25 



RSEMENTS: 


$29,816.40 


Rooms & Meals for Players 


3,349.92 


Refunds 


7.40 


Lloyd Smith — Grant 


500.00 


Printing 


344.91 


Players Awards 


787.50 


Misc. Medical Expenses 


82.60 


Change Advanced 


1,200.00 


Travel Expenses 


877.65 


Coaches Salaries 


1,000.00 


Manager Salary 


800.00 


Kentucky Sales Tax 


447.43 


Pictures 


61.16 


Insurance 


243.80 


Manager's Expenses 


403.25 



EAST-WEST ALL STAR FOOTBALL & BASKETBALL 

GAMES 
Kentucky High School Coaches Association 



SCHEDULE OF SAVINGS ACCOUNTS 

Columbia Federal Savings & Loan Association 

Covington, Kentucky 

Account No. 9315 

Balance as of 4-3-69 $ 5,395.44 

Central Bank & Trust Company 

Lexington, Kentucky 

ALL-STARS Account - Certificate No. 5041 

Balance as of February 9, 1969 10,000.00 

Citizens Union Bank & Trust Company 

Lexington, Kentucky 

ALL-STAR Account 

Balance as of 12-31-68 5,505.07 

First Security National Bank & Trust Co. 

Lexington, Kentucky 

ALL-STARS Account No. 23588-7 

Balance as of 3-3 1 - 69 11,119.13 



Total Disbursements 



BALANCE ON FEBRUARY 29, 1969 



$19,710.78 



Total Investments $32,019.64 

1 hereby certify that the above balances have been 
verified by telephone with the above institutions as being 
on deposit as of this date. April 4, 1969. 

William Sexton, Jr., — Auditor 



In Choosing An Insurance 

Program, Service And 

Benefits Should Always 

Be Considered First. 

Our Customers Have Found 

That They Get Full Value 

For Their Premium Dollar. 

Do You? 



7U& Ki*ujde*t Qo*tupjOH4f, general agent 

W. E. KINGSLEY J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. CHARLES C. PRICE 

Life Department 

121-123 LAFAYETTE AVE 

P.O. BOX 7100 LEXINGTON, KY. 40502 PHONE 254-4095 



51 YEARS 
FOR ATHLETES 

In August, 1918, our founder, Bill Hunt, was asked to help secure some 
uniforms for a football team so they could tell the spectators from the 
players. 

For 5 1 years we at Hunt's have tried to serve the athletes by finding for 
them the best available equipment to serve their needs. 

Today we feature and can supply immediate delivery on merchandise for any 
athletic or physical education need from our warehouse. 

We have complete stock of the following items. 

Football Shoes sizes 1 to 14 

Basketball Shoes sizes 1 to 1 7 

Football Pants sizes 22 to 52 

Football Jerseys sizes 4 to 50 

Football Shoulder Pads sizes Little League to 50 

Basketball Jerseys sizes 10 to 50 

Basketball Pants sizes Little League to College 

Athletic Socks sizes 6 to 16 

Football Helmets sizes Boys Extra Small to 8 

Football— Rubber or Leather— Little League to Pro 
Basketballs— Indoor or Outdoor— Biddy to Pro 
Fair Play Scoreboards— Grade School to College 
First Aid for prevention or treatment 

We specialize in your problems. 

Next day delivery to any school in Kentucky. 

Call on our experience and service with your problems. 

In Mayfield, 247-1941 COLLECT. 

One of us can help you. 

C. A. BYRN, JR.-ROY BOYD-JIM MITCHELL-EDDIE THOMIS 

JENNY SIMPSON-ELIZABETH RULE-NANNIE LOU USREY 

SONDRA CISSEL-HENRY BOMAR 



HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO., Inc. 

CH 7-1941 — PHONES — CH 7-1942 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 









High School Athlete 



K.H.S.A.A. REGIONAL BASKETBALL REPRESENTATIVES 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Roy Winchester, Bethlehem; Bob Gour, Bowling Green; Bob Miller, 
Fort Thomas; Goebel Ritter, Whitesburg; Bobby Flynn, Lexington; E. B. May. Jr., Prestonsburg. 
Second Row: Bob Foster, Science Hill; Claude Ricketts, Louisville; Rex Alexander, Murray; Hubert 
Louden, Sulphur; Howard Gardner, Elizabethtown; Ernie Chattin, Ashland. Third Row: Joe Golden, 
Lynch; Norman Hammons, Hopkinsville; Assistant Commissioner Billy V. Wise, Lexington; Howard 
Rogers, Winchester; Jerry Kimmel, Beechmont. 



Official Organ of tbe 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 



November, 1969 



FILMS 



The films listed below are in the Film Library of the 
University of Kentucky College of Education. The code 
letters "e, j, s, c, a" refer to elementary, junior high, 
senior high, college and adult audiences who may enjoy the 
particular film listed. The rental prices shown do not apply 
to schools which use one of the special subscription service 
plans offered by the Bureau of Audio-Visual Material. 
Basketball 

BALL HANDLING IN BASKETBALL, j-s-c, 1 reel, $2.00 

Teaches fundamentals of basketball handling includ- 
ing stance, grip, control, adjustment, before shooting, catching 
the ball, and other points. Presents game shots, using special 
photographic techniques to illustrate principles. 
BASKETBALL BY RUPP. j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $3.00 

Animated play diagrams, slow motion photography, and 
action shot are combined in this new film prepared under 
the personal direction of Mr. Rupp especially for coaching 
use. Among the drills and plays covered in this film are: 
pivot man's slide into the basket; Play No. 6, the famous 
Kentucky basket maker; legal screening; penetration zone 
defense; and the Kentucky fast break. 

BASKETBALL FUNDAMENTALS - INDIVIDUAL TECH- 
NIQUES, j-s-c-a, IV, reels, $2.50 

Branch McCracken, Indiana University basketball coach, 
used his team to demonstrate the fundamentals of basketball. 
Slow motion photography is used to break the various court 
techniques down into easily grasped essentials. 
BASKETBALL KENTUCKY STYLE, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $3.00 

(in state), $5.00 (out of state) 

This is the revised edition of the film "basketball by 
Rupp" prepared under the personal direction of Mr. Rupp 
especially for coaching use. 
BASKETBALL STRATEGY FOR GIRLS, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, 

$2.00 

The basic strategy of offense play (fakes, rolls, cutting, 
screening, varying pace) and defense play (player to player, 
basic zone, shifting zone, triangle, and diagonal) is demon- 
atrated and explained in this film. 
BASKETBALL TECHNIQUES FOR GIRLS, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, 

$2.00 

Basic movement skills (running, starting, stopping, turning) 
passing (finger control, movement with the pass, leading the 
receiver, choice of the right pass), catching (side pass, high 
pass), shooting (finger control, aim extension, wrist flip, 
choice of the right shot), dribbling, faking, and pivoting axe 
demonstrated and explained in this film. 
CHAMPIONSHIP BASKETBALL - TEAM TECHNIQUES, 

j-s. 1 reel, $2.00 

Man-to-man defense is shown, with the means best used 
under varying conditions. 

COVINGTON CATHOLIC VS. EARLINGTON (1967 Bas- 
ketball Finals), e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, (30 min.), color, silent, 

$1.00 

Earlington High School team won the tournament by 
defeating the Covington Catholic Colonels 54-5 3, by scoring 
a Field goal in the last second of the final game. The winners 
eliminated Russell, Atherton, and Breathitt County to reach 
the finals. 
DEFENSIVE FOOTWORK IN BASKETBALL, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, 

$2.00 

Striding with an opponent, checking, maneuvering him 
out of position and other basic skills are illustrated, using 
special photography to demonstrate points. Rebounding, 
pivoting, and correlated arm action are taught also. 
KNOW YOUR BASKETBALL, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, (33 min.), 

color, $1.00 

Provides a thorough examination of the rules and presents 
guidelines that will aid the fans as well as officials, coaches 
and players in a better understanding of those difficult 
judgment decisions that are constantly occurring on the 
basketball court. 
OFFICIAL BASKETBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels (40 min.), color, 

$1.00 

Demonstrates the official rules interpretations covering 
screening, traveling, jump ball, front and back court throw- 
ms, free throws, personal and technical fouls, rebounding, and 
unusual and often misunderstood play situations. 
OHIO COUNTY VS. CENTRAL (1969 Basketball Finals), 

e-j-s-c-a, i'A reels (35 min.), color, silent, $1.00 

Central High School of Louisville won the State Champion- 



ship by defeating Ohio County, 101-72, in the final game. 
Central eliminated Richmond Madison, Hopkinsville, and 
Maytown to reach the championship game. (KHSAA) 
RUPP'S FUNDAMENTALS OF BASKETBALL, j-s-c-a, 1 

reel (1 1 mins.), silent, $1.25 

Coach Rupp's University of Kentucky Wildcats (1949- 
50) demonstrate ten different plays. 
RUPP'S PARADE TO THE NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP 

of 1958, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, $4,50 

This film presents the highlights of all the games, both 
regular season and tournament games, which led up to the 
U of K's Wildcats winning the NCAA basketball crown. 
SHOOTING IN BASKETBALL, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $2.00 

Concentrating on the set shot, this film pictures the 
action of the throw, stance, aim, trajectory, and fingertip 
control. Special attention is given total body coordination, 
especially inward rotation of the hand and arm making the 
throw. 
THIS IS BASKETBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels (33 min.), color, 

$1.00 

Interpretation of play situations goes beyond the letter 
of the rule and gives guidelines to better understanding of 
blocking, charging, baskets interference, goal tending, screen- 
ing, and play violations of the free throw, jump and boundary 
Unes. 

Golf 

BUILDING YOUR SWING-UNIT II, j-s-c-a, 3 reels (27 min.), 

color, $7.50 

Shows how the swing is developed. Stance, rhythm, move- 
ments of upper and lower body explained with unusual movie 
techniques. Students will identify themselves clearly with 
examples on the screen as they build controls into their 
natural swings. 
PITCHING, PITCH AND RUN AND SAND SHOTS-UNIT 

III, j-s-c-a, 1V4 reels (12 min.), color, $4.50 

Teaches fundamentals of pitching, pitch and run and 
explosion shots out of sand traps. Carefully demonstrates the 
important differences in arm and wrist action for approach 
shots. 
PUTTING-UNIT IV, j-s-c-a, 1 reel (10 min.), color, $4.00 

Demonstrates and teaches several approved techniques. 
Wrist and firm, wrist swings, tap and stroke methods of 
applying momentum to the ball and how to play uneven 
greens. 
SAVING STROKES WITH SAM SNEAD, s-c-a, 1 reel, $2.00 

Golf champion Sam Snead illustrates his grip, his stance, 
his swing on each of several types of golf situations. Slow 
motion and "freeze" shots help to clarify the instruction. 
Shots and driver, brassie, and various irons for difficult lies 
are illustrated and finally his putting technique is shown. 
WELCOME TO GOLF-UNIT I, j-s-c-a, IV, reels (13 min.) 

color, $4.50 

Motivates the student to want to play golf. Shows him 
how to learn and what is expected of him. Helps him 
understand the game, the golf course and the equipment. 

Gymnastics 

BEGINNING TUMBLING, j-s-c-a, 1 reel (11 min.), $2.00 

Presents the two basic progressions in tumbling- the 
inverted balance and roll progressions. Accompanying demon- 
strations of flips, rolls, and stands (singly and in combination) 
emphasize skillful execution. 
GYMNASTICS, PART 1, j-s-c-a, l'/i reels (17 min.), $3.00 

Introduces the basic principles of gymnastics and follows 
the routines developed by polished performers on the parallel 
bars, the rope climb, and the long horse. Attention is given 
to the rolls, handstands, and handsprings, twists, and 
somersaults that are basic to tumbling. (Hoefler) 
GYMNASTICS, PART II, j-s-c-a, IVi reels (17 min.), $3.00 

Introduces the gymnast to the fundamentals of free 
exercise routines. Stresses the importance of smooth action 
as well as strength, form, balance, and ability to develop the 
difficult routines. Demonstrates rings, side horse, and the 
high bar. (Hoefler) 
INTERMEDIATE TUMBLING' j-s-c-a, 1 reel (11 min.), $2.00 

Demonstrates twenty stunts in handspring, balance, and 
somersault progressions and safety precautions are given 
to prevent accidents or injuries while teaching technique and 
form. 
SIMPLE STUNTS, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel ( 1 1 min.), $2.00 

Provides instructions in the healthful group activities 
that require little or no equipment. Demonstrates simple 
stunts for strength and skill and emphasizes safety precau- 

" ons - (Continued on Page Eleven) 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL XXXII-No. 4 



NOVEMBER, 1969 



$1.00 Per Year 



Educational Objectives 

By Clifford B. Fagan 
National Federation Executive Secretary 

FORTUNATELY, THERE IS INCREASED AWARENESS 
throughout the land that participation in interscholastic 
athletics can make a unique contribution to the education 
of the student-athlete. Boards of education and administra- 
tors recognize the great potential athletics have when the 
leadership on the field gives proper attention to educational 
objectives. The interscholastic program provides a laboratory 
course for educating, for contributing to physical fitness and 
for recreational opportunities. Schools have the responsi- 
bility of making these experiences available. 

OBJECTIVES MUST BE DEFINITELY in the mind of 
the coach while the program is being planned and while it is 
being conducted if the goals are to be accomplished. Unless 
the objectives are clearly established, they will not be 
reached. 

IT IS SELF-EVIDENT that the one objective definitely 
established by coaches and understood by the squad members 
is that of winning the conference title, of having an undefeat- 
ed season or, in any event, having a favorable won and lost 
record. Coaches are consistent in making certain there is no 
doubt about this objective. Obviously, in competitive athletics 
such an objective is desirable. However, it must be only one 
of the objectives and not the major one at that. Winning 
must not in any way overshadow or prevent achieving those 
educational outcomes which contribute to the growth and 
welfare of the participant. This is to say that there are more 
important objectives than winning and that the athletic 
coach must plan and conduct his athletic program according- 
ly. Fortunately, there is absolutely no evidence that a team 
cannot win and at the same time attain the other objective. 

THE COACH, IN PLANNING HIS PROGRAM, must 
provide opportunities to demonstrate to the participant that 
it is important for him to be prompt, that there is benefit 
from keeping regular hours and having good habits, and that 
abstinence contributes to efficiency. The student-athlete 
must recognize the value of a good diet, and that the control 
of temper contributes to cooperation and clear thinking. 
Programs with the correct emphasis will enable the partici- 
pants to realize that discipline contributes to efficiency and 
that you cannot be efficient without a leader directing. Boys 
who are members of football teams under wholesome leader- 
ship realize, as a result of actual experience, that the indi- 
vidual must work for the welfare of the group, that it is neces- 
sary for them to accept misfortune with serenity, and that it 
is possible for a player to think quickly and decisively. There 
must be ample opportunities to learn these lessons even 
when the situation is not in control of the player's team. 
These objectives are all obtainable and, fortunately, can be 
reached and accomplished while enjoying the activity. This 
is to say that anyone who participates in interscholastic 
athletics should come to the realization that there is fun in 
good competition. 



THE COACH CAN BE SUCCESSFUL from an education- 
al standpoint only if he has the objectives firmly placed in 
mind at the beginning of the season. He must schedule and 
construct situations in which the lessons can be learned. He 
must be alert enough to recognize opportunities which will 
encourage the development of desirable character traits and 
habits. Unless the entire coaching staff is completely aware 
of the educational objectives and outcomes, teaching oppor- 
tunities are consistently ignored and passed by. Incidents 
which will teach a lesson and which can be utilized for worth- 
while purposes will not be utilized unless they are readily 
recognized. And they will not be recognized unless the 
members of the coaching staff are looking for them. 

BECAUSE THE OBJECTIVE OF WINNING overshadows 
all other objectives, it is the criterion used too often to 
evaluate the season. Success is falsely determined by the 
number of games won or lost, or by the final place in the 
conference standings. This measurement, however satisfying 
or upsetting it may be, is not the true gauge of educational 
progress. The season has been successful only if the partici- 
pants have attained the educational goals. Unless the deter- 
mination of these objectives was made prior to the beginning 
of the season and worked for during the season, any progress 
is happenstance. 

TO INSURE EDUCATIONAL PROGRESS through parti- 
cipation in interscholastic athletics, it is necessary that the 
leadership establish and clearly understand educational objec- 
tives at the season's outset. Evaluation of attainment of these 
goals must be made at the end of the season. When there has 
been marked progress towards these goals, interscholastic 
athletics are accomplishing their purpose, and their programs 
are more than justified. These programs are making a contri- 
bution to the education of many boys who are difficult to 
reach through the classroom alone. 

The Rescheduled School Year 

On September 29-30, 1969, the Jefferson County Schools 
conducted a seminar on the extended school year. The Com- 
missioner was one of the panel members. The talk which he 
made is given below. 

"High School Athletics and 
the Rescheduled School Year" 

Since there is a possibility of an extended school year in 
Jefferson County at some time in the near future, it is quite 
natural for school administrators and their staff members to 
wonder about the effect that a major change such as this 
might have on extracurricular activities including athletics. 

A recent brochure prepared by the Department of 
Research, Jefferson County Schools, lists five plans and 
variations that fall under the extended school-year heading. 
These are the twelve-four, trimester, modified summer school, 
quadrimester and multiple trial plans. For the purpose of 
this discussion, I will assume that the four-quarter or quadri- 
mester plan is to be put into effect, and discuss possible 
modifications which would need to be made in the rules of 
(Continued on Page Four) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER 1969 



NOVEMBER, 1969 



VOL. XXXII-NO. 4 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 40501 

Second class postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky 

Editor THLO. A. SAN FORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Ralph C. Dorsey (1966-70), Horse Cave 

Vice-President ... Foster J. Sanders ( 1966-70), Louisville 
Directors-Morton Combs ( 1 968-7 2), Carr Creek ; W. H. Crow- 
dus (1968-71). Franklin; Don Davis (1967-71). Independ- 
ence; James T. Dotson (1968-72), Pikeville, Lee T. Mills 
(1969-73). Frankfort; Richard Vincent (1969-73). Morgan- 
field. Subscription Rate S 1.00 per Year 



~t>iom the Commissioned s CJffi 



ice 



REPORTS SOON DUE 

1. 1969 Football Participation List 

2. School's Report on Football Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Football) 



National Federation Basketball Test 

Part II of the National Federation basketball examination 
will be given all over Kentucky on Monday, December 1, to 
officials who wish to work for the Approved and Certified 
ratings. The examination sites will be determined by the 
Commissioner. Officials registered with the K.H.S.A.A. for 
the first time this year and who have not been registered 
previously in any other state association, are not eligible 
to take the test. Those interested should advise the State 
Office immediately in order that necessary arrangements can 
be made with the school administrators who will supervise the 
taking of the exam. Officials living in Kentucky need not 
suggest the name of the examiner. The Approved rating does 
not carry forward from year to year, but must be earned 
each year. 

Attention, Basketball Officials! 

At the School for Basketball Officials and later at the 
K.H.S.A.A. clinics suggestions were made concerning the 
advisability of pre-game conferences. Following are sugges- 
tions concerning these meetings: 

a. Check correct time, starting time of game, equipment, 
ball and uniforms. 

b. Review rule changes and special rule situations. 

c. Review court coverage, jump ball, out of bounds, 
switching, goal tending and basket interference, foul shot 
procedure, use of double whistle. 

d. Both officials should know the procedure when a 
foul occurs. 

e. Review lack of sufficient action procedure. 

f. Review coverage for pressing defense tactics. 

g. Review injured player procedure, 
h. Review timers responsibilities. 

i. Review pre-game and half-time duties of the referee 
and umpire. 

j. Discuss special situations relative to officiating team- 
work that will insure proper game coverage and control. 

Corrections— Baseball Ratings 

Officials- Bottoms, Robert Bruce, 0-2-1-0; Roller, Otis C, 
0-3-1-0; Wyatt, William T., 1-1-6-1. 
Schools-Meade County, 84-8-0-0. 



Minutes of Board Meeting 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association met at the K.H.S.A.A. Building, Lexing- 
ton, on Saturday morning, September 27, 1969. The meeting 
was called to order by President Ralph C. Dorsey at 11:00, 
with Morton Combs, W. H. Crowdus, Don Davis, James T. 
Dotson, Tom Mills, and Richard Vincent; Commissioner Theo. 
A. Sanford, and Assistant Commissioners J. B. Mansfield and 
Billy V. Wise present. The invocation was given by W. H. 
Crowdus. 

Don Davis moved, seconded by James T. Dotson, that 
the reading of the August 16th meeting be waived, since the 
members of the Board had received copies of these minutes. 
The motion was carried unanimously. 

President Dorsey announced the personnel of the swim- 
ming, wrestling and gymnastics committees. He asked that 
a listing of all 1969-70 committees be made a part of the 
Board minutes. These committees are as follows: 

Personnel and Policy -Chairman Morton Combs, James T 
Dotson, Richard Vincent. (The President and the Commis- 
sioner are ex-officio members of this committee.) 

Building-Chairman Don Davis, Tom Mills, J. B. Mansfield. 
(The President and the Commissioner are ex-officio members 
of this committee.) 

Trophy -Chairman J. B. Mansfield, Theo. A. Sanford, Billy 
V. Wise. (The President is an ex-officio member of this 
committee.) 

Retirement-Chairman Foster J. Sanders, W. H. Crowdus. 
(The President is an ex-officio member of this committee.) 

Swimming-Chairman Alfred M. Reece (Lexington), Mrs. 
Wilbur Bell (Cynthiana), Greg Bobrow (Louisville), E. W. 
Craik (Louisville), Don Davis (Independence), Miss Sheila 
Gilreath (Ashland), Rev. Richard Grenough (Louisville), 
Edgar McNabb (Ft. Mitchell), Jack Thompson (Louisville), 
Miss Dot Kirkpatrick (Richmond). 

Wrestling-Chairman Orville Williams (Louisville), Jerry 
Abney (Alexandria), Jerry Boyd (Danville), Will D. Evans 
(Louisville), Marshall Patterson (Ft. Campbell), Vince Semary 
(Louisville), Robert Weenolsen (Louisville), Bro. Joseph 
Wilhelm (Newport). 

Gymnastics-Chairman Bernard Johnson (Lexington), Mrs. 
Susan Burckle (Lexington), Dr. Barney Groves (Richmond), 
Andy Hopkins (Lexington), George Jefferson (Louisville), 
Mrs. Sheila Kuhlman (Louisville), James Nance (Lexington), 
Bob Wason (Louisville). 

The Commissioner reported the results of the recent 
balloting for Board membership in Section 1. The balloting 
was as follows: Richard Vincent, 31; Neal R. Tucker, 11. 
President Dorsey welcomed Richard Vincent to membership 
on the Board of Control, and Billy V. Wise to the administra- 
tive staff as Assistant Commissioner. Mr. Vincent and Mr. 
Wise responded with appropriate remarks. 

W. H. Crowdus, reporting for the Retirement Committee, 
presented a retirement contract between Billy V. Wise and 
the Kentucky High School Athletic Association represented 
by its duly constituted Board of Control. Mr. Crowdus 
stated that the contract was similar to the contracts of Messrs. 
Sanford and Mansfield. Richard Vincent moved, seconded 
by Tom Mills, that President Ralph C. Dorsey and Secretary 
Theo. A. Sanford be authorized to sign the Billy V. Wise re- 
tirement contract, representing the Board of Control. The 
motion was carried unanimously. 

Assistant Commissioner Mansfield reported that several 
Cross Country coaches and regional managers had suggested 
to him that the Board of Control consider requiring Cross 
Country competitors to wear shoes in regional and state 
events. Don Davis moved, seconded by W. H. Crowdus, that 
current Cross Country regulations be amended to provide 
that competitors in regional and state meets shall wear shoes, 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER 1969 



Page Three 



preferably track shoes. The motion was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner announced tentative dates and sites 
for the 1969 Football Playoff Finals as being November 21 
for Class AAA, to be played in Louisville; and November 28 
for Classes A and AA, to be played in Lexington. The Board 
gave its approval to these dates and sites. 

Assistant Commissioner Mansfield explained that it will 
be necessary to change the dates of the 1970 team and 
individual state golf tournaments at Fort Knox, as indicated 
on the activities calendar, since the two golf courses involved 
would not be available at that time. He suggested the dates 
of May 19-20 and May 26-27 for the team and individual state 
golf tournaments respectively, and these dates were approved 
by the Board. 

The Commissioner announced that an increase in the 
number of schools sponsoring Girls' Track would probably 
make it possible and necessary for an additional class in this 
sport to be created. 

The Commissioner stated that a few schools maintaining 
football had been unable to schedule the minimum number 
of four games within their districts. Since members of the 
Board had suggested at an earlier meeting that the out-of- 
district games mentioned in Football Rule II-B should be 
determined and the schools notified prior to the beginning 
of the season, the Commissioner had contacted President 
Dorsey and had been authorized to make the determination 
by lot for any school involved. W. H. Crodus moved, second- 
ed by James T. Dotson, that the action of the President 
and the Commissioner be approved. The motion was carried 
unanimously. 

Chairman Don Davis of the Building Committee reported 
that the architectural firm of Marye and Bond had been 
selected tentatively by the Committee to prepare plans and 
specifications for a new K.H.S.A.A. Building, if it appears 
feasible for such a building to be constructed; and that the 
Committee currently has several sites in mind which might be 
suitable and available for a new building. The Building 
Committee was authorized to negotiate for a building site, 
with Marye and Bond to prepare plans and specifications for 
a proposed new building, said site and plans subject to final 
approval by the Board of Control. 

The Board set the date of December 20, 1969, for its 
next meeting. 

James T. Dotson moved, seconded by Tom Mills, that all 
bills of the Association beginning August 1, 1969, and 
ending August 31, 1969, be allowed. The motion was carried 
unanimously. 

There being no further business, the meeting adjourned. 

New Film by A.M. A. 

A new motion picture showing the role of the team 
physician in the prevention and treatment of athletic 
injuries has been released by the Committee on the Medical 
Aspects of Sports of the American Medical Association. A 
print of the 28-minute color film, "The Team Physician," has 
been purchased by the K.H.S.A.A. and placed on loan with 
the Film Library, College of Education, University of 
Kentucky. 

The message of the film is aimed at physicians, coaches, 
school authorities, parents, and the athletes themselves. It 
includes five regulations laid down by the American Medical 
Association and the National Federation of State High 
School Athletic Associations— regulations which are "con- 
cerned with preventing injuries as well as treating them when 
they occur." 

The regulations include: proper training and conditioning; 
good equipment, including protective gear; good coaching; 
good officiating, with strict enforcement of the rules; a plan 
to assure proper health supervision by a qualified physician. 



The film illustrates each of the regulations with the help 
of a team physician, coach, trainer and high school football 
players. 

Bud Wilkinson appears as the narrator. Mr. Wilkinson, 
now on President Nixon's White House staff, was formerly 
head football coach at the University of Oklahoma and 
Consultant to the President on Physical Fitness as well as 
sports commentator on a weekly telecast during the football 
season. 

"The Team Physician" was produced for the American 
Medical Association by Calvin Productions. 



K.H.S.C.A. 



The annual meeting of the Kentucky High School 
Coaches Association met in Room 101 of the Convention 
Center in. Louisville on April 10, 1969. 

The meeting was called to order at 10:15 A.M. by Presi- 
dent Lawrence (Butch) Gilbert. Jack Goodman gave the 
invocation. 

By motion of Estill Branham, seconded by Bob Miller, 
the reading of the minutes was dispensed with as they had 
been published in The Athlete, official publication of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association. 

The financial reports having been published in The Athlete 
were dispensed with by motion of Ollie Leathers and 
seconded by Carl Deaton. 

Football Coach Jimmy Feix, Western Kentucky University, 
spoke to the more than 100 members present. He was pre- 
sented to the group by President "Butch" Gilbert. In a very 
informative talk Feix stated that in the future there would 
possibly be certification of coaches. He stated "by profession- 
al standards that 40% of those coaching are not prepared by 
professional courses." Feix also stated that coaches should 
teach winning and should not be ashamed to teach success. 

By motion of L. J. Charmoli, seconded by Bob Miller, it 
was proposed to change the expiration date of membership 
cards. The change from March 1 to April 1 passed. 

A lengthy discussion arose concerning the Hospitality 
Rooms at the State Basketball Tournament. It was suggested 
that Secretary Joe Ohr discuss this with Commissioner Theo- 
dore Sanford. 

L. J. Charmoli questioned the possibility of moving the 
All-Star game from area to area. 

Paul Young recommended that there be more meetings of 
the K.H.S.C.A. and it was proposed that there be a general 
meeting at the Ail-Star game site on Saturday afternoon 
prior to the playing of the games. Jim Guess, suggested 
that a committee be appointed to study the situation. 

Mike Murphy, Highlands High School, who was elected 
Football Coach of the Year 1968 by his fellow coaches was 
unable to attend the meeting and Bob Miller accepted the 
award for him. The presentation was made by Vice-President 
Vince Hancock. 

Robert Graves, Central High School, in Louisville was 
elected Coach of the Year in Basketball 1968. Graves guided 
the Central "Yellowjackets" to the State Championship 
of Kentucky. His award was presented by Coach Don 
Morris of East Hardin. 

Bill Case presented to Don Morris an award as the out- 
going president. 

Officers elected were: Joe Ohr, Irvine, elected Secretary 
and Treasurer, and Garnis Martin elected Sergeant-at-Arms. 

Meeting adjourned at 12:55. 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER 1969 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED FOOTBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled November 1) 

If the telephone number is given for an official listed, it 
is the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbersare given the first number is that of the home phone. 

Acree, Aaron, 1723 E 7th Street, Hopkinsville, 886-6818, 

886-3921 
Adams, Samuel A., Ill, 313 Mechanic Street, Hopkinsville, 

886-7044, 886-3921 
Barton, Leon, P. O. Box 797, Barbourville, 546-6368, 546- 

3661 
Baucum, Larry Wayne, 1 19 Clarkdale Court, Dawson Springs, 

797-2907, 886-3921 
Brame, Robert W., Route No. 5, Cadiz, 522-8033, 886-3921 
Bratcher, David L., 3652 Henry Avenue, Louisville, 368-5524, 

776-5748, Ext. 36 
Brummett, Don, 1967 Goldsmith Lane, Apt. G-10, Louisville, 

459-8938, 637-5401 
Butler, Elvis H., 212 Talbert Drive, Hopkinsville, 886-4697, 

886-3921 
Carr, Lawrence William, 323 Shelby Street, Covington, 261- 

2994, 243-3151 
Chiswell, Charles Lawrence, 1348 Royalty Court, Lexington, 

254-1564 
Dougherty, Michael L., 2621 S. Virginia, Hopkinsville, 886- 

7574, 286-3921 
Edwards, Richard A., 411 Logan Street, Apt. 8, Madisonville, 

821-9034, 821-9081 
Eubanks, William M., 416 N. High, Franklin, 586-3895 
Gover, Luid,P. O. Box 124, Science Hill, 423-2274, 678-8183 
Grace, H. E., Jr., Middlesboro, 248-1290, 337-3320 (Pineville) 
Hamby, Thomas, 201 Gateway Lane, Hopkinsville, 885-9980, 

888-3291 
Harper, Robert A., Route No. 4, Cadiz, 522-6546, 886-3921 
Harrison, Mark, Route No. 7, Box 279, Hopkinsville, 269- 

2216, 886-3921 
Henderson, Charles, 316 Andrew Drive, Hopkinsville, 885- 

5771, 886-3921 
Henderson, Donald, 3030 Chippewa Drive, Hopkinsville, 

886-3921 (Bus.) 
Holder, Larry, 619 Jefferson Street, Franklin, 586-4363, 843- 

3249 
Hopper, Fred W., 405 W. Brown, Nicholasville, 885-3847, 

258-9000, Ext. 2515 
Johns, Charles, Route No. 3, Fulton, 479-1819, 479-1819 
Jones, Dexter Keith, Route No. 7, Hopkinsville, 269-2275, 

886-3921 
Jordon, Robert D., Route No. 1, Lafayette, 271-2221, 

886-3921 
Kolasa, Johnny R., 103 Grundy Avenue, Springfield, 336- 

.3710 
Knowles, Robert, 5 544 Auburn Avenue, Sciotoville, Ohio, 

776-6972, 456-2410 
McClure, Thomas S., 204 Madison, Bardstown, 348-9662 
McKinney, Adelle F., 5th Field Hospital, APO San Francisco, 

96346 
Mestepey, James, P. O. Box 8, Bowling Green, 842-8123 

(Bus.) 
Miles, John K., Jr., 10709 Leelah Court, Valley Station, 937- 

0965 452-3776 
Moser, Tom, Stanford, 365-2596, 236-8077 
Newman, BUI, 2535 Ritchie, Portsmouth, Ohio, 353-6257 
Reeves, Bob, 2280 Westwood-Northern Blvd., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

481-1718, 481-1377 
Rudolph, Fred, Jr., 5600 Jeanine Drive, Louisville 
Shumaker, Thurman E., Route No. 2, Princeton, 365-65 50, 

886-3921 
Spurlin, Gaylan, Route No. 1, Greenville, 338-3255, 886-3921 
Stallard, Billie D., 699 E. Drive, Danville, 236-7189, 236- 

2551 
Thompson, Ralph N., 649 Ivyhill, Cincinnati, Ohio 
Watkins, Wendell L., 1600 Carlimar Lane, Louisville, 425- 

6516, 451-9000 
Weatherford, Charlie, 2208 S. Virginia, Hopkinsville, 886- 

7459, 886-3921 
Welker, David, 215 Wooldridge, Hopkinsville, 886-4064, 886- 

3921 



Wright, C. Dale, 2223 Davenport Drive, Apt. C-10, Lexington, 

252-1524 
Wuertz, John R., 3117 Poplar Level Road, Louisville, 636- 

2980, 267-8311, Ext. 313 

Suggestion 

A change in the basketball rules that requires substitutes 
to report to the scorers prior to the signal which ends the 
half-time intermission makes it necessary for the official 
scorebook and scorer to be at the table during all the time 
between halves. As the home-scorebook is usually the official 
scorebook, the coach of the home team is urged to have a 
statistician on the bench to keep whatever records he wants 
for use at half-time in order that scorebook may remain with 
the scorer at the table. 



The Rescheduled School Year 

(Continued from Page One) 

the Kentucky High School Athletic Association in order to 
protect the eligibility of players who might be enrolled in an 
Association member school following the plan. These obser- 
vations are entirely personal. 

The rules of the K.H.S.A.A., which are reviewed and 
amended each year by the Delegate Assembly of the 
Association, have been developed over a long period of time 
and are in general consistent with comparable regulations of 
other state associations. They represent the combined think- 
ing of Board of Control members, school administrators, 
coaches and executive officers over a period of some fifty- 
three years. Changes come slowly and rightly so. 1 would 
therefore not have the temerity to state that, if certain 
schools in Jefferson County go to the extended school year, 
the suggestions which I will make will be immediately 
written into Association regulations. I will say that, knowing 
the members of our Board of Control and the school men of 
Kentucky as I do, it is my considered opinion that these 
persons will see to it that K.H.S.A.A. regulations keep up with 
the times and are amended, if this is necessary, in such a way 
that no player passing in his work and under age will find 
himself denied eligibility if he should be attending a school 
which has gone to the plan mentioned. 

Our Scholarship Rule provides that a contestant must 
have a passing average in at least three full-credit studies 
during the current semester. Executive Secretary Sam Burke 
of the Georgia High School Association, asked for information 
concerning changes in eligibility rules made necessary because 
certain Georgia schools have adopted the four-quarter pro- 
gram, writes as follows concerning units of credit: "Inasmuch 
as the quarter plan provides for units of work rather than 
units of credit, it has been provided that four (4) hours per 
week will be the equivalent of a unit of work. Therefore, 
where a pupil on a semester basis is required to take four 
units and passing three, under the quarter plan a pupil is 
required to take 20 hours and passing 15." Some such rules 
modification or interpretation might be made in K.H.S.A.A. 
regulations. 

Our rules provide that no student who has been enrolled 
in grades 9-12 eight semesters shall thereafter be eligible, and 
that six weeks enrollment in a school shall constitute a 
semester in the interpretation of the rule. It is obvious 
that a rules change would be needed here to accommodate 
the extended school year student. Mr. Burke states that no 
changes have been made in the Georgia eight-semester rule, 
it being provided that instead of eight consecutive semesters 
the eligibility of a student will end four consecutive years 
from the date of his first entrance into grade 9. The philoso- 
phy indicated in the Georgia rules is apparently somewhat 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER 1969 



Page Five 



different from that in our K.H.S.A.A. rules. In Kentucky 
a student may find it necessary to drop out of school but 
may later return, pass in the required minimum of subjects 
for one semester, and retain his eligibility after this semester 
providing he has not reached the age limit. Considerable 
thought would be given to the matter of whether or not 
"quarter" might be substituted for "semester" in our Pre- 
ceding Semester Rule; and, if" so, the summer quarter might 
be counted in a proposed Preceding Quarter Rule. In the 
past, a student has not been able to count summer school 
work in complying with the provisions of the Preceding 
Semester Rule as it bears on enrollment. 

It is my opinion that a student who elects to attend 
school three out of four quarters should not be allowed to 
represent his school in athletic contests during any quarter 
in which he is not in attendance. The only exception to this 
might be the state championship series in baseball, golf and 
possibly tennis, which might take place after the spring 
quarter has been completed. At the present time, students 
who are eligible to compete on the last day of the spring 
semester may represent their schools in state sponsored events 
conducted after their schools have closed for the summer. 
There would be no particular reason to change this policy. 

One of our by-laws provides that a former first team 
player who changes schools with or without a corresponding 
change in the residence of his parents shall be ineligible for 
thirty-six school weeks, giving the Commissioner the author- 
ity to waive the penalty if the parents move. In effect, under 
the semester plan the period mentioned in most cases amounts 
to a full calendar year. It would be necessary to modify the 
present Transfer Rule for schools on the four-quarter plan. 
Otherwise, a player attending school for three consecutive 
quarters might transfer at the close of one season, with no 
change in the residence of the parents being involved, and 
be eligible at another school at the beginning of the season of 
the sport involved. This would defeat the purpose of the 
Transfer Rule. 

Another by-law states that any student who is eligible to 
graduate from a four-year secondary school is thereafter in- 
eligible to play on a high school team. Some rules modifica- 
tion might be necessary here. An accelerated student could be 
eligible to graduate before he has otherwise exhausted his 
eligibility. 

One by-law states that the football season shall be 
considered to begin on the opening date of school. No 
member school team may play in a game prior to this date. 
With continuous quarters some re-wording of this rule might 
be necessary. 

Member schools of the Association may participate in 
summer sports programs, with only players eligible during the 
spring semester being allowed to compete on the school teams. 
If a Preceding Quarter Rule should be adopted, certainly 
players who might be ineligible during the spring quarter 
should be allowed to play on school teams during the summer 
quarter. 

The basic Preceding Semester Rule in the Georgia and 
Kentucky associations are the same. If a pupil is out of school 
for a semester, he is required to be back in school and passing 
for a semester before being eligible. Under the quarter plan a 
pupil may be absent for one quarter. In Georgia, if the pupil 
is out for more than one quarter, then he must be back and 
passing for a full quarter before eligibility, can be established. 
In my opinion, there is considerable merit to this modifica- 
tion of the Preceding Semester Rule. 

Other possible changes in our regulations would no doubt 
be suggested by our school men. Also, if one of the other four 
plans listed by the Department of Research, Jefferson County 
Schools, were adopted, some of the rules changes suggested 
might not be relevant. As stated earlier, it is my opinion that 
K.H.S.A.A. regulations will continue to keep up with the 
times. 



SUPPLMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled October 24) 

If the telephone number is given for an official, it is the 
home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is the home phone. 
Alexander, Ronnie G., P. O. Box 320, Murray, 753-9781 
Allen, Thomas E., Route No. 1, Vine Grove, 828-3669 422- 

3412 
Arnold, BiU W., 3919 Tracy Avenue, Covington, 581-7420, 

291-6030 
Barton, Leon, P. O. Box 497, Barbourville, 546-6368, 546- 

3661 
Bennett, James L., Ashcamp, 754-5165, 639-4402 
Blackwood, Tom, 3402 Hastings Circle, Louisville, 42 5-9760 
Blevins, Boone, Jr., Staffordsville, 297-4842, 297-3738 
Bridges, Ralph L., 2424 Anne Drive, Henderson, 826-4088 
Bridgman, Don, Route No. 2, Monticello, 348-8 521 
Brizendine, Vic, 2711 Lakeside Drive, Louisville, 454-6843, 

589-9111 
Bryan, Phil, 201 Crawford Street, Apt. 212, Terre Haute, 

Indiana, 234-8328 
Campbell, John Jr., Garrett, 358-3061, 358-3461 
Cantrall, James R., 1810 Hounz Lane, Anchorage, 245-8760, 

582-5583 
Carroll, Joe E., Falcon, 349-3362, 349-3312 
Certain, Garland, Sturgis Jr. High School, Sturgis, 333-2828, 

333-4003 
Chiles, Marion, Clover Lane, Hopkinsville, 886-8692, 886- 

8692 
Conley, Charles Ray, 407 Victoria Street, Williamson, West 

Virginia 
Coomer, George M., 3474 Boston Road, Lexington, 277-8629, 

252-2312 
Cox, Jim, Garrett, 358-4206, 358-391 1 
Crager, Bobby F., 100 Clark Street, Flatwoods, 836-6069, 

836-5623 
Crouse, James Wayne, Box 276, Dixon, 639-5145 
Davenport, Bowman, P. O. Box 62, Clarkson, Leitchfield, 

259-3650, 242-3061 
Dennison, James E., 1825 James David Ct., Owensboro, 684- 

7573,684-7251 
Dockery, Donald, 2937 Igleheart Avenue, Evansville, Indiana, 

424-6589, 424-2434, Ext. 235 
Doom, Bobby W., 2209 Greenbriar, Henderson, 826-8630, 

826-9022 
Doyle, Jack Wolf, 3608 Woodruff, Louisville, 366-0268, 587- 

1121, Ext. 219 
Duggins, Michael, 10 Patricia Street, Florence, 371-8982 
Dunn, Chesley, Route No. 4, Hopkinsville, 886-4394 
Durbin, Hade, Jr., 303 Morningside Drive, Elizabethtown, 

765-7893, 765-5237 
Eades, James M., South Carrollton, 754-2689 
Eary, Edward B., Jr., 1212 Octavian Circle, Lexington, 266- 

2677 
Elmore, Jimmy A., Brandenburg, 422-2465, 422-3214 
Farish, Merlin J., 1754 Genung Drive, New Albany, Indiana, 

945-0863 
Frasure, Lois Eugene, Langley, 285-3346, 285-3346 
Frazier, Roy D., Price, 377-6344 
Fritz, Sherman, 122 Meadowlark Drive, Richmond, 623-4956, 

623-3424 
Furnish, Gary L-, 303 Bays Avenue, Morehead, 784-7646 
Gabbard, John B., Box 85, London, 864-6082, 864-2863 
Gaddie, Gary, Route No. 1, Sonora, 854-2763 
Gaines, Curtis, 1514 Young, Henderson, 826-9933, 827-3537 
Gilmore, Robert L., 630 Sayre Avenue, Lexington, 233-0085, 

277-4775 
Goff, George E., Mantewan, West Virginia 
Goins, Edgar S., Keen Hall, Western Ky. University, Bowling 

Green, 745-2198, 745-5152 
Goodman, Bobby, East View, 862-3962 

Grace, H. E., Jr., Middlesboro, 248-1290, Pineville, 337-3320 
Greer, Phil G., 208 Lakeshore, Apt. No. 16, Lexington, 269- 

2057,266-0532 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER 1969 



Hampton, Donald R., 305 Main Street, Vanceburg, 796-2562 
Harned, Vic, 216 W. Walnut, Leitchfield, 259-4149, 259-4196 
Heatherly, Warren, Cumberland College, Williamsburg, 562- 

8118 
Heidel, Neal, Georgetown, Ohio 
Hensley, Kenneth Allen, 410 Hawkins, Apt. No. 5, Carrollton, 

732-5406, 732-4411 
Hicks, Shirley Gene, Jericho Road, LaGrange, 279-6441, 

279-6336 
Hill, Jimmy P., Drakesboro, 476-8540, 338-5100 
Hill, William D., Jr., 1036 Queen, Louisville, 366-8932, 

582-5495 
Hinkle, Melvin B., 519 Dobbin Drive, Paris, 987-4201, 987- 

1235 
Hobbs, Charles V., 627 Westview, Ashland, 324-9439, 324- 

9439 
Hobgood, Jerry, 2912 Cheyenne Drive, Owensboro, 684- 

4461, 685-3121 
Holtzclaw, Russell, Stanford, 365-7318, 269-1158 
Hoskins, James E., Manchester, 598-2087, 598-5242 
Howard, Darwin, Route No. 1, Box 376, Hazard, 436-5928 

(Bus.) 
Howard, James D., P. O. Box 197, Loyall, 573-4752, 573- 

1400, Ext. 219 
Hudson, Oscar, Sassafras, 476-2567, 436-2141 
Huggins, James F., 5304 Sennridge Lane, No. 5, Valley 

Station, 935-5251 
Hughes, Paul P., 520 Riverside Drive, Prestonsburg, 886-6471, 

886-2364 
Hume, Charles E., 1009 Benson, Bowling Green, 843-3730, 

842-6335 
Hummel, Thomas, 235 East 5th Street, Newport, 581-8888, 

441-7100 
Hunley, Neil P., 672 Main Street, West Liberty, 743-4311, 

743-4513 
Hurley, Robert, Box 244, Williamson, West Virginia 
Hurt, Thomas C, 122 Hamilton Avenue, Lancaster, 793-3067, 

792-2312 
Huter, James J., 3643 Vermont Avenue, Louisville, 776-0707, 

582-2613 
Hyland, Frank Dixon, P.O.Box 465, South Webster, Ohio, 

778-2401, 456-2417 
Hyman, Alan D., 2340 Brookside Drive. Louisivlle, 454-31 19, 

454-3119 
Idol, Billy J., 124 Leafwood Road, Middlesboro, 248-2837, 

248-5560 
Ingraham, Gary J., 9706 Lanesboro Way, Louisville 
Ingraham, William R., Det. C, 12th. MP GP (CI), Ft. Knox, 

624-4898, 624-7455 
Ison. Edward Curtis, Skyline, 633-7942 
Jackson, Arthur E., Whitesburg Hospital, Whitesburg, 855- 

2891, 633-2211 
Jackson, Gary D., Route 2, Box 185, W. Paducah, 488-3272 
Jackson, Robert H., P.O. Box 76, Hitchens, 474-9456 
Jacoby, Ben, 127 Showalter Drive, Georgetown 863-0508, 

255-6812. Ext. 12 
Jago, Charles, 1740 Butler Road, Hopkinsville, 886-7633, 

886-8811 
James, Gene, 1507 So. 3rd. Street, Ironton, Ohio, 532-6976, 

532-6224 
Jamison, Mark C, 9100 Aristides Drive, Pleasure Ridge Park, 

937-6923 
Janes, Steven Thomas, 4901 Saddlebrook, Apt. 5, Louis- 
ville, 448-2194 
Jasper, Richard C, 216 11th. Street, Carrollton, 732-4623, 

732-4233 
Jeffers, James T., 118Vi Kennedy Avenue, Apt. 2, Louisville, 

896-0189 
Jenkins, Beryl M., 2326 S. 11th. Ironton, Ohio, 532-5215, 

532-3911 
Jenkins, Phillip, Box 571 Martin, 2 85-3189 
Jent, Richard, 9303 Wilcox Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio, 522-8446 
Johns, Jerry, Box 308, Somerset, 678-5610, 678-4721 
Johnson, Billy L., Monroe Drive, Russell, 836-4225, 836-4225 
Johnson, Billy Wayne, Box 85, Glendale, 854-2453 
Johnson, Gayle, RR 1, Box 683, Crestwood, 241-4615 
Johnson, Harry B., 3024 Stanford Drive, Lexington, 277- 

2889, 266-0532 
Johnson, Henry Sig, RR 8, Box 311, Benton, 527-9827, 

527-6601 
Johnson, James M., 174 Pinehurst, Frankfort, 223-2822, 

875-1535 
Johnson, Jerry L., 313 Kentucky Avenue, Georgetown, 863- 

0333, 233-2000, Ext. 3178 
Johnson, John L., Box 412, Haysi, Virginia 
Johnson, Roberts., Asbury College, Wilmore, 858-9972, 858- 

9972 
Johnson, Ronald L., 3304 Southgate, Hopkinsville, 885- 

5242, 475-4251 



Johnson, W. Bernard, Route 7, Box 286, Hopkinsville, 269- 

2208, 886-5151 
Johnson, Walter, Box 145, Hitchins, 474-5908, 474-5721 
Johnson, William E., R.R. 1, Mt. Sterling, 498-3670, 498- 

9175 
Joiner, D. Russell, P.O. Box 213, Smithland, 928-2253, 428- 

2492 
Jones, Bobby, Route 2, Box 257, Manchester, 598-5163, 5.98- 

2129 
Jones, Carson, 713 N. Main Street, Evansville, Indiana, 422- 

3069, 424-7741, Ext. 360 
Jones, Denver, Apt. 1 1 A. Highland Avenue, Hazard, 436- 

2666, 436-5771 
Jones, Frank, Route 1, Box 288, Manchester, 598-2305, 598- 

5242 
Jones, JamesErvin, 1804 Oak Street, Hopkinsville, 886-8050 

798-6903 
Jones, Joe S., 203 Green Street, Manchester, 598-3793, 598-2129 
Jones, John Howard, Route 1, Adolphus, 622-6200 
Jones, Robert L., Jr., 436 Springdale Road, Brandenburg 

422-3484, 422-2101 
Joseph, Jerry, Route 2, Kirksey, 489-3281, 489-3281 
Jude, Harold D., Matewan, West Virginia 
Jump, Frank E., 200 Elizabeth, Bowling Green, 842-8060, 843- 

4707 
Junker, Edwin G., 1045 W. Seymour Avenue, Cincinnati, 

Ohio, 821-4117 
Justice, Monty D., Jr., 8608 Perry Road, Louisville, 426- 

2693, 774-6506 
Karres, Ronald R., 705 9th. Avenue, Huntington, West Virginia 
Kasinger, W.D., 1221 Girvin Court, Owensboro, 684-7319 

683-6285 
Kays, Herbert S., 1801 Spring Drive, Louisville 
Keeling, Joe, 1944 Monroe, Paducah, 443-265 3, 442-88227 
Keeling, Reuben, 3757 Ramona Drive, Paducah, 442-4190 
Keeling, W.D., Jr., Paducah, 442-3858, 442-2157 
Keller, Terry Joe, 209 Oak Street, Ludlow, 581-8777 
Kelley, Harold M., Route 1, Scottsville, 237-4048, 583- 

5371, Ext. 267 
Kelly, Charles R., 4206 Greenwell Lane, Louisville, 447-2665 

584-1341, Ext. 204 
Kelly, Louis Link, 106 Ybrk Street, Lancaster, 792-2718 

792-3491 
Kelly William G., 421 "A" Street, Fort Knox, 624-7887 

624-1957 
Kelsch, James R., 8899 Balboa, Cincinnati, Ohio, 931-3902 

243-3696 
Kennedy, James R., 1685 Alexandria Drive, Lexington 277- 

7872, 258-9000, Ext. 2141 
Kennedy, Wayne, 533 Woodford, Bowling Green, 842-8284 

842-0361 
Kerns, Donnie Howard, 415 Morrison Avenue, Lexington, 

252-8707, 254-3358 
Kilcoyne, James D., 104 N. 15th. Street, Murray, 753- 

5289, 753-4406 
Kimmel, Jerry, Beechmont, 476-2656, 476-8375 
Kinder, Robert A., 626 Anniston Drive, Lexington, 299- 

6793, 254-3746 
King, Allen, RR 1, Box 482, Henderson, 826-9647,477-5572 
King, James A., 5000 Clarmar, Jeffersontown, 239-8015, 

778-2791 
King, Raymond H., 216 Blossom Lane, Southgate, 441-5309 

261-4357 
Kinney, Dale, 915 Monte Lane, Covington, 581-8393 
Kirk, Charles, Main, Benham, 848-2039 
Kiser, Arvle, 1102 Gainesway Drive, Lexington, 269-2426, 

254-1292 
Knauer, Glen M., 2912 Yorkshire Blvd., Louisville, 458- 

6388, 964-6469 
Knight, Bill, Paducah, 443-2775, 443-2775 
Knight, Rodney, Route 1, Greenville, 338-3535 
Knox, Edward G., HI, Normal Hall 26, Morehead, 784-4177 
Koehne, Charles Allan, 2459 Madison Road, Cincinnati, 

Ohio, 941-2400, Ext. 304 (Bus.) 
Kohls, Paul H., 5501 Sidney Road, Cincinnati, Ohio, 922- 

5265, 562-8010 
Kouns, Robert H.,Box 582, South Shore, 932-4540, 932-3323 
Korb, Danny R., 611 Hospital Road, Dawson Springs, 797- 

2014, 797-5761 
Kowalski, Joseph A., 812 Lincoln Place, Huntington, West 

Virginia 
Kratzenberg, Richard R., 2535 So. 8th. Ironton, Ohio, 532-0914 
Kuhl, Lawrence, Houser Lane, London, 864-6235, 684-4182 
Lacer, Albert Ray, Spottsville, VA7-5068, VA6-9573 
Lally James J., 3407 Gonewind Drive, Louisville, 267-6959, 

366-9511, Ext. 244 
Lambert, R.E., "Bob", 'Wurtland., 836-5843, 836-9433 
Lancaster, Glenn, 1506 Porter Drive, Henderson, 826-4364, 

826-9022 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER 1969 



Page Seven 



Landers, John F., 32 Charlemagne, Clarksville, Tennessee, 647- McEldred, Charles G., 212 Pocahontas Trail, Georgetown, 863- 



2656, 798-6805 
Landreth, Robert H., 211 Union Street, Maysville, 564- 

5041, 549-2211 
Lane, Robert M., 371 High Street. Wilmington, Ohio 382-2043 
Lansdale, Jerry, Route No. 1, Mt. Sterling, 498-0083, 4y8- 

2660 
Laskey, George O., Box M.,Beattyville, 464-2509, 464-2767 
Laubheimer, Don T.,4516Estate Drive, Louisville, 366-3880 
Laugherty, Kenneth Ray, 2100 Peabody Lane, Louisville, 451- 

1706, 584-1211 
Lawson. Rondell, Garrett, 358-3531 
Lay, William B., 1268 Gainesway Drive, Lexington, 2;66- 

5243, 233-2000, Ext. 2234 
Layne, Bert M. 
Leahy, Pat, 2907 Cromarty Way, Louisville, 459-2066, 587- 

1121, Ext. 472 
Leber, Jerry Lynn, 2331 Harrodsburg, 4, Lexington, 278- 

6931, 277-5122 
Lee, Charles J., 315 Scott Avenue, Lexington 
Lee, Gary, Mortons Gap, 258-5569 
Lee, Reggie, Mortons Gap, 258-5440 
Lee, Robert L., 6810 Dartmoor Drive, Louisville, 425-3863, 

895-2431 
Lefevers, Colman J., Kettle Island, 337-3808 
Lefevers, Keith, Kettle Island, 337-3808 
Leigh, Eugene F., 506 17th. Street, Corbin, 528-1501, 528- 

1212, Ext. 35 
Letcher, Ronnie, RR 2, Carlisle, 289-5573, 289-2208 
Levy, Arthur E., Box 74A, Williamson, West Virginia, 237- 

1171, 237-1010 
Lightfoot, Terry, 67 Rossford Avenue, Ft. Thomas, 441- 

5327, 431-4357 
Lile, Clyde F., 429 Henderson, Hopkinsville, 886-5584, 886- 

4463 
Lillie, William Westly, 3018 Taylorsville Road, Louisville, 451- 

0562, 582-2658 
Linette, James M., 1601 Newburg Road, Louisville, 451-2894, 

451-2894 
List, Frank A., 1626 Chapel Lane, Owensboro, 683-6569, 685- 

3121 
Little, Mike P. O. Box 98, Lookout, 754-837/ 
Littlepage, Pryce, 665 Echo Lane, Madisonville, 821-1642 



0927, 863-0111, Ext. 72 
McGehee, Gordon, 733 Forest Lane, Covington, 261-6880 
McGinty, L.V., Jr., P.O. Box 226, Pikeville, 437-4720, 

432-1226 
McGlasson, Galen, 212 North Bend Road, Hebron, 689-7330, 

689-7342 
McGlone, Maurice B., 213 Western Avenue, Cynthiana, 234- 

2716, 234-3753 
McKenzie, Dwight, E., 2834Vi Frankie, Ashland, 325-7081, 

324-2136. Ext. 44 
McKenzie, Robert L., 1809 Chestnut Street, Kenova, W. Va. 
McKinney, Adelle F., 5th Field Hospital, APO San Francisco, 

96346 
McLane, Albert I., Route 1, Glendale, 862-4579, 862-3924, 

(Cecilia) 
McLean, Gordon, Cody, 663-7595 
McMenama, John H., 717 Lancaster Court, Georgetown, 

863-3927, 863-3927 
McMilliam, Terry , 3054 Percy Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio, 662-9 1 06 
McNamee, Jack, 3616 Muddycreek, Cincinnati, Ohio, 922- 

5207, 241-2777 
McNeely, Albert Thomas, 301 North Wilson Avenue, Morehead, 

784-5814, 784-7528 
McPherson, Ray A, 355 Marmil Circle, S. Ft. Mitchell, 341- 

4943 
McPike, Ray S., Jr., 407 Theatre Bldg., Louisville, 451-3832, 

585-2832 
McVey, Joe E., Route 4, Mt. Sterling, 498-2318, 498-1020 
Madden, McElroy, 463 Lindberg Drive, Lexington, 255-6504, 

255-6504 
Maddox, Richard, 344 Broadway, Madisonville, 821-1841, 

821-3221 
Madon, Robert L., 314 Catalpa Street, Pineville, 337-2135, 

Frankfort 564-4610 
Maines, George E., 632 Millvale Drive, Lexington, 278-1984, 

252-2361 
Marion, James Lee, 303 Cleveland Avenue, Glasgow, 651-5241 
Marcum, Bruce, 1250 College Avenue, Barboursville, W.Va. 
Marlette, Ronald L., 1004 Delia Drive, Lexington, 278-6374 
Marshall, Glenn, Route 3, Richmond, 369-5507, 623-1530 
Marshall, T.N., 901 Comanche Court, Ashland, 324-0113, 325- 

8511, Ext. 733 
Martin, Billy, Box 173, Sharpsburg, 247-2771, 247-2421 



Lloyd, Birt Leonard, 4223 Auburn Road, Huntington, West, Martin, Charlie, Sharpsburg, 247-2141, 274-3031 



Virginia 

Lloyd, David, 615 Elm Street, Ludlow, 581-1119, 441-7100 
Lockard, Lando, Independence, 356-6325 
Logan, Doug, Box 684, Barbourville, 546-4883 
Logan, Michael, South Shore, 932-3767 
Logsdon, Thomas, 626 Cherry Street, Calvert City, 395- 

4542, 395-4664 



Martin, Donald, Route 1, Dry Ridge, 823-6221 

Martin, Harold E., 267 Loudon Avenue, Lexington, 254-0489, 

254-3816 
Martin, Woody, P.O. Box 581, Morgantown, 526-4758, 526-3384 
Mason, Edwin M., Marwill Apts. Carrollton, 732-4844, 662- 

4011 (Richmond) 
Mason, Gene A., Route 6, Mayfield, 247-7088, 653-6778 



Long, Bill, 1515 Tyler Park Drive, Louisville, 458-4989, 367- Masden, Steven Ray, Route 1, Lebanon Junction, 833-4455 



6175 
Long, George E., II, Apt. D-9 1346 Village Drive, Lexington 

254-1934 
Long,JamesE.,P.O. Box 73, Baskett, 827-5000, 827-1867 
Long, Robert F., 664 Lombardy Drive, Lexington, 299- 

7226, 252-2626 
Loudy, Kenneth, Slemp, 675-4278, 675-4278 
Lovell, Monty Joe, 429 Oak Street, Richmond, 623-1304 

623-4959 
Lowe, GeneT., Rt. 6, Box28, London, 864-5724, 864-2207 
Lowe James, Jr., 119 Valleybrook Road, Bowling Green, 842 

3734, 842-6515 
Lowery, Sanford, Route 7, Benton, 527-7133 
Luebbers, Leonard A., 1147 Woody Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio 

471-3122, 921-6430 
Lusby, George, 615 Pueblo 

863-1170 
Lusk, Tony, 5385 Pea Ridge Road, Huntington, West Virginia 
Lykins, James O., 90 Allison Drive, Florence, 371-9531 
Lytle, William Price, 219 N. Broadway, Apt. 6, Lexington, 
McCargo, Frank, 1713 E. 9th Street, Hopkinsville, 886-1948 

885-9400 
McCarley, John W., Route 1 , Russellville, 726-9456, 734-462 1 
McClain, Gerald L., Star Route, Mayfield, 247-2652,247-3101 
McClintock, Luckie Lee, 1137 Gainsway Drive, Lexington, 

266-4444 
McConnaughhay, Clyde, 112 Mulberry, Georgetown, 863-4249 



Massie, Stephen M., 10708 Milwaukee Way, Valley Station, 

937-4405 
Mathis, Mike, 8447 Foxcroft Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio, 522- 

9010, 562-6626 
Mattingly, Bernard, General Delivery, Hardinsburg, 756-5671 
Mattingly, Cecil N., 4502 Yankee Lane, 3, Louisville, 969-7634 
Mattingly, Charles Pete, 3813 Poplar Level, Louisville, 459- 

5793, 448-2761 
Mauk, Michael J., 833 Hogge Street, Morehead, 784-4412, 

Maysville, 564-5534 
Maxey, Michael, Symbol, 843-2637 

May,E.B.,Jr.,P.O. Box 185, Prestonsburg, 886-3414, 886-8661 
May, Larry, 59 W. Second Avenue, Williamson, W. Va. 
Mayer, John P., Wurtland, 768-4911 
Maynard, James Howard, Box 292, Inez, 298-3848 
Trail, Georgetown, 863-1440, Maynard, Kenneth, Box 2056, Pikeville, 432-1354, 432-1451 
Maynard, William D., 651 Indian Branch Road, Kenova, W. Va. 
Maynard, Lonme, Freeburn, 456-3563 
Maynard, Raymond Leon, Warfield, 395-5541 
Mayes, Edward, 838 Crosshill Road, Danville, 236-3264, 

236-6131 
Meade, Foster "Sid" Box 131, Vanceburg, 796-2862, 796-2811 
Meek, James D., 1825 Beech Street, Ashland, 325-4896 

836-2117 
Melear, Leland, 7306 Supremus Drive, Louisville, 935-3654, 

452-4415 
Melmige, James, Jr., Box 21 17., Williamson, W. Va. 



McCoy, Gary, 666EmersonDrive,Lexington,252-1020,252-9094 Melton, Bob, 1406 Young Street, Henderson, 827-3067, 



McCoy, Hayes, Box 265, Inex, 298-3417, 298-3417 

McCoy, Larry, 503 Wilderness Road, Louisville, 363-5180, 

459-8500 
McCuiston, John Dale, Pembroke, 475-4232, 762-6713 
McDannold, "Buddy" Lewis, 340 Ridgewood Drive, Versailles, 

873-S134, 266-1167 (Lexington) 
McGlothlin, Leonard D., 1237 Gilbert Lane, Owensboro, 

683-5242, 683-2401, Ext. 518 



827-1838 

Menefee, Charles, Route 1, Box 60, Hitchins, 474-9560 
Meredith, Denny E., Jr., 5530 Indian Oak Circle, Louisville, 

968-1793 
Metzger, Don, 9312 Cloverwood Lane, Fern Creek, 239-9813, 

239-981 3 
Meyer, Raymond F., 253 Van Voast, Bellevue, 261-3272, 341- 

9309 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER 1969 



Middleton, John, 209 l.emaur Drive, Richmond, 623-1682 

Miecarek, Chester, 718 Cindy Blair Way, Lexington 

Milbern, Daniel, 1049 Patricia Lane, Lexington, 25S-S438, 

233-2000. Ext. 2143 
Miles, John K., Jr., 10709 Leelah Court, Valley Station, 937- 

0965, 4S2-3776 
Miles, Marvin, 129 Mill Street, Henderson, 827-1788, 827- 
Miles, Robert J., 1113 W. Mill Road, Evansville, Indiana, 423- 

7419,423-7419 
Miller, Bob, 1 97 Holiday Lane, Ft. Thomas, 44 1-5885, 635-2191 
Miller, Claude, O., 704% Tenth Avenue, Huntington, W. Va. 
Miller, Edward D., Jr., 6262 Rosalind Road, Huntington, W.Va. 
Miller, Ferrel, Route 1, Murray, 435-5271, 435-5271 
Miller, Harold P., 103 East 24th Street, Benton, 527-8749, 

395-4101, Ext. 363 
Miller, James C, 1225-1 2th Street, Tell City, Indiana, 547- 

4590, 547-2311 
Miller, Jim Gordon, 2607 Garden Lake Lane, Louisville, 267- 

7013, 426-2000, Ext. 266 
Miller, Rex J., 2711 Greenway Road, Ashland, 324-5023, 

325-4706. 
Miller, Victor L., 26 Pine Hill, Highland Heights, 781-0619, 

441-9853 
Miller, William J., 292 Highland Parkway, Frankfort, 223-5357 
Moberly, Harold F., 614 Cecil Way, Lexington, 254-1862, 

277-5796 
Monahan, Ed, 6629 Plantation, Cincinnati, Ohio, 521-6582, 

681-8300 
Monks, Ronald E., 6714 Cindy Drive, Louisville, 937-6222 
Montgovery, Chester, 128 Meadowbrook Drive, Bowling Green, 

842-3214, 842-3214 
Mooneyhan, James H., 810 Henry Street, Franklin, 586-4989, 

586-4451 
Moore, Franklin, 902 Walnut Street, Dayton, 291-6000, 621- 

8770 
Moore, Marvin, Riceville 5, M.S.U., Morehead, 
Moore, Richard E., Route 3, Box 247, Mt. Vernon, Indiana, 

783-2513, 838-4886 
Moore, Robert W., Jr., 441 Forest, Erlanger, 341-6837, 563- 

1100 
Moreland, Donald J., 1 1 Lewis Street, Huntington, W. Va. 
Morgan, Billy G., 311 E. Geiger Street, Morganfield, 389- 

2752. 389-1757 
Morgan, Charles A., Route 3, Clinton, 653-6973 
Morgan, Richard, Route 6, Box 64, London, 864-6511, 864- 

5114 
Morris, Larry G., Box 71, Lewisport, 295-6673 
Morris, Paul, 404V4 Fourth Street, Williamson, W. Va. 
Morrow, Clarence E., 311 Herron Avenue, Henderson, 827- 

9589 
Morse, Richard K., 163 N. ueepwood, Radcliff, 351-3748 

624-4454 (Ft. Knox) 
Moser, Rudy day, 504 Bluff Street, Providence, 667-2997, 

667-2997 
Mounts, David G., 217 Marlene Drive, Evansville, Indiana, 423 

6930, 423-7832 
Mueller, Jack R., 4200 Leo Lane, Jeffersontown, 267-1459 

636-1381 
Mullins, Dwight. P.O. Box 125, McKinney 
Mullins, Jerry, P.O. Box 494, Mt. Vernon, 256-4486, 256 

2436 
Mullins, Larry Ben, Jenkins, 832-2235, 832-2235 
Mullins, Lloyd G., Jr., 412 Outtmlw Avenue, Whitesburg 

633-5015, 633-2221 
Murphy, Tom, 1002 Forest Hill Drive, Frankfort 227-7956 

227-4439 
Murrell, Allen L., 1804 Woodhurst Drive, Bowling Green 

842-1286 
Napier, Charles Michael, Chavies, 436-3686 
Napier, Wallace Reed, Jr., Cumberland College, Williamsburg 

573-3721 
Nash, Dennis, 7330 Ticonderoga Drive, Louisville, 361-1945, 

447-3442 
Ness, Max A., 613 CoUege Court, Murray, 762-4383 
Nethercutt, Bill, 82 Sycamore Street, Huntington, W. Va. 
Newcomb, Bobby, 114 Sunset Drive, Campbellsville, 465- 

7552, 465-S461 
Newman, BUI, 2535 Ritchie. Portsmouth. Ohio. 353-6247 
Newman. Larry, 3219 N. Taibot, Dept. 7, (Bus. 261-9603) 

Newsome, William, Jr., Route 1, Harold, 478-5508, 478-2255 
Nichols, Billy Joe, 398 East Sixth Street, Russellville, 726-7330 
Nichols, Lewis D., 1213 E. Main Street, Greenup, 473-4281 
Nieland, Douglas, 298 Second Street, Richmond, 623-7706, 

622-3646 
Nieto, William, Jr., Asbury College, Wilmore, 858-9987 
Noel, John W. (Pete), 31 E. 43rd. Street, Covington, 291-7739, 

231-6685 
Norwood, Thomas Richard, 811 Henry Street, Franklin, 586- 

3614, 586-3541 
Nunnelley, Steve. Lancaster Court, Georgetown, 863-3927 
Nunnelley, Steve, Roselawn Drive, Williamstown, 824-4557, 

824-4104 
Nuss, Albeit M_ 7706 Kim Drivej Louisville, 367-6791. InB- 
O'Connell, Jim, 108 Mound Avenue, Milford, Ohio, 831- 

0744, 831-1900 
O'Keefe, Thomas, 9358 Gina Drive, West Chester, Ohio, 

777-6897, 563-0220 
Oldham, John H., Prospect, 228-1698 



Oiler, Jerry, 1967 Goldsmith Lane, Apt. A- 10, Louisville, 

458-9761, 459-1030 
Omer, Harold G., 150 N. Crestmoor, Louisville 
O'Nan, Norman, Route No. 1, Henderson, 827-3968, 826- 

9578 
Orem, Dale L., 409 Chippewa Drive, Jeffersonville, Indiana, 

283-8225, 636-4151 
Oaborn, Philip, 1401 Paul Avenue, Louisville, 368-2058 
Osborne, Gary Lee, Route No. 3, Eubank, 379-5241, 379- 

5241 
Osborne, Homer, P. O. Box 31, Melvin, 938-2580 
Osbourn, Joseph A., 9814 Northridge Drive, Valley Station, 

935-1980 
Osting, Lawrence J., 1221 Bates Court, Louisville, 451-2070 
Otis, Bill, Route No. 2, Hodgenville, 358-3615 
Overby, Jerry L., Route No. 6, Murray, 436-2454, 753-1250 
Overton, Frank, Jr., Box 36, Four Mile, 337-2026 
Owens, Bruce E., P. O. Box 917, Harlan, 573-1686, 573-1661 
Owens, Bruce V., P. O. Box 12, New Castle, 346-5348, 346 

8431 
Owens, Roy, Route No. 4, Box 71, London, 864-7489 
Pack, James, Starribaugh, 265-4848, 789-5273 
Pack, James, Route No. 1, Box 189, T^aGrange, 279-5005, 

241-8321 
Padgett, R. K., 112 Richardson Drive, Somerset, 678-5485, 

678-4141 
Park, J. M., 5601 Benton Highway, Paducah, 898-2785 
Parkey, Cecil Edward, 109 Greenwood Road, Middlesboro, 

248-6148, 445-4094 
Page, James N., P. O. Box 64, Pineville, 337-3814, 337-3814 
Pardue, Israel L., 1055 S. 28th, Louisville, 772-2488, 774- 

6431 
Parker, Francis V., 208 Rosemont, Providence, 667-2224, 

667-2224 
Parrott, Lanny L., Box 174, CamphelUville, 465-8741,465- 

8741 
Parsons, Fred, Box 129, Cumberland, 589-2336, 589-4625 
Partin, Billy Ray, Box 41, Four Mile, 337-3185, 337-3284 
Partin, Boiling S., Box 66, NIMH Clinical Research Center, 

Lexington 
Parrish, Willie, 161 East Washington Street, Winchester, 744- 

2903, 744-7384 
Patterson, Bill E., 257 Lake Street, Madisonville, 821-1359, 

821-6833 
Patterson, Temme J., 2216 Ridgecrest Drive, Evansville, Indi- 
ana, 476-9026, 425-1 S45 
Paulin, Al, 538 Franklin, Tel City, Indiana, 547-3323 
Payne, Gayle, Bethlehem, 878-5980 
Paxton, Gary R., Route No. 2, Versailes Road, Lexington, 

252-0570, 252-0570 
Pedigo, Albert M., 610 Gheens Avenue, Louisville, 368-1283, 

459-5506 
Pence, William Jerry, 329 Church Street, Vine Grove, S77- 
2368, 877-2210 
Penner, Merritt D., Jr., Route No. 4, Box 739, Manchester, 

598-3711 
Percifield, Morris, 245 Rodes Avenue, Lexington, 252-7879 
Perkins, Ronnie L., Route No. 2, Upton, 373-5051, 767-2311 

(Elizabeth town) 
Perry, Clyde T., Georgetown, 863-2057, 254-0386 
Perry, James E., Route No. 6, Paducah, 554-2945, 554-1706 
Phelps, Ralph Rudy, Box 84, Ashland, 836-3670, 325-8511, 

Ext. 258 
Phelps, Ray, Box 533, Russell, 836-6646, 928-6533 
Phillippi, Jackie E., 3817 Feather, Erlanger, 341-0162, 331- 

0080 
Phillips, Thomas M., Pikeville, 639-4152, 432-3380 
Phipps, James M., P. O. Box 285, Heidrick, 546-6334, 528- 

361 1 (Corbin) 
Pietrowski, Paul, 108 Bishop, Corbin, 528-6391, 528-1630 
Ping, Denton, Eubank, 379-3221, 379-4661 
Pittman, Spencer R., Wayne Street, Science Hill, 423-3115, 

678-4519 
Plate, Arthur C.,6213 Kenwood Hills Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

561-4105, 891-9091 
Poe, James R., Benton, 527-9537 
Pope, Roy T., Route No. 5, Box 183, London, 864-4039, 

864-2491 
Poppas, Nicholas. 1996 Republic, Dayton, Ohio, 277-2773, 

233-6431 
Power, Michael Joseph, 1306 N. Ann Drive, Bardstown, 348- 

6371. 2S2-231 1 
Powers, Clark, 908 Walker Avenue, Paris, 987-5513, 4-1717 

(Ft. Knox) 
Powers, Elmer, Route No. 2, Box 29A, Ashland, 324-5485, 

325-8421 
Prater, Billie J., Box 191, W. Prestonsburg, 886-3059 
Prater, Randel R., Hueysville, 358-4019 
Prather, Clinton R., Route No. 1, LaGrange, 279-5812, 

279-5812 
Preece, John C, Lenore High School, Lenore, W. Va. 
Price, Don M., 103 Congress, Evansville, Indiana, 477-8678, 

477-8944 
Price, James E., Route No. 4, Box 22, Liberty, 787-7296, 

787-6323 
Price, Terry, Mt. Olivet, 724-3225 
Prichatd Glenn W. WarfieUJ. 393-3250. 393-3200 
Primm, James T., Route No. 1, Lafayette Road, Hopkinsvilte, 

885-9483 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER 1969 



Page Nine 



Prince, Billie Welton, Clinton, 013-4167 

Priode, Charles E„ Route No. 3, Box 767, South Point, 377- 

2289 
Profitt, Lawrence K., Route No. 5, Winchester, 744-3409, 

233-2000, Ext. 3291 
Pruitt, Donald W., Route No. 1 , Clinton, 653-6438 
Pruitt, John Raldall, Route No. 3, Clinton 
Pryor, Charles W., 8939 Applewood Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

791-0073 
Purdy, Jesse, 5405 Johnsontown Road, Louisville, 937-5086 
Pyle, John Wayne, 9 1 1 '/ 2 Central, Hopkinsville, 886-8197, 

798-3316 
Quisenberry, James M., 1900 Farnsley Road, Louisville, 448- 

6152, 366-0940 
Raby, Billy G., Route No. 2. Hopkinsville, 886-3206 
Racke, Jerry W., Ill Orchard Lane, Alexandria, 635-2446, 

635-2191 
Rader, Douglas, P. O. Box 182, McKee, 287-7326 
Rains. Richard, 943 Spring Street, Covington 
Ramey, Gary, Route No. 1, Morehead, 784-5079 
Ramey, Herbert D., Farmers, 784-4724, 784-7726 
Rash, Lindell L., P. O. Box 278. Mortons Gap, 258-51 36 , 

258-5362 
Ratliff, James D., Route No. 1, Box 480, Pikeville 
Ratliff, William C, Route No. 1. Fordsville, Ohio, 276-5291, 

276-3601 
Ravenscraft, Glendon A., 39 Newman Avenue, Ft. Thomas, 

441-5991, 635-2195 
Redle, Joel Edward, 1116 Forrest Street, Louisville, 635-2379. 

452-3074 
Redman, Carl J., Route No. 4, Mt. Vernon, Indiana, 838-4632, 

838-4468 
Redman. Melvin P., Route No. 3, Mt. Vernon, Indiana, 783- 

2276, 838-3791 
Reed, Andrew, Elsie 
Reed, Charles R.. 102 Elizabeth Street, Versailles, 873-4213, 

252-1122 (Lexington) 
Reed, Gordon (Moe), 22 Riverside Parkway, Fort Thomas, 

441-4946 
Reed, Stephen C, Elsie, 349-2485 
Rees. Gayle, 1829 Dalna Drive, Lexington, 299-7316, 299- 

1221, Ext. 6231 
Reeves, Curtis R., 112 Londonderry Drive, Lexington, 254- 

6412 (Bus.) 
Reherman, Fred, 2805 Woodmont Drive, Louisville, 459- 

6573, 425-5076 
Reinhardt, Myron S., Box 248, Route No. 2, Alexandria, 635- 

5724, 635-91 13 
Reliford, Paul Glenn, 4130 Cabell Street, Ashland, 32S-7457, 

836-3844 
Reule, Ronald W., 41 Castle Villa Park, Aberdeen, 795-2395, 

564-3449 
Reuther, James R., 2009 Goldsmith Lane, Apt. No. 5, Louis- 
ville, 425-5076 (Bus.) 
Rexroat, Jerry L., 7424 Jamaica Drive, Louisville, 935-21 16, 

447-3221 
Rhodes, Cecil, P. O. Box 291, Barbourville, 546-4777 
Rice, William L., 3011 Jefferson, Evansville, Indiana, 477- 

3676, 425-5409 
Rich, Dennis W., Box No. 5, Verona, 485-7233. 291-9955 
Richardson, James E., 2 1 3 Whittier Drive, Owensboro, 684- 

3956 
Richardson, Robie, Route No. 2, Cecilia, 369-43 82 
Richeson, King, Midway Jr. College, Midway, 846-2612, 846- 

3431 
Ricketts, Donald R., 32 5 Audubon Drive, Mt. Vernon, Indi- 
ana, 838-5206 
Rigdon, Kenneth, Route No. 2, Scottsville, 622-4047, 842- 

5624 
Riggs, Floyd L.. Route No. 8, Box 400, Evansville, Indiana,' 

867-3090, 425-3346 
Ring, Bill, 481 Rookwood Parkway, Lexington, 299 7089, 

255-8492 
Rister, Edgar L., Garrett, 358-4428 
Ritter, Goebel, 415 Cornelia Avenue, Whitesburg, 633-7164, 

633-4455 
Roark, Forrest G., 634 Emerson Drive, Lexington, 252-0742, 

299-1221, Ext. 3201 
Roberts, Donald, Bob-A-Link, Harrodsburg, 734-4765, 734- 

3673 
Roberts, Phillip E., Route No. 2, Box 248-B, Newburgh, Indi- 
ana, 853-8087 
Robinson, Alford M., 2152 Sage Road, Lexington, 277-7551, 

299-4381 ' 
Robinson, D. Blake, Box 2462, Pikeville, 432-3269, 427- 

6286 
Robinson, Don L., 2012 Poplar Stmt, Kenova, W. Va. 
Robinson, Harvey Lewis, Box 579, Pikeville, 432-2895, 432- 

3380 
Rodgers, Tom H„ 327 Scott, Madisonville, 821-7312, 338- 

3800 
Roe, Doyle "Buddy", Jr., Isom, 633-2973, 633-2961 
Roeckers, Bernard, 2738 Caledon Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

231-2603, 831-2990 
Roesel, Josephf 429 Pickett Drive, Lookout Heights, 331- 

1880. 581-1322, Ext. 239 
Rogers, Eldridge, 310 Talbert. Hopkinsville, 885-5571. 885- 

3921 



Rogers, Howard D.. 17 Maryland Avenue, Winchester, 744- 

1785, 299-1221, Ext. 41 1 I (Lexington) 
Rogers, Selbert A., 15 Ford Street, Prestonsburg, 886-6297. 

886-3834 
Roller, Otis, 808 Chamberry Drive, Louisville, 895-6256, 

587-1 121, Ext. 396 
Romans, Jerrv, 2137 East Lane, Louisville, 448-3233 
Rose, Walter Scott, Box 54, Hazel Green, 662-4516, 662- 

4615 
Rosen, William, Box 2197, Williamson, W. Va. 
Ross, Bill T., 1201 Grandview Drive, Catlettsburg, 739 4018, 

739-9910 
Ross, Harold L., Box 344, Elkton, 265-2493, 265-2506 
Rouse, Donald, Box 714, Williamson, W. Va. 
Ruggles, James G., P. O. Box 374, Winslow, Indiana, 789- 

2551 
Runyon, Tommy Dean. Box 181, Belfry, 353-7883, 353- 

7916 
Russell, Allen, 1503 Sycamore, Murray, 753-2832. 444631 1, 

Ext. 378 
Russell, Howard "Joe," 30 Roberts Court, Leitchfield, 259- 

4304 
Russell, Jake, 128 North Main. Hartford, 298 3585, 274- 

3366 
Russell, Richard. Route No. 2, Box 209, Hazard, 25 1-2916 
Russman, Godfrey F., Jr., 1041 Goss Avenue, Louisville, 969- 

2175, 635-7426 
Sagers, Robert M., 494 Morrvue Drive, Cincinnati. Ohio, 922- 

8230, 721-5240, Ext. 33 
St. Clair, Robert, 4306 Leaf Drive, Louisville, 361-2493, 

366-0326, Ext. 15 
Salyer, Henry Edsel, 4817 Bluebird, Louisville, 969-6271, 

634-151 1. Ext. 71 
Sammons, Terry Lynn, 4308 Burnt Cedar Lane. Louisville. 

964-0852, 587-1 121, Ext. 252 
Sams, Glenn, Millers Village, Auburn, 542-61 39, 84 3-1 1 83 
Sanders, Mel, 4300 Kimberly Court, Paducah, 442-3650, 564- 

4081 (Illinois) 
Sandusky, Jerry, Route No. 1 . Liberty, 787-7742, 787-7484 
Saylor, Ray, 800 Lila Drive, Milford, Ohio, 831-9047 
Saylors, Carlee, Route No. 6, Murray, 753-7979. 924-5602 
Scent, James Albert, Box 175, Barbourville, 546-4380 
Schad, James, 816 Yorkhaven Road, Springdale, Ohio, 825- 
3343, 825-3397 
Schildmeyer, Paul. 78 Albert Street. Cincinnati. Ohio, 861- 

6480, 241 2166 
Schleicher. Richard L., Route No. 2. Borden, Indiana, 246- 

3232, Louisville, 582-5610 
Schmidt, Thomas Cyril, 4207 Norene Lane, Apt. No. 1. 

Louisville, 969-7780, 582-5521 
Scott, Bill, 1816 McDonald Road, Lexington. 278-2844. 

2S4-1313 
Scott, Emmanuel H., 1614 Porter Place, Cincinnati. Ohio, 

281-6928, 961-0022 
Scott, Jerry, 1122 Spendthrift. Lexington. 266-0910. 252- 

4923 
Scott, Travis Paul. Route No. 2. Box 317. Russell Springs. 

866-1 133, 384-2933 
Scott, Willie L., 2 1 7 Showalter Drive. Georgetown, 863-3757. 

863-3321 
Sears. Wilson, 445 Trailridge Road. Brandenburg, 422-2805. 

422-3214 
Seavers, Joe, 2517 Ann Street. Ludlow, 341-02 1 3, 291-8925 
Sellier, Ed, 520 Circlewood Drive, Lexington, 299-8042. 299- 

4027 
Selvy, Curt, 1 18 Earl, Corbin, 528-4677. 528-3737 
Serey, George E., Jr., 8 16 Winchester Avenue. Ashland. 324- 

5768, 325-851 1. Ext. 509 
Sesher, James. 7091 Manderlay Drive. Florence. 371-8128, 

751-8187 
Settle. Roy G.. 2586 Windsor Avenue, Owensboro. 683-0008. 

683-4563 
Sexton, Steven Carroll, 9126 F.dmonston Terrace, Greenbelt. 

Md., 474-459 1, 964-4815 
Sharp, Ronnie, P. O. Box 304. Middlesboro. 248-3916, 248- 

3450 
Shaver, Perry A.. Box 154. Bremen, 525 3493. 525-3551 
Shaw, Donald Lee. 605 Bell Avenue. Campbellsville. 465- 

8631, 465-8158 
Shaw, Earl, 121 Hagan Court, Lancaster. 792-2370.548-3391 
Shaw. James Kelly, P. O. Box 163. Eddyville, 388-7913. 

388-2211 
Shearer, Robert L.. 840 West Vine Street. Radcliff. 351-5331. 

624-7252 
Shemwell, Bobby W., Route No. 7,Gienview Drive. Glasgow. 

678-4339, 651-391 I 
Shewmaker. Treffert, 634 Longview Drive. Lexington, 277- 

91 17 255-1481, Ext. 39 
Shewmaker. Wayne. 206 W. Meadow Drive, Clarksville. Tenn.. 

647-7351 
Shipp, David K., 16 E. Southgate, Ft. Thomas. 781-1 163 
Shope. Lowell M.. P. O. Box 266. South Webster. Ohio. 778- 

2425, 259-2356 
Showalter. John. 1 16 Military, Georgetown, 863-1892 
Shuck, Thomas G.. 2073 Williamsburg. Lexington. 277-8780. 

278-5713 
Simons. Ray IX, 3489 Landsdown Drive. Bid. D. Apt. 19. 

Lexington. 278 9184. 621-8360 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER 1969 



Simpson. I'red C. 20 Oak Street, Ft. Mitchell. 331-3251. 

681-6150. Ext. 59 
Sims, Frank D.. 5303 Regent Way. Louisville. 964-6493. 634- 

1511. Kxt. 259 
Sims. Tom M.. Route No. 5. Hillcrest. Richmond, 623 1530 

(Bus.) 
Singer, Tony. Route No. 1. Cecilia. 862-4358. 769-231 1 
Singleton, Bobby L., 5711 Omega, Louisville. 937-4712, 

452-3673 
Singleton. Jerry, Route No. I, Rockpoit, 274-4716 
Singleton, Ronnie H.. 3316 Radiance Road, Louisville, 459- 

4199, 772 3661, Kxt. 2253 
Sizemore. Aster. 29 Sunvalley Terrace, Hazard. 436-3402. 

436-2107 
Skaggs. Bobby L.. Route No. 4, Box 335. Russell Springs. 

866-4342 
Skaggs. Robert L., P. O. 372, Leitchfield. 259-3438. 259 

4144 
Small, Bill, 1846 Mary Catherine Drive, Louisville, 448-4859, 

584-6308 
Smallwood, Orville. Route No. 4, Box 268, London, 264- 

2716 
Smith, Benny. Route No. 3, Box 5. Manchester, 598-2461 
Smith, Gary U., 107 St. May's Lane. Waverly. Ohio, 947- 

4627, 947-2153 
Smith, James Gayle, Box 202, Burlington, 586-6048, 586- 

7200 
Smith, James H.. Route No. 1. Box 437, South Shore, 

932-4497 
Smith. Roy M.. Watts. 666-7775 (Bus.) 
Smith, Swonnie Lee, P. O. Box 48'', Mt. Vernon, 453-9061 

(Bus.) 
Smith Thomas W.. 2915 Sheldon Road, Louisville, 4 58-3934, 

583-4871 
Smith, Virginia L., Route No. 1. Baxter, 573-2488 
Smith. Wayne N.. 313 Beechwood Drive, Campbellsville, 

465-5268, 384-2751 (Columbia) 
Smith, Willard N.. P. O. Box 23. Campbellsville. 465-5339, 

465-4193 
Smith, William E., 4122 St. John's Tr., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

791-3082, 731-2341, Ext. 268 
Smith, Winfred C. Route No. 1, Box 430, Hazard, 398-7176 

(Bus.) 
Smith, W. Jack. 203 Ohio, Somerset, 679-1211. 252-6602 
Smithson, Richard A., 821 Palatha Road, Louisville, 368- 

2853, 935-2948 
Snodgrass, Jack D., 272 Foote. Bellevue. 291-0559 
Snow, James A., Route No. I . WiMiamstown, 824-5 165 
Snow, Robert, Route No. 2. Williamstown, 824-4940. 371- 

1221 
Sparks, Keith E.. Jr.. 6600 Watch Hill Road, Louisville, 239- 

9093, 366-951 1, Ext. 273 
Sparrow, John Allen, 468 E. Main Street. Richmond, 623- 

1687 
Spencer, Irv.. Old State Road, Brandenburg. 422-3294, 937- 

2300 
Spiceland.S. E.. 305 So. 13th Street. Murray, 753-281 1. 753- 

9031 
Spoonamore, Jim, 111 Pettus Court, Stanford, 365-2348, 

233 2000, Ext. 2538 
Spurlin, Gaylan L.. Route No. 1, Greenville, 338-3255 
Stagnolia, Reecie, P. O. Box 742, Lynch, 848-2 884, 848- 

3450 
Stallard, Nathan H., Evarts. 837-2226. 573-9038 
Stanley. James H., 105 Cherry Street. Pineville, 337 -3900, 

337 2510 
Stark, Douglas O., Route No. 2, Bedford, 255-7189 
Starling, Edward, 819 Vinson Street, Williamson, W. Va. 
Staten, Gordon Lee, Route No. 2, Falmouth. 654-8660, 

654-3977 
Steele, Michael James, RR No. 2, Box 207, Somerset, 678- 

8722 
Steeley, Robert W., Blair Funeral Home, Whitesburg, 633- 

7880, 633-2284 
Steenken, William R., 1636 Highland Pike, Covington, 331- 

3789, 431 3108 
Stephens, Herbert D.. 133 First Street, West Ceredo, W. Va. 
Stephens, Robert Gene, 100 East Leesway, Lexington, 254- 

4793 
Stephenson, Harry S., 1612 Hawthorn, Lexington, 299-1757, 

233-8310 
Stethen, James E., Box 134. Bedford, 255-3285 
Stevens, James L., 1 10 Hamby Avenue, Dawson Springs, 797- 

2966, 797-2017 
Stewart, Eddie V., Box 267, Langley, 285-3054 
Stewart, James, 2164 Sherwood, Louisville, 459-2329 
Stiff, Maurice E., Jr., 2150 Glenworth Avenue, Louisville, 

454-7808 i8.5-.2995 
Stikeleathei, Clyde Lewis, P. O. Box 173. Leitchfield. 259 

3885, 259-3161 
Stinson, Charles L., 105 Bedford Court, Horse Cave, 786- 

2663 
Stoess, Henry L.. 314 Kavanaugh Road, Crestwood, 241- 

4196. 451-0142 
Stokes, Robert K., 2725 Hillview Drive, New Albany, Indiana, 

945-9014, 637-0411 
Stone, Sidney P., 611 S. Morgan, Morganfield, 389-3962. 

389-1531 



Stout, Robert C, Box 352, Versailles, 873-5278 

Strain, Richard P., P. O. Box 472. Radcliff, 351-4306, 624- 

2214 
Strasburger, Charles, Bogle Trailer Park, Lot No. 1, Russell- 

ville Rd., Bowling Green, 879-6263 
Stratman, Richard N., 3035 Rosedale Blvd., Louisville, 459- 

5361 
Streible, Ronnie, 148 Penmoken, Lexington, 277-0683, 

255-2865 
Strickland, Herbert C, 105 Friar Drive, Clarksville, Tenn., 

647-7477, 798-3709 
Strong, Arnett, 116 Ky. Blvd., Hazard, 436-3938, 436-2141 
Strong, Charles F., 4597 Orange Drive, Louisville, 964-3698 
Stump, Phillip, 105 Richmond Street, Lancaster, 792-3143, 

792-3491 
Sucietto, Dick, 6572 Gaines Road, Cincinnati, Ohio, 521- 

7495, 761-4130, Ext. 310 
Sullivan, Dan L., 307 Ludford, Ludlow, 431-5949, 261-821 1 
Sullivan, Don Chris, 2083 Old Nassau Road, Lexington, 277- 

6953, 277-6953 
Sumner, Carl, 3133 Doreen Way, Louisville, 454-7294, 

459-1030, Ext. 205 
Swarts, Joseph, 135 Lane Street, (ronton, Ohio, 532-9349 
Swope, Thomas, 303 Dayton Pike, Dayton, 441-6285 
Tackett, Archie, Inez, 298-3445, 784-9903 (Morehead) 
Tapscott, Ozzie, 2316 Seneca Lane, Paducah, 554-2606 
Tarry, W. R. Bud. Route No. 5, Glasgow, 678-2539 
Tarvin, Roger Wayne, 421 S. Third Street. Nicholasville, 885- 

3509 
Tate, Harold D.. Route No. 1, Box 1 1 5 A, Ashland, 928- 

9450, 324-3840 
Taylor, Charles Andrew, 2059 Georgian Way, Lexington, 

278-6832, 254 8282 
Taylor, Ed., 435 N. 41st Street, Louisville, 772-0126, 584- 

6311 
Taylor, Jesse, Route No. 2, Box 354-A, Middlesboro, 248- 

3953, 248-1000 
Taylor, Jim (J. T.), 8304 Glaser Lane, Fern Creek, 239-8785. 

587-1 121, Ext. 265 
Taylor, Ricky D., 304 Howard Street, Ludlow, 291-9113, 

581-7946 
Teague, Donald A., P. O. Box 192, Nortonville, 676-3206 
Tegethoff, Kenneth, Route No. 2, Henderson, VA7-3944 
Thomas, Billy G., 2333 Quinn Drive, Louisville, 448-1463, 

366-9561, Ext. 360 
Thomas, Frank M., 629'/i S. 44th Street, Louisville, 774-2624 
Thomas, Paul E., P. O. Box 435 A, Franklin Furnace, Ohio 

574-51 11, 574-51 11 
Thompson, Houston C, 513 East 20th, Covington, 581- 

8594, 261-4425 
Thompson, Kenneth E., 4201 Pine Street, New Boston, Ohio, 

456-4032, 456-4626 
Thompson, Jack, 2347 Saratoga Drive, Louisville, 452-9255, 

454-4585 
Thompson, Larry, Box 36, Mt. Sterling, 498-3346, 498- 

2660, Ext. 58 
Thompson, Tom D., 97 Carran Drive. Fort Mitchell, 341- 

1809, 581 -1322, Ext. 211 
Thompson. William D.. 2115 Chippewa Drive, Circleville, 

Ohio, 474-2384, 469-5388 
Thornton, Bryce C, 1115 Forest Court, Ashland, 325-3646, 

928-6414 
Thruman, Jackie, White Mills 
Ticknor, William, 249 S. Limestone, Lexington, 254-0410, 

255-1461, Ext. 206 
Tierney, Larry Wayne. Reynolds Station, 233-4028 
Tillery, James Carl, C/O Britt's Department Store, Richmond, 

623-7177 (Bus.) 
Tines, Ronald W., Skyline Mobile Home Park, No. 24, Bow- 
ling Green, 781-2007, 842-1681 
Tolle, Charles W., 604 Skyview Drive, Cynthiana, 234-3351, 

334-2010 
Toy, Charles K., Route No. 4, Mt. Sterling, 498-1900 
Toy, Donny, Route No. 1. Sharpsburg, 247-321 1. 845-2551, 

Ext. 240 
Trapp. Charles W., 34 Trapp Court, Alexandria 
Trapp, Raymond H„ 823 Wedeking Avenue, Evansville, 

Indiana, 425-1190, 425-3501 
Tremaine, Darrell E., Route No. 3, Berea, 986-4577 
Trimble, James Darrell, Frenchburg, 768-3741 
Trimer, Norman E., 1927 Taffeta Drive, Valley Station, 

937-4452, 447-9165 
Triplet!, Herbert W., Route No. 1, Mt. Sterling, 498-2520, 

233-2000, Ext. 3492 
Trombley, Norman J., 150 Penmoken Park, Lexington, 278- 

6296 
Tucker, Neal R., Hopkinsville, 885-5492, 886-4463 
Tuttle, Quinton, Route No. 1, Box 494, Pikeville, 432-3566 
Tyre, Donald, 316 Senate Drive, Frankfort, 223-3668, 254- 

6612, Ext. 244 (Lexington) 
Urlage, Richard, 822 Highland, Ft. Thomas 441-5513, 471- 

8120 
Vanhook, Samuel, Route No. 3, Cynthiana, 234-2336, 234- 

3253 
Vanover, J. W., Jackhorn, 855-7730, 633-2168 
Vanover, Wiley G., Jackhorn, 855-2441, 669-6194 
Van Zant, Jim, Box 602, Williamson, W. Va. 
Varble, William, 3108 Widgeon Avenue, Louisville, 635- 
6930, 772-2509 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER 1969 



Page Eleven 



Vescovi, Raymond B., 3525 Laurel Avenue. Evansville, Indi- 
ana, 423-8144, 963-3366 
Vest, Jewell R., 66 Emerson Drive, Lexington, 254-2025 

299-1221, Ext. 6169 
Vest. Thomas, Route No. 2. Hazel Green. 725-5383 
Vickery, Dan D.. 108 High Street. Monticello 
Vinciguerra, Phillip. Matewan. W. Va. 
Vinson, Ray T., Route No. 4. Campbellsville, 465-8625 
Vipperman. Al, Ransom, 427-7060, 353-7362 
Vories, Dick, 1211 Wilson Road, Bellevue, 781-1391, 541 

0728 
Wagner. Marvin Rudy, Route No. I, Box 445, Pikeville, 437 

461 1, 432-3380 
Walker, James C, Route No. 1, Clinton, 653-4149, 653-24 51 
Wallace, Curt, Route No. 2, Box 458A, Somerset, 679-3856. 

679- 1574 
Wallen. Howard W., Williamsport, 789-3066. 789-4215 
Waller, Bobbie E., 309 Strathmore. Lexington, 299-6123 

299-6123 
Wallin, Charles "Jug," 668 Northside Drive, Lexington, 299 

8639, 299-1221. Ext. 4251 
Walters, Darwin. Route No. 2. Box 99, Shepherdsville, 543 

2615, 957-2160 
Ward, Donald E., Milo, 298-3502, 298-3471 
Ward, Robert L., 2040 Washington, Henderson, 827-3805 
Watkins, James R., 1607 Thornberry, Louisville, 368-4032 

368-65 19 
Watkins, Wendell L.. 1600 Clarimar Lane, Louisville, 425 

6516, 451-9000 
Watts, Erank C, F. O. Box 145, Bardstown, 348-3977 

348-3363 
Walts, Leon, Route No. 1, Box 576, Hazard, 436-5035 
Wavne, Bill T., Route Nc. 1, Box 501, Henderson, 826-9441 
Weas, Larrv J., 1924 Goldsmith Lane, No. 4, Louisville, 459 

8156, 587-1 121, Ext. 242 
Weaver, Clyde Ivan, Box 254, Williamson, W. Va. 
Weaver, Ray. 3117 Bernard Drive, Edgewood, 341-2610, 341 

8066 
Webb, Albert N., 244 Wayne Street, Manchester, 598-2745 
Webb, Dudley. 905 Summerville Drive, Lexington, 252-2090 

254-7318 
Webb, James Otis, Box 94, Horse Cave, 786-2195, 786-2195 
Weber, Thomas C. 3701 St. Germaine, Louisville, 896-4298 
Wedding, Tommy, Route No. 1. Morganfield. 568-2833 
Weihe, Robert J.. 1840 Yale Drive, Louisville, 459-6397, 

776-2400 
Weiner, Richard A., 1518 Corvallis Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

821-2568. 761-4130, Ext. 264 
Welch, Donald G., Route No. 2, Worthville, 732-5575. 732- 

4346 
Welch, Ronald J., Route No. 3, Milton, 268-5970 
Wells, Andy, APO South, Box 148, FPO, New York, 09524 
Wells, Glenn, 517 Edgar Court, Erlanger, 341-0481, 872-5764 
Wesche, James A., 1704 Chickasaw. Lexington, 299-8058, 

252-2312 
West, Jack Lynn, Route No. 3. Maysville. 564-6505 
West, John F., Route No. 4, Hickman, 236-3295, 236-2521 
Westerfield, James C, Route No. 1. Box 312. Manchester, 

598-2693, 598-3138 
Wetzel, Don, 2906 Cheyenne Drive, Owensboro, 685-1071, 

683-6446 
Wetenkamp, Larry, 914 Alhambra, Park Hills, 581-9396, 

681-6154 
Weyer, James, 42 Scenic View Drive, Et. Thomas. 781-2220 , 

341-5800 
Wheeler, Donald Wayne, Route No. 2. Alvaton, 842-7807. 

843-3031 
Wheeler, Resvie, West Liberty. 522-4496, 743-3705 
White, David B., 120 Media Drive, Bowling Green, 84 3-3884 

843-6017 
Whitley, James, 208 Cranewood Drive, Tranton, Ohio, 988- 

6740. 771-8200 
Whitt, Hobert E., Jr.. P. O. Box 612, Russell, 836-3575, 836- 

4212 
Whitt, Jim, Box 37, North Matewan, W. Va. 
Whitt, Jimmy E., Sandy Hook, 738-5471 

Whorley, Larry, 1228 Venable Avenue, Owensboro, 684-7418 
Wickham, James Robert, 311 Cathedral Manor, Bardstown, 

348-5282, 833-4611 
Wihebrink, James A., 138 Fairfield Avenue. Bellview. 291- 

3710 
Wilcher, Jerry H., McKinney, 346-4741 (Bus.) 
Wilcox, Ursal Ray, Auxier. 886-3329, 886-2703 
Williams, Jack A., 1539 MacArthur Drive, Evansville, Indiana, 

476-8876, 424-4201 
Williams. James H„ Elmwood Drive, South Shore, 932-4372, 

353-7440 (Portsmouth, Ohio) 
Williams, Paul W., Hager Hill, 297-4863, 789-4890 
Williams, Roger, 404 Bond Street, Richmond, 623-3126 
Williams, S. Jack, 323 Steele Street. Frankfort, 223-5078, 

564-5586 
Williams, Tom G., 399 Ewing Street, Frankfort, 227-6289. 

227-6653 
Williams, Willie H., 41 3 Elm Street, Lexington, 252-4359, 

252-3212 
Williamson, Fred, 10j9 New Circle, No. 1 33, Lexington, 255- 

4939, 252-5555 
Wilson, Gerald, Normal Hall, No. 19, Morehead 



Wilson, Phillip, Staff/Haw Sea Iron, FPO, San Francisco 
Winchester, Roy L., Bethlehem, 878-4102 (Pleasureville), 

346-8761 (New Castle) 
Winfrey, Shelby, 315 Sharon Drive, Campbellsville, 465- 

8392, 465-5681 
Wingfield, Felix G., 1132 Eastern Parkway, Louisville, 636- 

2282, 636-2282 
Winnecke, John E.. 1502 Brentwood, Owensboro, 684-2604 

684-8804 
Wirtz, Howard A.. 1324 Hollywood Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio 

681-1818, 751-3454 
Wise, Jack, 209 Pocahontas, Georgetown, 863-3948, 863-0772 
Wiseman, David E., 2110 W. Gaulbert, Louisville, 778-7628 
Witten, Clifford, Wurtland Avenue, Wurtland, 836-8806 
Witten, Hershel D., 726 W. Delaware. Sellersburg. Indiana, 

246-2306 
Wolfe, Paul A., 705 Godman, Falmouth, 654-5341 
Wood, James R., Route No. 5, Falmouth, 654-8426, 581-7700 
Wolline, James C, 4805 Pennsylvania Street. South Charles- 
ton, W. Va. 
Woolen, George B.. 96 S. Rosemont, Providence, 667-2932, 

667-2613 
Wright, H. W., Jr., 1434 Hobart Drive, Louisville, 368 2797, 

587-1 1 51, Ext. 416 
Wright, James L., 121 Showalter Drive, Georgetown, 863- 

3628, 233-2000, Ext. 3813 
Wright. John David, 442 McLean Avenue, Hopkinsville, 885- 

9915, 886-3921 
Wulfeck, James, 1 1 1 Burdsall Avenue, Ft. Mitchell, 331-3599 

261-4300 
Yanoff. Jay M., 1935 Gardiner Lane, Louisville, 451 0420, 

454-0477 
Yarbrough, Roy Dean, 163 Lakeshore Drive, Lexington 
Yates, Virgil, 1102 Dogwood Lane, Fulton, 472-3809, 479- 

1441 
Yewell, Morgan R., 475 Flamingo, Frank ott, 875-2745, 

258-291 1, Ext. 327 
Young, James. Box 586, Elkton, 265-2065, 265-2506 
Zachary, David A., Cliffway Drive, Carlisle, 289-2398, 289- 

2274 
Zahner, Denis W., 18 Kessler Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio, 221- 

1706 
Zlamal, Raymond K., 541 Johnson Avenue, Lynch, 848-5966 
Zimmer, Ray M., 3222 Orchard Manor. Louisville, 458-5654, 

636-1381 
Zogg, Joe F., Box 1218, Owensboro, 683-01 52, 683-1298 

Films 

(Continued from Inside Front Cover) 

TUMBLING FOR PHYSICAL FITNESS: COMPAN- 
ION STUNTS, j-s-c-a, 2 reels (20 min.), $1.00 
Seventeen stunts are demonstrated and the importance 

of coordination and timing is emphasized. 

Swimming 

BEGINNING SWIMMING, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $2.00 

Through scenes photographed both above and beneath 
the surface of the water, basic techniques of swimming for 
beginners aie demonstrated. Land and water drills involving 
kicking, breathing, floating, paddling and stroking and pul- 
ling with the arm practiced separately, then coordinated 
as the swimmer learns the American crawl. The back float, 
back stroke, and breast stroke are also illustrated and explained. 
BREAST STROKE, SIDE STROKE AND UNDERWATER 

SWIMMING, e-j-s-c-a, $2.00 

This film presents the conventional breast stroke, timing 
and strokes, and the kick. 
CHAMPIONSHIP SWIMMING: PERFECTING TECHNIQUE, 

e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, ( 19 min.), color, $5.50 

Outlines briefly the program and training methods used 
by the Santa Clara Swim Club that may be used by anyone 
to train swimmers. The techniques illustrated, such as weight, 
training, circle training, pace clocks, bench and stroke work, 
and interval training, when properly applied in the appropri- 
ate circumstances, will all prove beneficial in perfecting 
swimming style. 
CRAWL STROKE, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $2.00 

The basic principles of the stroke are presented in this 
film. The arm stroke, the kick, and the breathing aie 
demonstrated. This film also includes slow motion shots 
underwater. 
DIVING FUNDAMENTALS, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $2.00 

After a brief history of the sport of diving, the following 
points are explained and demonstrated: the hurdle jump, 
determining the correct distance, proper arm action, correct 
way of landing on the feet, proper takeoff and lift, correct 
rntry into the water. The backward dive is also taught, 
including lift, arching the body, and entry into the water. 
The motion is stopped at various points to enable detailed 
study of form. 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER 1969 



In Stock for 
Immediate Delivery 



First-aid Supplies 



The Sport Shop 



old Table 
Tape 



A.B.A. 
Adhesive 
Alcohol 
Am Caps 
Analgestic Linii 
Ankle Brace 
Ankle Weights 
Ankle Wraps 
Aspirin 

Athletic Linime 
Athletic Soap 
Ath-O-Gesic 
Atomic Balm 
Atomic Rub-Do^ 
Band Aid 



It.i 



Hike Tape 

Black Magic 

Body Powder 

Butterfly Tablets 

Carbonate Stick 

Cotton 

Cotton Applicators 

Cramergesic 

Dextrotabs 

Dial-A-Tab 

Dry Smelling Salt 

Elastic Wraps 

Elbow Pads 

Felt 



First 


Aid Kits 


Foam 


Rubber 


Foot 


Ointment 


Foot 


Powder 


Foot 


Solution 


Fung-o-spray 


Gauze 




Glare 


Guard 


Insta 


at Ice 


Iso-Q 


iin 


J & J Cream 


J & 


J Tape 


Kleen 


Ball 


Knee 


Braces 


Knee 


Pads 


Tape 




Tape 


Remover 


Tong 


je Depress 


Towe 


s 


Train 


ing Kits 


Tuf-Skin 



Phone 502 651-5143 



Football Equipment 

Ankle Braces 
Ankle Weights 
Arm Pads 
Bleachers 

Blocking Dummies 
Center Bars 
Chain Sets 
Charging Sled 
Chin Straps 




106-1,10 North Race Street 
Glasgow, Kentucky 42141 



Write for 1 969-70 school catalogue 



DOLPHIN KICK o-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $2.00 

An excellent swimmer, an underwater camera and care- 
fully devised teaching demonstrations introduce the new 
swimming techniques known as the dolphin or fishtail kick. 
Analyzing the body movements 'used in the dolphin kick, 
the film stresses the importance of practice for mastery of 
this efficient speedy kick. 
I'M NO FOOL IN WATER, p-«-j-a, 1 reel (8 min.), color, 

$3.00 

Jimmy Cricket illustrates the "do's" and "don'ts" of 
water safety precautions. Points out the basic rules: wait at 
least two hours after eating, stay out when water is too cold, 
never swim alone, and dive only when you know the water is 
deep enough. 
SWIM AND LlVE,j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $2.00 

Men of the Army Air force at Miami are taught to swim 
from floating to swimming through burning oil. The film 
is useful for pre-induction instruction and for safety classes as 
well as for general programs. 

Tennis 

ADVANCED TENNIS, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $2.00 

While working with a tennis pupil, Bill Tilden narrates 
and demonstrates, showing advanced techniques of tennis. 
BEGINNING TENNIS, e-j-s-c-a, V/i reels (14 min.), $2.50 
Shows how the tennis instructor teaches tennis to 
beginning and advanced students. Includes an analysis of the 
basic fundamentals of tennis-serving, forehand and back- 
hand drive, forehand and backhand volley, and the smash. 
Shows actual play situations in which these fundamentals 
are emphasized, and also includes individual demonstration 
and analysis. 

Track 

THE BROAD JUMP, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $2.00 

Controlled speed-timing and coordination- development 
of legs and torso-mobility of pelvis and hips, one, two, 
three style -footroll- single and triple air stride -soft versus 
hard take off-arm position. 
DISCUS, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $2.00 

Principle of centrifugal force -muscle development for 
side arm throw grips- finger roll-heel of thumb pressure- 
finger exercise clockwise spin-hip snap-reverse and non- 
reverse styles. 
DISTANCE RACES, s-c-a, 1 reel, $2.00 

Races from 1 ,000 to 10,000 meters and steeple chase are 



demonstrated. Style of distance runner is contrasted with 
that of dash man. Difference in typical physiques are shown. 
Slow motion photography is used to analyze movements. 
DISTANCES, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $2.00 

Style-developing stamina-calisthenics- avoid shin splint 
-controlled tension -forward knee reflex- straight line run- 
ning-automatic stride. 
THE HIGH JUMP, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $2.00 

Belly roll or straddle and improved Western style-body 
lean and reverse-approach-body tension-coordination of 
arm and leg action. 
THE HURDLES, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $2.00 

Basic hurdling styles- rear hip and leg action-rhythmic 
running-hurdling, calisthenics, body balance- correct clear- 
ance-circular stepover action-adapting styles of physiques. 
THE JAVELIN, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $2.00 

Four stage catapult throw -preliminary run -concluding 
stride -throwing stance -throwing and reverse-alternative 
hand and fingergrips-facing position- balance of stomach and 
back muscle tension-throwing angle-body and leg coordina- 
tion drills — flexibility exercises. 
JUMPS AND POLE VAULT, s-c-a, 1 reel, $2.00 
Wrestling 

WRESTLING BY THE RULES, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels (18 min.), 

color, $1.00 

Devoted to rules interpretations and officiating procedures. 
A visual approach to the written rules is shown in sixty 
scenes. Guidelines for officiating such area as takedowns 
reversals, stalling, technical violations and illegal holds are 
presented. (KHSAA) 
WRESTLING OFFICIATING ILLUSTRATED, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, 

color, $1.00 

Interpretations given in Wrestling Officiating Illustrated 
have been made by the National Federation members of the 
Joint Rules Committee. The film covers takedowns, reversals, 
escapes, leaving the mat, stalling, scoring and illegal holds 
such as body slam, bar arm, full nelson and chicken wing. 
Guidelines for officiating and interpreting the rules are 
provided. In all there are sixty separate scenes of wrestling. 
This film will provide the much needed guidance and proper 
interpretations for interscholastic competition. 
JIU J1TSU, j-s-c-a, 1 reel (13 min.), $1.00 

Demonstrates the effective, dangerous Jiu Jitsu defenses 
against knife, gun, club and mugging attacks. 
(Continued in December) 



SINCE WE PROVIDE COVERAGE FOR 
ABOUT 50% OF THE SCHOOLS IN THE 
STATE, WE DO HAVE A COMMERCIAL 
INTEREST IN THE ACADEMIC AND 
ATHLETIC PROGRAMS OF ALL OUR 
SCHOOLS. 

BUT OUR REAL INTEREST IS MUCH 
DEEPER, WE ARE VITALLY CONCERN- 
ED THAT GOOD CITIZENSHIP, A SPIRIT 
OF FAIR PLAY, AND A REAL SENSE OF 
PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY BE IN- 
STILLED IN THE YOUTH OF OUR DAY. 

WE BELIEVE THESE ARE THE QUALI- 
TIES THAT HAVE MADE AMERICA 
GREAT, AND ARE THANKFUL FOR 
OUR SCHOOLS AS THEY WORK TO 
CONTINUE THAT GREATNESS. 



^Ihe Kuufden, G&mp&tuf 



GENERAL AGENT 



W. E. KINGSLEY J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. CHARLES C. PRICE 

Life Department 

121-123 LAFAYETTE AVENUE LEXINGTON, KY. 40502 PHONE 254-4095 

P. O. BOX 7100 



51 YEARS 



FOR ATHLETES 

In August, 1918, our founder, Bill Hunt, was asked to help secure some 
uniforms for a football team so they could tell the spectators from the 
players. 

For 5 1 years we at Hunt's have tried to serve the athletes by finding for 
them the best available equipment to serve their needs. 

Today we feature and can supply immediate delivery on merchandise for any 
athletic or physical education need from our warehouse. 

We have complete stock of the following items. 

Football Shoes sizes 1 to 1 4 

Basketball Shoes sizes 1 to 1 7 

Football Pants sizes 22 to 52 

Football Jerseys sizes 4 to 50 

Football Shoulder Pads sizes Little League to 50 

Basketball Jerseys sizes 10 to 50 

Basketball Pants sizes Little League to College 

Athletic Socks sizes 6 to 16 

Football Helmets sizes Boys Extra Small to 8 

Football— Rubber or Leather— Little League to Pro 
Basketballs— Indoor or Outdoor— Biddy to Pro 
Fair Play Scoreboards— Grade School to College 
First Aid for prevention or treatment 

We specialize in your problems. 

Next day delivery to any school in Kentucky. 

Call on our experience and service with your problems. 

In Mayfield, 247-1941 COLLECT. 

One of us can help you. 

C. A. BYRN, JR. -ROY BOYD-JIM MITCHELL-EDDIE THOMIS 

JENNY SIMPSON-ELIZABETH RULE-NANNIE LOU USREY 

SONDRACISSEL-HENRY BOMAR 

DICK STONE-PHIL CARRICO 



HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO., Inc 








High School Athlete 



CLASS AAA STATE CHAMPION ST. XAV1ER 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Tom Roberts, Marty Mooney, John Lewis, Don Looney, Mark Schroer- 
ing, Bob Beck, Bob Andres, Bob Gruner, Bill Helm, Charles Barrett, Bill Marzian, Jack Buehner, Mike 
King, Dane Glass. Second Row: Carl Gammons. Rick Schmitt, Bob Riley, Mike Zoeller, Steve Hagg, 
Stu Eisenback, Mark Webster, Vince Millen. Mike Devine, Tom Overberg, Steve Norris, Henry Allgeier, 
Steve Herfel, Steve Day. Third Row: Mike Glaser, Greg McConnel, Tony King, Joe Williams, Don Har- 
pring, Bob Kennedy, Bert Erny, Dennis Shaw, Greg Gleis, Scott Saylor, Steve Byron, Greg Joyner, John 
Meyer, Fourth Row: Steve Green, Bob Fuchs, Ron Lanham, John Byrnes, Paul Buddeke, Donald 
Dwyer, Gil Wentzel, Ron Steele, Tim Coffey, Bob Vissman, Jim Hovey, Rick Wepler, Roger Cecil, Jack 
Kail. 




St. Xavier 34 
St. Xavier 3 5 
St. Xavier 40 
St. Xavier 46 
St. Xavier 12 



- Thomas Jefferson 6 
Central 

- duPont Manual 13 

- Iroquois 1 2 

- Trinity 6 



St. Xavier 7 - Male 6 

St. Xavier 32 - DeSales 8 

St. Xavier 6 • Bishop David 

St. Xavier 27 - Covington Catholic 

St. Xavier 17 - Flaget 



Playoff 



St. Xavier 15 - Butler 





Official Organ of the 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 



DECEMBER, 1969 




OWENSBORO - CLASS A A CROSS COUNTRY WINNER 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Tony Maddox, Steve Potts, Mike Conkright, Tony Rowe. Second Row: Coach Bob Puckett, 
J. T. Graddick, Richard Stringer, Bruce Kunze, Terry McDaniel, Ass't Coach Ken Willis. 

DESALES - CLASS AAA CROSS COUNTRY CO-CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Mgr. Mike Greenwell, Tom Riley, Jack Sivori, Ron Pontrich, Andy Hartlage, John Kapp, 
Second Row: Charles Medley, Tom Strong, Mike Meehan, Charles Sparks, Mike Malley, Sam Green, Ron Metzler, Third Row: 
William Harry, Kermit Lashley, Coach James Cahill, Leslie Lashley, John Brown, Don Mattingly. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXXII-NO. 5 



DECEMBER, 1969 



$1.00 Per Year 



The Point of Sport 

By Arnold Kaech 
Director, Swiss School of Sport and Gymnastics, Macohn 

EDITOR'S NOTE: The question asked in the title of this pre- 
sentation is frequently put to those engaged in administering 
and directing athletic and sport programs. Thus, the author's 
comment is of particular interest to educators. 

Why do we try , so often and so.hard, to find a justification 
for sport? 

Sport as a means for improving health? As if the agonized 
strain of the runner at the tape, the skier's mad rush past crags 
and trees, or the battered face of the boxer, had anything to 
do with health! 

Sport as a means of forming character and will-power? As 
if character could not be trained better in the "ordinary course 
of life," or will-power tested more searchingly by something 
less absurd than setting up a record! 

Sport as a means for bringing the nations closer together? 
As if the brotherhood of athletes were anything but a pure 
illusion, seen side by side with the howling jingoism of the on- 
lookers, and the jaundiced reports of journalists, for whom 
any winner is a national hero! 

Why should we run after a justification for sport? Why insist 
on making it utilitarian, and give it an end outside itself? Be- 
cause, doubtless, we live in a time that claims "that every un- 
dertaking must be useful, and every man must let himself be 
used ; and because we can neither imagine nor accept the 
idea of sport as self-sufficient, owning no particular aim, and 
finding its true sense and justification precisely in its detach- 
ment from material things. 

We can be glad that sport is good for health; that sport 
can mould character; and that through sport, this or that in- 
dividual has formed lasting bonds of friendship in defiance of 
frontiers and oceans. But if there were no more to it than joy 
in the rhythm of the runner's gait, the jumper's illusion of 
freedom from earthly ties, the helter-skelter down the ski- 
slopes, the sudden cool of a dive, or the passionate, total self- 
absorption in contest-if sport were nothing but aimless, use- 
less play-we should still have no choice but to defend it. 

While we are engaged in sport we move in the blessed 
realm of childhood; while we are engaged in sport the dreams 
of youth are still alive within us. We give freely of ourselves 
because we ask nothing in return; we are disinterested be- 
cause we do not ask if our acts are useful. When we engage in 
sport we are ai play; and it is only at play tnat man is truly 
man, so Schiller has told us. 

To many this play seems an activity of the body merely. 
They see the body in movement, the vigour of a stroke; the 
swing of the gymnast's arms and legs, but they do not see what 
goes on inside. They do not see all-it is as if a man should 
look at a picture and see nothing but lines and colours, or at a 
statue, and think only of the material of which it is made, or 
read a score and never hear the music. The body, and the 
feats it performs, are ends to them; whereas in true sport the 
performance is not an end in itself-nor the body either-but 
the means of expression. Moving over the ground, thrusting 
through the wave, gliding over the snowy slopes, or wrestling 
with the rock-face-these are expressions of the joy of life it- 
self, expressions of the well-being won from living close to na- 
ture. The body is but the means of expression, the instrument 
the soul required to enable it to measure the territory which 
has been granted to man, and occupy it to the limit. 



Only thus can we explain why "they which run in a race 
run all, but one receiveth the prize," only thus understand how 
records can go on forever being broken, at the cost of suffer- 
ing, of sacrifice, and even of the total dedication of life itself, 
Sport is the faithful image of the struggle of humanity towards 
perfection; in sport, soul and body together strive to accom- 
lish the age-old aspiration of mankind- "faster, harder, higher." 

There lies "the point" of sport, its whole importance, its 
true meaning. It needs no other justification. 



The 1969 Cross Country 



The DeSales High School and the Thomas Jefferson High 
School tied for first place in the State Class AAA Cross Coun- 
try Meet, held at Bellarmine College, Louisville, on November 
1. The Owensboro High School team won first place in the 
Class AA event, held on the same date. Ath. Dir. Eddie Weber 
of Bellarmine managed the two meets. 

John Rodgers of Thomas Jefferson was individual champ- 
ion in Class AAA, Mark Bruins of Bryan Station in Class A A 

Team scores in Class AAA were as follows: DeSales, 47; 
Thomas Jefferson, 47; Trinity, 140; Westport, 142; Male, 
191; Bishop David, 219; Butler, 261; Fairdale, 286; Flaget, 
337. 

The order in which the first twenty-five runners finished 
is given below, including the times of the first ten. 

1-John Rodgers, ThomasJefferson(10.11.7): 2-Andy Hart- 
lage, DeSales (10.12); 3-Glen Haley, Thomas Jefferson (10. 
16); 4-Louis Riley, Atherton (10.20); 5-Tom Strong, DeSales 
(10.21); 6-Ron Pontrich, DeSales (10.22); 7-Brian Lively, 
Thomas Jefferson (10.27); 8-Riuhard Wrenn, Atherton (10. 
29); 9-Bryan Howell, Seneca (10.32); 10-Don Cook, Seneca 
(10.33); 11-Ollie Thibodeaus, St. Xavier; 12-Steve Walls, 
Iroquois; 13-Mitchell Greenburg, Westport; 14-Jack Sivori, 
DeSales; 15-Tom Goiter, Thomas Jefferson; 16-Danny Barth, 
Trinity; 17-Bmce Zoeller, Bishop David; 18-Gary Luttrell, 
Pleasure Ridge Park; 19-Wulie White, Shawnee; 20-John Kapp, 
DeSales; 21-Terry Hansell, Thomas Jefferson; 22-Tyree Wil- 
burn, Atherton; 23-Bryan Welch, Eastern; 24-Larry Bailey, 
Butler; 25-Dave Brice, Trinity. 

Team scores in Class AA were as follows: Owensboro, 96; 
Covington Catholic, 135; Tates Creek, 158; Daviess County, 
164; Somerset, 200; Covington Holmes, 270; Taylor County, 
296; Adair County, 298; Lafayette, 365; Bryan Station, 368; 
Jenkins, 420; Shelby County, 448; Christian County, 454; 
Bath County, 463; Elizabethtown, 469; Meade County, 474; 
Trigg County, 565. 

The order in which the first twenty-five runners finished 
is given below, including the times of the first ten. 

1-Mark Bruins, Bryan Station (10.07.9); 2-Stu McHie, 
Ashland (10.10); 3-Jerry Young, Somerset (10.13); 4-Larry 
Pusey, Fort Knox (10.1 6) ;5-Maxie Hadley, Adair County (10. 
18); 6-Curtis Harris, Wayne County (10.19); 7-Charles Daw- 
son, Danville (10.20); 8-Mike Shields, St. Mary (10.23); 9- 
Curtis Davidson, Daviess County (10.24); 10-Steve Daffron, 
Monticello (10.27); 11-J. T. Graddick, Owensboro; 12-Paul 
Gregory, Covington Catholic; 13-Ricky Hill, Bardstown; 14- 
Steve Potts, Owensboro; 15-RkkWhaley,Tates Creek; 16-Mike 
Conkwright, Owensboro; 17-Bob Fleming, Tates Creek; 18- 
Charles Dieruf, Frankfort; 19-Tony Maddox, Owensboro; 20- 
Gene Sageser, Tates Creek; 2 1-Gary Whitfield, Covington Cath- 
olic; 22-Edgar McNahon, Taylor County; 23-Ray Buescher, 
Covington Catholic, 24-Gene Meyer, Owensboro Catholic; 
25-Brandt Niehaus, Daviess County. 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1969 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 40501 

Second class postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Ralph C. Dorsey (1966-70), Horse Cave 

Vice-President . . . Foster J. Sanders ( 1966-70), Louisville 
Directors-Morton Combs(1968-72),Cair Creek; W. H. Crow- 
dus (1968-71), Franklin; Don Davis (1967-71), Independ- 
ence; James T. Dotson (1968-72), Pikeville, Lee T. Mills 
(1969-73), Frankfort; Richard Vincent (1969-73), Morgan- 
field. 

Subscription Rate $1.00 per Year 

Jt\om the Commission?* s Office 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1969 Football Participation List 

2. School's Report on Football Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Football) 



Delegate Assembly Members 

Members of the Delegate Assembly at the forthcoming 
1970 annual meeting of the Association were elected by the 
principals of K.H.S.A.A. member schools on ballots returned 
to the State Office before November 15. There were several 
ties in the voting for delegate and alternate. These ties were 
broken recently, with the delegates and alternates determined 
by lot. The names of the district representatives are as follows: 

Delegates 

(1) Bobby Snider, (2) Glenn E. Dexter, (3) Cecil Reid, 
(4) Eli Alexander, (5) Arnold S. Oaken, (6) T. Wendell John- 
son, (7) David Siria, (8) Andrew Renick, (9) Henry O'Bryan, 
(10) Perry Hill, (11) Scott Willoughby, (12) Bill Lee, (13) 
Roy D. Reynolds, (14) Don Stephenson, (15) Eldon Smith, 
(16) Jerome D. Taylor, (17) Bob Burrow, (18) Tom Hunt, 
(19) T. G. Florence, (2p) George Critz, (21) J. W. Hackett, 
(22) John Brown, (23) John Pittenger, (24) T. T. Knight, 
(25) Bro. Conrad Callahan, (26) Rev. David Hazelip, (27) 
John Reschai, (28) A. K. Diaut, (29) L. W. Mullins, (30) 
Woodv Barwick. (31) James B. Edwards, (32) Carl Collins, 
(33) Billy E. Prewitt, (34) Mote Hils, (35) William Armstrong, 
(36) Ken Shields, (37) Donald G. Elder, (38) Terry Cummins, 
(39) Robert L. Hellard, (40) Tom Goebel, (4 1) O. C. Leathers, 
(42) Zeb Blankenship, (43) Dwight Price, (44) Elwood Daugh- 
erty, (45) David Cottrell, (46) Eldon Davidson, (47) James 
Williams. (48) Roy Bowling, (49) Henry Garrison, (50) Louie 
Martin, (51) James A. Pursifull, (52) George Francis, (53) J. 
M. Burkrich, (54) John Stringer," (55) R. B. Singleton, (56) 
Ernie Woods, (57) Harlan Hopkins, (58) Pete Grigsby, Jr., 
(59) W. F". Doane, (60) James V. Powell, (61) Hiram C. Wal- 
ters, (62) Andrew J. Fultz, (63) Frank V. Firestine, (64) Webb 
Young. 

Alternates 

(1) Larry Shanks, (2) Bob Buchanan, (3) W. W. Chumbler, 
(4) Vernon E. Shown, (5) Fred Clayton, (6) Hugh Sellers, (7) 
Floyd Brown, (8) Bill R. Perry, (9) L. L. McGinnis, (10) Del- 
mas Gish, (11) Richard O. Bernard, (12) Cecil Goff, (13) Tom 
Garrett, (14) James A. Carpenter, (15) Tommy Downing, (16) 
Larry McDonald, (17) Paul E. Kerrick, (18) E. E. Tate, (19) 
John H. Branson, (20) Obie Coomer, (21) David Birnett, (22) 
Bobby Green, (23) Harry Hardin, (24) W. D. Bruce, (25) Bro. 
Gregory Galligan, (26) Bob Hublar, (27) William T. Reynolds, 
(28) James O. Gatewood, (29) Roger A. Phelps, (30) Berry 
Peniston, (31) Jim Wilson, (32) Cyrus E. Greene, <33) C. R. 



Norman, (34) Tom Ellis, (35) John Gross, (36) Ken Lehkamp, 
(37) Bob Anderson. (38) W. H. Hanson. (39) Elza Whalen Jr.. 
(40) Doug Oliver, (41) Robert W. Hoagland, (42) Kenneth 
King, (43) Jack Issacs, (44) John H. Brock, (45) James Mc- 
Afee, (46) Joe W. Harper, (47) Collas Simpson, (48) William 
Schott, (49) Bruce Morris, (50) Clyde Hill, (51) C. E. Cal- 
loway, (52) Kenneth Condra, (53) Darrell Bell, (54) Albert 
Combs, (55) James E. Moore, (56) Granville Deaton, (57) 
Buckey Ellis, (58) James F. Francis, (59) Winston Adkins, 
(60) Mack D. Slone, (61) Joe Blankenship, (62) William N. 
Collins, (63) Charles Banks, (64) Clyde Hunsaker. 



Minutes of Meeting 

K.H.S.A.A. Wrestling Committee 

Lexington, Kentucky, October 25, 1969 

The K.H.S.A.A. Wrestling Committee, meeting in the As- 
sociation office on October 25, 1969, was called to order at 
9:30 A.M. by Chairman Orville Williams. The reading of the 
minutes of the previous meeting was waived since the min- 
utes had appeared in the ATHLETE. 

With respect to old business, the following points were 
made: (A) Riding time will remain as it has been, for the cur- 
rent season (Michigan riding time). (B) Weight certification 
may be made at any time, starting December 1. If a wrestler 
is not certified in December, he must certify at base weight 
for his first meet after January 1. Only after certification is he 
entitled to the normal weight allowance: 2 lbs. in January, 
1 lb. in February, and one additional pound for each day af- 
ter the first day of tournament participation. (C) Heavy- 
weight class will be unlimited. (D) The four Regions will re- 
main the same with the exception of the addition of new 
teams. The Region Chairmen are: Fort Campbell-Marshall Pat- 
terson, Fort Campbell High School; West Jefferson County- 
Vince Semary, Male High School; East Jefferson County-Bob 
Weenolsen, Westport High School; Lexington Bryan Station- 
Brother Joseph, Newport Catholic High School and Jerry Ab- 
ney, Campbell County High School. (E) Wrestle-backs are the 
option of the Region Chairman, but are required in the State 
Tournament. 

Under new business, it was announced that the State 
Tournament will be at the Waggener High School. Three re- 
ferees will be used. Coaches are asked to submit suggestions. 
The drawing will be the same as last year. 

Tests to register referees for the 1969-70 season are avail- 
able. They may be secured from Mr. Theo. Sanford by writing 
to the K.H.S.A.A. office. 

Under the topic of rules and changes the following should 
be noted: (1) Weight classes have been changed. (2) Headgear 
is mandatory. (3) The out-of-bounds rule is simplified. (4) 
More stalling is to be called. (5) Release of disadvantaged 
wrestler by advantaged wrestler in order to give up one point 
and gain two points by repeated takedowns. The first time the 
advantaged wrestler will be warned for stalling. The next time 
he will cause a penalty point to be awarded. In conjunction 
with this the following quote should be noted from the OF- 
FICIAL WRESTLING GUIDE on page 25: "The contestants 
in the advantage position on the mat shall make an honest 
attempt to wrestle aggressively, maintain control and attempt 
to secure a fall." Also note page 24, section 9 beginning: 
"It is the responsibility of contestants, officials and coaches 
to avoid the use of stalling tactics or allowing the use there- 
of " 

Three rules interpretation and clinics were scheduled for 
Lexington, Bowling Green, and Louisville. Mr. Williams would 
head these aided by Mr. Will Evans of K.S.B. and Mr. Weenol- 
son of Westport. 

Qualifications for Region seeding will follow the seeding 
formula of 8-5-4-4-2. A contestant must have wrestled a min- 
imum of 8 matches; 5 of these must be between different op- 
ponents; 4 of the 8 must be wrestled in his region; 4 of the 8 
must be with different opponents in his certified weight class; 
and 2 of these 4 must be with opponents in his region and at 
his certified weight class. Certification forms will be mailed 
out by the State Office. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1969 



Page Three 



To obtain the film of last year's State Tournament, coaches 
are requested to write to the film library at the University of 
Kentucky. 

The meeting adjourned at 11:30 A.M. 

Robert Weenolsen, Recording Secretary 



Wrestling Regions 

The principals of forty-six K.H.S.A.A. member schools 
have indicated that their schools are sponsoring Wrestling 
teams during the current school year. The assignment of these 
schools by regions are as follows: 

Fort Campbell Region- Bowling Green, Caldwell County, 
Christian County, Fort Campbell, Franklin-Simpson, Hopkin- 
sville, Madisonville-North Hopkins, Nelson County, North Har- 
din, Trigg County. 

West Jefferson Regjon-Ahrens Trade, Flaget, Kentucky 
School for the Blind, Louisville Country Day, Pleasure Ridge 
Park, St. Xavier, Trinity, Valley, Waggener, Western 

East Jefferson Region-Ballard, Durrett, Eastern, Fern 
Creek, Henry County, Jeffersontown, Marion C. Moore, Old- 
ham County, Seneca, Westport 

Lexington Region-Boone County, Bryan Station, Camp- 
bell County, Danville, Frankfort, Franklin County, Harrison 
County, Henry Clay, Johns Creek, Lafayette, Millersburg 
Military Institute, Morgan County, Newport, Newport Cath- 
olic, Tates Creek, Woodford County 



Minutes of Meeting 
K.H.SAA. Gymnastics Committee 
Lexington, Ky. October 29, 1 969 

The meeting, held at the K.H.S.A.A. Building, was called 
to order at 7:30 p.m. by the Committee Chairman, Bernard 
M. Johnson. 

The following members were present: Ted Sanford, Joe 
Billy Mansfield, Bill Wise, Bob Wason, Sheila Kuhlman, Susan 
Burckle, Jim Nance, Bernard Johnson and guest Cap CaudilL 

Mr. Sanford opened the meeting by announcing that there 
had been an increase in the number of high schools that listed 
Gymnastics coaches for the 1969-70 school year. There were 
nineteen (19) boys' and twenty-one (21). girls' coaches re- 
gistered with the K.H.S.A.A. 

Bob Wason stated that the Louisville area had recently 
completed two judging clinics. Jim Nance announced the dates 
of three (3) clinics for boys' coaches £nd judges to be con- 
ducted in the Lexington area. The clinics scheduled: Novem- 
ber 5th at Alumni Gym (Free Exercise & Long Horse Vaults), 
November 12th at Lafayett (Side Horse-"P" Bars), and Nov- 
ember 19th at Bryan Station ("H" Bar-Still Rings). Cap Cau- 
dill volunteered to conduct a gymnastics clinic for girls' 
coaches and judges on November 15th at Southern Jr. High 
School 

The question was raised concerning the status of high 
school students who compete on teams other that their high 
school team and compete for their high school in the State 
Meet. Mr. Sanford clarified the question by reading By-Law 8, 
(Contestants on Other Teams) from the K.H.S.A.A. Constit- 
ution, By-Law and Tournament Rules. By-Law 8-" Any person 
who is a contestant on any other team than a secondary school 
team at any time during an athletic season shall be ineligible 
to represent any secondary school in that sport for the re- 
mainder of that season. The provision of this section shall 
not apply to members of baseball, swimming, golf, tennis, 
gymnastics, wrestling and rifle marksmanship teams." 

The committee discussed scoring procedures for gym- 
nastics. It was pointed out that there has been a number of 
changes in the scoring system for gymnastics during the past 
year. However, due to the present rules of the K.H.S.A.A. and 
the State Gymnastics Committee the scoring system could not 
be changed for this years State Gymnastics Meet. It was sug- 
gested that a committee study the present rules and revise the 
rules in time for the 1971 Stite Gymnastics Meet. 



Sheila Kuhlman and Susan Burckle were asked to make 
any necessary changes concerning the 1970 State Girls' Gym- 
nastics Meet and send them to Mr. Sanford. 

The Committee voted to have the State Gymnastics Meet 
at Bryan Station High School on March 28, 1970. Jim Nance 
was appointed meet manager. 

There being no further business, the meeting was ad- 
journed - Committee Chairman, Bernard M. Johnson. 



Wrestling Officials 

As reported previously, for the first time officials are be- 
ing registered in the sport of Wrestling. Registration is not yet 
a requirement for those who officiate in the sport, but officials 
who^lan to register in the future and to work for the advanced 
ratings would do well to start their first registration during the 
current school year. Inquiries should be directed to the K.H. 
S.A.A. office. 

Officials registered to date are: 

Bruce, William H., 459 Huguelet Dr., Lexington, 252-9446 
Clarke, Wayne J., 218 Glass Avenue, Frankfort, 223-8371 

227-6611 
Easley, Dan W., 1 07 Morrison, WUmore 
Fay, John C, 319 C Street, Price Road, Lexington, 233-1982, 

258-9000, Ext. 2517 
Halcomb, Ted, 2702 B. Riedling Avenue, Louisville, 897- 

3747, 585-2201 
Ingraham, Gary J., 9706 Lanesboro Way, Louisville 
Schneider, Dennis W., Kirwan Towers, Box 301, Un. of Ky., 

Lexington, 258-9000, Ext. 8-6731 
Warren, Lawrence A., Route 3, Box 83F, Corydon, Indiana, 

812-738-2167, 812-738-2166 
Weenolsen, Robert O., 4332 South 3rd Street, Louisville 
366-82TJ0, 425-2541 



Basketball Case Book Corrections 



Play 21, Page 10: Place period after "space" in 3rd line. 
Delete remainder of 3rd line and entire 4th line. Deleted ma- 
terial redundant. It is covered in 1st line. 

Play 22, Page 11: At end of 7th line delete "about;" De- 
letion makes ruling specific. 

Play 23, Page 11: Comment: Word "may" in 2nd line of 
ruling is appropriate. Penalty for violation is conditional de- 
pending upon whether free throw attempt is made. 

Play 103, Page 14: Line 23, First word should be "illegal." 

Play 2071, Page 30: Printer's error, Delete 5th and- 6th 
Lines. Correct ruling in entirety is Travelling. 

Play 207M, Page 31: Printer's error. Delete entire lines 3 
and 4 

Play 400F, Page 58: Insert the following after last word 
(which is "end") "of the free throw line extended"' 

Play 405B, Page 65: Correct ruling is No Violation. (Com- 
ment: Team A may recover because of touching by B.) 

Play 407H, Page 73: Period in 2nd line after "extended." 
Delete remainder of ruling. 

Play 408E, Page 79: Ruling revised because of visual coup* 

Ruling: When the official determines (or recognizes) that 

there is lack of action he shall begin his 10 seconds count and 

indicate the count with a chopping-hand motion and the etc. 

. . as in printed copy. 

Play 41 IP, Page 93: Replace "flagrant" with "intentional." 

RULES BOOK, Rule 2, Section 5, Pg. 9: Insert next to last 
line, following "seconds,"andindicating the count with a chop- 
ping hand motion" to administer rules 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER. 1969 



PAINTSVILLE - CLASS A, REGION 4, DISTRICT 2, CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Mark Grim, Greg VanHoose, Mike Stafford, David Heil, Tom Newman, John Kedd, Jonn Ball, 
Mitch Kinner, Tom Justice, David Mitchell, Don Castle. Second Row: Fritz Walchick, Jerry Swain, Mike Lauffer, Larry Eld- 
ridge, Charles Hernandez, Jim Thomas, P. R. Delong, Rick Stafford, Mike Wiley, Keith Morris. Third Row: Mgr. Ronnie 
Fairchild, Mgr. Mike Fairchild, Mgr. R. J. Williams, Mgr. Larry Fairchild, Danny Fannin, Earl Castle, Mike Baldwin, Keith 
Wells, Rick Preston, Ben Cox, Jim Gullett. Greg Burke, Gary Eldridge, J. R. Conley. Fourth Row: Bill Cox, John Chandler, 
John Lemaster, Roger Grim, Larry Robinson, Charles Williams, KarrOell Taylor, Jim Sam Williams, Gary Castle. Mike Crot- 
hers. 

RUSSELL VILLE - CLASS A, REGION 1 , DISTRICT 1 , CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Joe Fuqua, Mike Gough, John Morgan, Garfield Arnold, Ronnie Matar, Jimmy Morrow, 
William Hill, Charlie Griffith. Ronnie Kees, Ronnie Bell, Bob Flowers. Second Row: Ricky Cagle, Carl Grinter, Bobby Kees. 
Steve Hindman, Dennis Nuyt, Tom Riffle, Billy Jayne, William Todd, Andy Guion, Ricky Matar, Mark Sasson, Tony Stokes, 
Virgil Benton, Billy Costello. Third Row: Scott Neil, Chet Ward, Donald Bell, Randy Cowan, Kenneth Utley, Charles Dun- 
can, Tom Threlkeld, Bob Tattitch, Barry Parrish, Larry Duffey, Ralph Parrish, Jim Trice, Jeff Maxwell, Tim Gilliam, Don 
Averitt, John Paul Hughes, Marc Sanford. 

WOODFORD COUNTY - CLASS AA, REGION 2, DISTRICT 2, CHAMPION 








(Left to Right) Front Row: Mgr. Tom Sturgeon, Ray Goodrich, Duncan Baker, Bob Higgins, Steve Hogg, Tim Middleton, 
Mark Wallace, Johnny Snowden, Mike Jefferson, Chuck Sauer, Greg Rice, Rick Nutter, Mike Blackburn, Bill Mullins, Biff 
Baker, Johnny Semones, Sammy Fisher, Jerry Fitch, Barry Rice, Mgr. Eddie Blades. Second Row: Coach Bowers, Coach 
Withers, Gary Jones, David Brown, Tom Mullins, Bryan Kir by, Ricky LeMaster, Doug Arnold, Bill Barrows, Larry Weathers, 
Denny Nunnelly, Tom Stratton, Larry Sallee, David Hartley, Pete Cline, Clark Midkiff, Frank Gains, John Kittenger, Dan 
Tilghman, Hartley Wilson, Joe Short, Roscoe Bottoms, Tom F.wing, Carl Whalen, Coach Hansen, Coach Hager. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1969 



Page Five 



CORBIN - CLASS AA, REGION. 4, CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: D. Brewer, G. Harrison, J. Gibbs, J. Leigh, C. Dizney, B. Darr, A. Taylor, B. Hammons, B. 
Lankster, J. Litteral, G. Bennett, S. Williamson, H. Thompson. Second Row: B. Daniel, T. Dudley, D. Karr, R. Hoffman, P. 
Henson, C. Burgan, P. Booth, G. Durham, D. Goins, J. Bennett, B. Carpenter, Third Row: R. Wilson, M. Sears, D. Hamlin, 
T. Cobb, L. EUiot, D. Ashley, O. Hill, R. Hudson, Powell, M. Cima, T. Smith, K. Hudson, R. Hart. Fourth Row: 3. Hoskins 
M. Massey, G. McDaniel, V. Hoover, D. Meadows, B. Short, G. Cima, G. Lewis, J. Martin, E. Burgan, D. Meyers, M. Driggers, 
E. Bowling, L. Walters, D. Darr. 

LYNCH - CLASS A, REGION 4, DISTRICT 1, CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Ass't Coach Enoch 1 Foutch, Ass't Coach John Morgan, Asst Coach Joe Bill Clark, David 
Elliott, Kenny Vicini, Dennis Clark, Millard Caldwell, Charles Russell, Mike Price, Danny Powell, Randy Adams, Darryl 
Washington, Thomas Roscoe, Gary Dye, David Sizemore, Ass't Coach Charles Sellars., Coach Ed Miracle. Second Row: Mgr. 
Rodney Hammond, Lynn Monhollen, Jesse Mackey, Jerry Burnette, Curtis Stewart, Reginald Stephens, Paul Creech, Gary 
Standridge, Tom Sheback, Marc Merritt, Johnny Owens, Henry Rodgers, Ass't Coach Gary Hackler. Third Row: Stewart 
Steele, Frank Sizemore, Steven Sorke, James Creech, Johnny Reasor, Mark Moran, Dan Koier, John Self, Ralph Price, Jeff 
Koier, David Hollin, Earl Bandy, Tim Lee, Mgr. Chris Jackson. 

TOMPKINSVILLE - CLASS A, REGION 1, CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: John C. Hamilton, Marshall Whitlow, Ronnie Davis, Harold Carter, Tommy McClendon, 
Freddie Moody, Gordon McAlpine, Greg Proffitt, Bobby Bushong, Leroy Tooley, Second Row: Ricky Ross, Steve Butler, 
Ricky Miller, Sammy Graves, Steve Hurt, Rodney Dickerson, Gary Spears, Paul Evans, Paul Bushong. Third Row: Max An- 
derson, Johnny Bushong, Elois Grooms, David Stephens, John D. Hamilton, Bobby Hamilton, George E. Miller, Mike Thomp- 
son, Ass't Coach Bill McClendon. Coach Frank Petett. 






Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1969 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(list Compiled November 21) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it 
is the home phone unless otherwise designated. If two numbers 
are given, the first number is that of the home phone, 
Ackermann, Joe F., 2904 Noe Court, Louisville, 459-4256, 

454-0431 
Acree, Aaron, 1723 E. 7th Street, Hopkinsville, 886-6818, 

886-3921 
Adair, Lewis C, 5307 Lost Trail, Louisville, 361-2775, 363- 

9440 
Adams, Ray, Jr., Route f-j 3, Box 107, Manchester, 598-3487, 

598-3561 
Adams, Richard Wayne, 218 Waddill Avenue, Madisonville, 

821-1381, 821 5246 
Adams, Samuel A., Ill, 313 Mechanic Street, Hopkinsville, 

886-7044, 886-3921 
Anderson, John E., Route j-f 5, Clarksville, Tennessee, 647- 

0452, 798-6223 
Anderson, Tom, Route fj 2, Green Meadows, Somerset, 679- 

2161, 678-81 1 1, Ext. 146 
Armstrong, Henry, Route 7, Murray, 435-4531 
Atwell, Darryl, Route {j 1, Hardyville, 528-2364, 528-2271 
Ballenger, L. E., R. R. 1, Hanover, Indiana, 866-3651, 866- 

2145 
Beauchamp, Patsy J., 602 Nutwood Avenue, Bowling Green, 

843-3829 
Begley, Donnie Jack, Berea College, Box 120, Berea, 398- 

7326 
Bollinger, Billy J., Route /-/ 4, Owensboro, 764-1019 
Boyles, Paul E., 809 Bellefonte Road, Flatwoods, 836-5497, 

836-9332 
Brame, Robert, Route 5, Cadiz, 522-8033, 886-3921 
Breeden, Donald B., Route ff 6, Benton, Paducah 898-3964, 

Calvert City 395-4400 
Bruce, Ronald K., General Delivery, White Plains, 676-3586 
Bruner, Jack C, Route f-j 5, Box 93, London, 864-4322, 864- 

2701 
Brush, Thomas L., Jenkins, 832-2832, 832-2180 
Buis. Nathaniel, Liberty, 787-6714, 787-6151 
Burchett, Ernest, David, 874-2117 
Burton, Billy J., 401 Barbour Street, Providence, 667-2296, 

667-24U 
Butler, Elvis H.. 212 Talbert Drive, Hopkinsville, 886-4697, 

886-3921 
Camplin, Harold William, St. Charles, 669-4279 
Caple, Harold, 608 Church Street, Ludlow, 261-5384 
Carr. Gene P., 2210 Phelps Street, Ashland, 324-7548 
Carr, Lawrence W., 323 Shelby Street, Bromley, 261-2994, 

243-3796 
Carrico, Phillip L., General Delivery, Fancy Farm, 623-8270, 

247-1941 
Chaffins, Grable, Garrett, 358-4306 
Clark, Kenneth, Hartford, 298-3293 
Claypool, Thomas W., Route 2, Owensboro, 684-8719, 

684-5285 
Cloud, Ralph L., Box 535, Harlan 

Coker, Allen, P. O. Box 410, Bowling Green, 74 5-5684 
Conatser, Roger, Whitley City, 376-5327, 367-5338 
Conley, Ted L., 4725 Nottingham Ct., Ashland, 325-3232, 

324-6343 
Corlis, John H., Box 114, Brooksvilla. 75 3-2421 
Cornelison, Walter, Box 103, Bybee, 369-5631, 369-5350 
Cunningham, Jack D., P. O. Box 111, Majestic 
Curtis, Robert, 2106 Bonny Castle Avenue, Louisville, 367, 

6582,361-1371 



Davis, Tom, RFD W 2, Central City, 754-31 86, 476-841 1 
3352 



Day, Perry Curt, 



Box 64, Millersburg, 848-2116, 848- 



Day, Richard William, 1677 Linstead, Lexington, 277-8231 
Delaney, William T., 17 West Ridge, Newport, 431-4410, 421- 

9020 
Dening, David, 1017 West Lexington Avenue, Winchester, 

744-8162, 744-2832 
Denton, William D., 14 Clore Court, Henderson, 827-3409, 

826-3733 
Dillihay, Ralph Elbert, Box 7, Drakesboro, 476-8231 
Doppler, Ronald D., 3402 Anaconda Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

661-0541 
Dougherty, Michael, 2621 So. Virginia, Hopkinsville, 886- 

7574, 886-3921 



Douthwaite, Donald D., 6616 Merwin Avenue, Cincinnati, 

Ohio, 661-0915, 662-0891 
Draughn, Hubert H., P. O. Box 35, Garrett, 358-4177 
Easterling, William R., Box 174, Rockhouse, 754-5409 
Eldridge, Wayne R., P. O. Box 144, Science Hill, 423-3495, 

678-8161 
Fowler, Ronald S., 204 East Fifth Street, Maysville, 564- 

6351, 564-5283 
Frazer, D. J., 420 E. Virginia Street, Evansville, Indiana, 425- 

6979, 425-2411 
Freeman, Roy Leon, 2422 Negley Place, Evansville, Indiana, 

423-1248 
Friedly, Gary, 101 Montgomery Avenue, Georgetown, 863- 

2843, 233-2000, Ext. 2190 
Fritz, Robert G., 626 Jimwood Drive, Vine Grove, 877-5688 
Fuller, John B., 420 Queensway Drive, Lexington, 266-7075 
Gamble, Gerald E., 232 Helm Street, Elizabethtown, 769- 

1212 
Gardner, Howard E., 829 McCullum, Elizabethtown, 765- 

6273, 765-6273 
Gentry, Jack, Faulkner Hotel, Barbourville 
Gibson, Eddie, Box 96, Pippa Passes 

Gifford, Clarence Charles, 868 Tomahawk Trail, Lexington, 

277-1605, 255-1461 
Gillespie, Fred, 638 Hickory Street, Calvert City, 395-4776 
Glass, Larry Allen, 258 Brockton. Richmond 
Greer, James T., Route 1, Almo, 753-1236 
Grubbs, John A., 7905 Dixie Highway, Florence, 371-8579, 

331-4621 
Hargis, Noel Keith, Route 1, Science Hill, 42 3-3456, 678- 

5151 
Hale, Robert Vernon, 2405 Glenmary, Apt. 4, Louisville, 451- 

4878 
Hamby, Thomas, 201 Gateway, Hopkinsville, 885-9980, 886- 

3921 
Hardin, William E., Mackville Hill, Springfield, 336-7128 
Harper, Robert A., Route 4, Cadiz, 522-6546, 886-3921 
Harrison, Mark, Route 7, Box 279, Hopkinsville, 269-2216, 

886-3921 
Hayes, Haskew, Jr., Box 407, Jenkins, 832-4489, 832-2184 
Henderson, Charles, 316 Andrew Drive, Hopkinsville, 885- 

5771, 886-3921 
Henderson, Donald, 3030 Chippewa Drive, Hopkinsville, 886- 

3921 (Bus.) 
Hickey, Charles Melvin, 6055 Taylor Mill, Covington, 356- 

2380 
Hill, Wallace, 614 Pearl Street, Bowling Green, 842-4558 
Hills, Marshall L., Box 433, Morning View, 356-9687 
Hilton, Billy, 323 Maplewood Avenue, Springfield, 336-7594 
Hines, Bob, 621 Hemlock, Calvert City, 395-7240, 395-4181 
Hoffer, Lester Alan, Route 1, Crofton 
Howard, Orville R., Route 4, Hodgenville, 358-4773, 358- 

3195 
Hudson, Miles F., 407B Stryker Village, Ft. Campbell, 798- 

2747, 798-5587 
Huffman, Stephen M., Box 202, Pikeville, 437-4711, 754- 

7981 
Hughes, Rufus L., Route 1, Whitley City, 376-2979, 376-9398 
Hutchens, Jim, Box 243, Belfry, 237-1204, 353-7362 
Hyatt, Robert L.. Jr.. Linden Drive, Lawrenceburg, 839-4436 
Joiner, Bruce, 1000 Central Avenue, Hopkinsville, 886-1471 
Jones, Dexter Keith, Route 7, Hopkinsville, 269-2275, 886- 

3921 
Jordan, Raymond A., 1006 Sunset Terrace, Milton, West Vir- 
ginia 
Jordan, Robert V., Route 1, Lafayette, 271-2221, 886-3921 
Joseph, Roger, Route 2, Kirksey, 489-3281 
Judy, Michael Lee, 110 Beechwood Avenue, Frankfort, 227- 

6711 
Keatley, James H., Route 2, Delbarton, West Virginia 
Kemplin, Frank, 8 Maysville Avenue, Mt. Sterling, 498-1090 
Kidwell, James S., 1 1 12 Parkway, Covington, 291-6856 
Kitchen, Leslie, 1701 Lindy Lane, Lexington, 255-6062, 299- 

4381 
Klusman, Carl J., Jr., 2521 Meadow Drive, Louisville, 454- 

0232, 634-1511, Ext. 392 
Konrad, Gary, 1015 College Courts, Murray, 762-2458 

Lacer, Wayne, 3003 Palmer Circle, Henderson, 827-1407 
Lambert, Irvin G., 5110 Rural Way, Louisville, 969-4718, 

582-5504 
Latkovski, Anastasius, 1235 Logan Street, Louisville, 635- 

6720, 587-1323 
Lawrence, Ernest E., 826 Parkway Drive, Louisville 
Lee, James Edward, P. O. Box 285, Van Lear, 789-3954 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1969 



Page Seven 



MADISONVILLE - CLASS AA, REGION 2, DISTRICT 1, CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Fox, Vaughn, Riddle, Offutt, McCormick, Leavelle, Traylor, Crabtree, Kelly, Cook. Second 
Row: Trover, Gates, Leasure, Joines, Sandige, Breshear, Davis, Soder, Powell, Jones, Jernigan, Vandiver. Third Row: Frank- 
lin, Kolody, Drone, McNeil, Hand, Zirko, Porter, Siria, Bourland, Josleyn, Riddle, McNeil, B. Collins, Renfro, McCalister. 
Fourth Row: Gray, Wadlington, A. Collins, Stevens, Renfro, Starr, Gatlin, Dozier, Moore, Craft, Robards, Martin. 



DAYTON - CLASS A, REGION 3, DISTRICT 1 , CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Trainer David lies, Mgr. Pete Casterline, Mgr. Craig Worthington, Mgr. Doug Campbell, Mgr. 
Steve Graves, Mgr. Greg Turner. Second Row: Ath. Dir. George Houston, Ass't Coach Terry Lightfoot, Mike Ackerson, Rick 
Buchanan, Chuck Lightfoot, Bob Eddy, Orville Hundemer, Bill Huff, Rick Lightfoot, Bob Fitch, Mike Cain. Third Row: 
Ass't Coach Jack Keller, Ass't Coach Tom Hood, Sam Wilburn, Pat Doyen, Ken Schaub, Clarence White, Jesse Frank, Mark 
Myers, Bob Fleisc hman , Ass't Coach Stan Steidel, Ass't Coach Jim Gracey. Fourth Row: Mike Berkemeier, Larry Lightfoot 
Mike Love, AITen wiuiams, Tom Fowee, Rodney Gibbons, Ron Farris, Cameraman Frank Lyons. Coach Ray King. Fifth 
Row: Joe Frank, Carroll Wescott. Clark Myers, Murrell Heaton, Dan Thacker, Steve Fryman, Dave Fox, Joe Fowee. Sixth 
Row: Dell Brickler, Gary Leger, Dana Doud,i Mike Gallagher, Ernie Schweinzger, Mike Bush, Don Jacobs, Mike Turner. 
Seventh Row: Bob Schacherer, Steve Carnes, Joe Justice, Dale Thompson, Chester Campbell, Frank Staton, Joe Walton, 
Clinton Harrison. 



LeQuire, Harold M., Woodland Hills, Harlan, 573-1857, 573- 

5151 
Lewis, Tommy, 221 Michigan Avenue, Whitesburg, 633-2336 
Louden, Hubert C, Box 75, Sulphur, 743-5297, Louisville, 

584-4141 
Lyle, Robert L., 1201 College Court, Murray, 762-2748 
McBride, W. Kenneth, 157 St. William Drive, Lexington, 266- 

7786,255-6666 
McCamish, Dan, 374 Oak Street, Lot 10, Radcliff, 254-2209 
McClure, William S., P. O. Box 343, London, 864-6940, 679- 

1601 
McDaniel, Glenn R., Lewis Hall No. 1 2, Morehead 
McDonald, Walter, Route 1, Box 79, Corydon, 533-6637, 

827-2506 
McKenzie, James M., 608 Walnut, Flatwoods, 836-9140, 836- 

9140 
Manass, Charlie I., Frenchburg, 744-6000 (Bus.) 
Marklay, George, 3869 Matson Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio, 791- 

2052 



Martin, James, McKee, 287-7947 

May, Karl, 2039 Rainbow, Lexington, 277-6748 

Mills, D. K„ Zimmerman Apartments No. 10, Murray, 753- 

9521 753-9521 
Moore, Donald, Box 96, Calvert City, 395-4661, 395-4030 
Moore, Donald R., McKee, 287-7639 
Moore, William G., Alvin Street, Flatwoods, 836-6508, 836- 

6508 
O'Nan, Harold L., 2474 Green River Road, Henderson, 826- 

4959, 424-7741 (Evansville, Ind.) 
Osborne, Robert "Happy", 791 Mildred, Versailles, 873-5707, 

873-4889 
Parks, Gary R., Route 6, Richmond, 623-7342, 623-1767 
Peay, Curtis, C-19, Bowling Green, 843-3616, 843-8171 
Peck, Guy D., Route 6, Benton, 898-2707, 753-7111 
Peeno, Harry R., 124 Morris Road, Lookout Heights, 331- 

1981 
Pollock, Robert, Irvington, 547-5341 
Powell, Billy R., Box 504, Elkhorn City. 754-8702 
(Continued on Page 9) 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1969 



Official Dickerson Ratings For The 1969 Football Season 



CLASS A 

REGION I 

District 1 

Team W 

1. Russellville 4 

2. Ft. Campbell 5 

3. Trigg County 4 

4. Fulton 3 

5. Murray. 2 

6. Fulton County 1 

7. North Marshall 1 

8. Crittenden County 

District 2 

1. Tompkinsville. 9 

2. Campbellsville 6 

3. Caverna 5 

4. Allen County 6 

5. Glasgow 3 

6. Cumberland County 4 

7. Warren Central 1 

8. Butler County 2 

9. Greensburg 2 

10. Metcalfe County 1 

1 1 . Warren East 

REGION II 

District 1 

1. Bardttewn S 

2. Eminence 3 

3. Henry County 1 

3. Lou. Cty. Day 3 

5. Lebanon 2 

5. Shelbyville 2 

S. Washington 2 

8. Ky. Mil. Inst 1 

District 2 

1. Stanford S 

2. Scott County 4 

3. Boyle County 4 

3. Madison 3 

5. Sayre 4 

6. Frankfort 2 

7. Harrodsburg 4 

8. Garrard County 2 

9. Mercer Count n.,,, 3 

10. Burgin 1 

11. Anderson County 1 

12. Berea 1 

13. Ky. School Deaf 

14. Georgetown 

REGION III 

District 1 

1. Dayton 5 

2. Ludlow 3 

3. McKell 3 

4. Beechwood 3 

5. Wurtland 2 

6. Bellevue 1 

7. Raceland 2 

8. Carroll County 1 

9. Catlettsburg 

9. Owen County 

uutrict 2 

1. Mt. Sterling 4 

2. Rowan County 6 

3. Paris S 

4. M.M.I 3 

5. Bath County S 

5. Fleming County 3 

5. Maysville 3 

5. Montgomery County .... 2 

9. Morgan County 2 

10. Lewis County 

1 1 . Wcholas County 



T 


Rating 





25.00 





21.25 





18.34 





15.00 





14.00 





12.50 





12.00 





10.00 





27.50 





23.75 


1 


20.13 





19.29 


1 


18.75 





15.00 


1 


14.38 


1 


13.58 





12.50 


2 


12.00 





10.00 









22.50 


1 





18.75 


4 





17.50 


I 





17.50 


2 





15.00 


2 





15.00 


2 





15.00 


5 





11.67 





2 


26.25 








22.50 


1 





21. IS 


1 





21.25 




1 




1 


20.00 
19.37 


2 


1 


18.22 


a 





16.00 


4 





14.29 


3 





12.50 


4 





12.00 


6 


6 


11.43 


3 


1 


11.25 


4 





10.00 









27.50 


2 





19.00 


1 





18.75 


2 





18.00 


2 





17.50 


2 


1 


16.25 


2 





15.00 


3 


1 


13.00 


4 





10.00 


4 





10.00 








25.00 








22.50 


1 





19.17 


2 





18.00 


5 





15.00 


3 





15.00 


3 





15.00 


2 





15.00 


4 





13.34 


6 





10.00 


8 





10.00 



REGION IV 

District 1 

1. Lynch 4 

2. Harlan 3 

2. Pineville 3 

4. Williamsburg 4 

5. Lynn Camp 3 

6. Hazel Green 2 

7. London 2 

8. Lily 1 

). Mt. Vernon 

District 2 

1. Paintsville 5 

2. Jenkins 5 

3. Elkhorn City 5 

4. Louisa 3 

5. Pikeville 5 

6. Virgie 4 

7. Wheelwright 2 

8. Johns Creek 2 

9. Fleming Neon 1 
10. Mullins 

CLASS AA 

REGION I 

District 1 
Team W 

1. May field 5 

2. Paducah 3 

3. Franklin Simpson 4 

4. Caldwell County 4 

5. Lone Oak .2 

6. Bowling Green 1 

6. Hopkinsville 1 

8. Christian County 

District 2 

1. Madisonville 6 

2. Daviess County 5 

3. Owensboro 4 

4. Owensboro Catholic 4 

5. Union County 3 

6. Henderson County 2 

7. Henderson 1 

8. Ohio County 

REBION II 

District 1 

1. Elizabethtown 7 

2. Nelson County 4 

3. LaRue County 5 

4. Meade County 5 

5. Fort Knox 5 

6. North Hardin 2 

7. Oldham County 1 

7. Shepherdsville 1 

9. Breckinridge County. 1 

10. Shelby County 

District 2 

1. Woodford County 4 

2. Danville . - 3 

3. •Lafayette .3 

4. Henry Clay ' . . • . . 2 

5. Somerset 

6. Jessamine County 



REGION III 

District 1 

Team W L 

1. Campbell County 7 1 

2. Covington Catholic 4 

3. Boone County 5 1 

4. Highlands 5 2 

5. Boyd County 3 2 

6. Dixie Heights 4 3 

7. Holmes 4 4 

9. Lloyd Memorial 2 4 

8. Paul Blazer 1 4 

10. Simon Kenton 2 5 

•Defeated Henry Clay 






27.50 





23.75 





23.75 





20.00 





18.00 





14.00 





13.34 





12.00 





10.00 


1 


28.12 





23.75 


1 


21.88 





20.00 


1 


19.73 


1 


19.59 





12.86 





12.50 





11.67 





10.00 



L 


T 


Rating 








27.50 


1 





21.25 


2 





18.34 


2 





18.00 


2 





15.00 


4 





12.00 


4 





12.00 


4 





10.00 








27.50 


1 





23.75 


3 





20.00 


3 





17.86 


4 





14.29 


5 





12.86 


6 





11.43 


4 





10.00 








27.50 





1 


23.13 


2 


1 


20.63 


3 





19.38 


2 





17.86 


6 





12.50 


4 





12.00 


4 





12.00 


S 





11.67 


s 





10.00 








25.00 


2 





19.00 


2 





17.50 


2 





17.50 


3 


1 


11.25 


4 


1 


11.00 



T 


Rating 





26.25 





25.00 





23.75 





22.50 





18.00 





17.86 





15.00 





13.34 





14.00 





12.86 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1969 



Page Nine 






11. Russell 1 

12. Newport 

13. Newport Catholic 

District 2 

1. Bryan Statioa 6 

2. Tates Creek 3 

3. George R. Clark 4 

4. Harrison County 3 

5. Franklin County 2 

6. Bourbon County 1 

7. Madison Central 



REGION IV 

District 1 

l.'Corbin 6 

1. 'Cumberland 4 

3. Bell County 2 

4. Middlesboro 2 

5. Knox Central 1 

5. Wayne County 2 

7. Evarts 1 

7. Russell County 1 

7. Whitley County 1 

10. James Cawood 1 

•Tie-Corbin won playoff 



District 2 

1. Belfry 4 

2. Hazard. 3 

3. Prestonsburg 2 

4. M. C. Napier 1 

4. Whitesburg 1 

6. Leslie County 






12.50 





10.00 





N.R. 





27.50 





21.25 





20.00 





18.00 





14.00 





12.00 





10.00 



22.50 
22.50 
17.00 
16.00 
15.00 
15.00 
12.50 
12.50 
12.50 
12.00 



22.50 
18.75 
15.00 
12.50 
12.50 
10.00 



CLASS AAA 

REGION I 

District 1 
Team W 

1. St. Xavier 8 

2. Trinity 6 

3. Atherton 5 

4. DuPont Manual 6 

4. Male 6 

6. Flaget 3 

7. Central 1 

8. Bishop David 2 

9. Shawnee 1 

10. Iroquois 1 

11. DeSales 1 

REGION II 

District 2 

1 . Butler 6 

2. Valley 4 

3. Southern 4 

4. Western 3 

5. Fairdale 1 

6. Pleasure Ridge „ 

7. Doss 

District 2 

1. Thomas Jefferson 6 

2. Jeffersontown 6 

3. Seneca 5 

4. Durrett 3 

4. Waggener 2 

6. •Westport 3 

7. Eastern 2 

8. Fern Creek 

•Defeated Eastern 



Rating 
27.50 
23.75 
21.25 
18.34 
18.34 
13.75 
13.25 
12.86 
12.14 
11.43 
11.25 



25.00 
21.25 
18.34 
16.67 
13.00 
11.67 
10.84 

22.50 
19.17 
18.58 
15.00 
15.00 
14.29 
14.29 
10.00 



BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(Continued from Page 7) 

Pursiful, Charles E., P. O. Box 229, Pineville, 377-5540, 337- 

2392 
Ramsey, Paul A., Box 91, Clay City, 663-2780 
Rankin, James, 1018 S. 29th Street, No. 7, Louisville, 778- 

4040. 778-0920 
Ratliff, Johnny, Paintsville, 297-4884 

Rawdon, Richard M., 401 'East College Street, Georgetown 
Reed, William F., Sr., 633 Dartmoor Drive, Lexington, 299- 

1130, 299-0411 
Reihing, Dan, P. O. Box 582, Shepherdsville, 543-2633, 543- 

2633 
Ricketts, Claude O., 1 506 Larchmont Avenue, Louisville, 

635-6536, 634-1551 
Rison, Johnny Berry, 197 Third Street, Ravenna, 723 : 2852 
Roberts, Gerald, Normal Hall No. 40, Morehead, 784-9286 
Sanderson, William F., P. O. Box 145, ,Whitley City, 376- 

2377 
Scales, Meredith E., Ingle, 871-3297 
Scalf, Hubert Dean, Stanville, 478-5541 
Sharp. Robert J.. 2909 Jessup, Cincinnati, Ohio, 681-2110 
Shield, Raymond, 510 Main Street, Sturgis, 333-2851, 333- 

4008 
Shumaker, Thurman E., Route 2, Princeton, 365-6550, 886- 

3921 
Slone, Ercel, Neon, 855-9491 
Smith, David W., 702-D Warrendale Court, Georgetown, 863- 

0534, 863-0534 
Somerville, John T., Athletic Dept., Georgetown College, 

Georgetown, 535-6252, 863-7291 
Somerville, Robert J., 6852 Greenmeadow Circle, Louisville, 

895-8003, 583-3859 
Stagnolia, Eugene, 308 N.Y. Road, Cumberland, 589-2344, 

589-4625 
Stephenson, Reese D., Henry Ward Place, Morehead 
Stone. , Kenneth W., 1 127 Clay Street, Henderson, VA6-9336 
Stuart, Terrance Ray, 909 Orchard Drive, Russellville, 726- 

6492, 726-6434 
Tackett, Paul Bennett, Box 96. Canada 
Taylor, Dan C, Jr., Letcher, 633-2524 (Bus.) 
Thompson, Frank Van, 1002 College Courts, Murray, 762- 

2449 
Thompson, Garland, 621 Wichita Drive, Lexington, 277-7935 

299-1020 



Thompson, Thomas A., 3435 Greentree Road, Lexington, 

266-8921, 564-4796 (Frankfort) 
Thornsberry, Gary, 1024 Main Street, Sturgis, 333-2243, 762- 

2030 
Tillery, William E., Route 1, Dixie Park, Berea, 986-4576, 

623-7177 
Towler, Stephen W., Route 2, Box 476, Ashland, 928-9944 

836-3531 
Troutman, David C, Route, 1, Hawesville, 927-3411, 927-2201 
Turley.Roy McKinley, 420 Chestnut Street, Berea, 986-4131 

(Bus.) 
Tygrett, James, SlOMatson Place, Cincinnati, Ohio, 921-4440, 

921-5700 
Vaughn, Ronald G.. Freeburn, 456-3464 
Veneklase, Bruce G. 403 Lindsay Court, Apt. No.l, Louis- 
ville, 893-7376, 774-5781 
Voorhis, Ken, 8308 Pandorea Drive, Louisville, 937-9831, 

935-3155 
Walton, Roy, 2148 Lakeside Drive, Lexington, 266-5348, 

266-0532 
Ward, Ken W., Versailles, 873-8308, 266-1161 
Ward, Randall, Buckingham, 938-2261 
Watson, Neil Stanton, Hueysville, 358-4306 
Weatherford, Charlie, 2208 S. Virginia, Hopkinsville, 886, 

7459, 886-3921 
Welker, David, 215 Wooldridge, Hopkinsville, 886-4064, 886- 

3921 
Wells, Wayne, 910 Gardenia, Campbellsville, 465-8434, 465- 

8736 
Wemhoener, James M., P. O. Box 94, Fordsville, 276-5122 
Whalen, William C, Route 1, Maysville, 564-3942, 564-3461 
Wheat, Buell, 403 N. Sixth Street, Scottsville, 237-3057, 2 37- 

3333 
Wheeler, Joe H., Box 8, Ferguson, 679-2903, 561-9493 
White, Roger C, 4121 Eden Lane, Louisville, 448-4720, 258- 

9000, Ext. 39373 
Whistler, Tom, Box 172, Georgetown, 863-8416 
Williams, Dawn Benny, Route 3, Philpot, 729-4566 
Williams, Robert L., Town Manor, Apt. No. 7, Georgetown, 

863-0450 
Williamson, Dennis Gene, Hales Lock Shop, Route 2, Apt. 4, 

Murray, 753-9332 
Winders, Bobby G. , Route 1, White Plains, 676-3945, 676- 

3443 
Wireman, Chalmer, Box 68, Lovely, 395-5171 
Wolford, James Burton, College Post Office No. 2233, Berea, 

986-8976, 986-8976 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1969 



Woods, Gene B., 1510 Story, Murray, 753-8718, 395-4180 

(Calvert City) 
Wyatt, Henry, P. O. Box 385, Paris, 987-4756, 2 54-6412, Ext. 

338 



TRACK FILMS 
(Continued from November ATHLETE) 

JUMPS AND POLE VAULT, s-c-a, 1 reel, $2.00 

Demonstrations from actual competition are shown 
for running high-jump; running board jump; hop, step 
and jump; and pole vault. Slow motion photography is 
used for detailed study of form. 
MIDDLE DISTANCES, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $2.00 

Sprinting techniques-ball of foot running-Auto- 
matic stride-pendulum and bicycle stride-exercise- 
counterbalanced arm action-push drive-jockeying for 
position. 
POLE VAULT, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $2.00 

Basic vaulting principles-importance of exercises- 
running action-grip-selecting the pole-take-off-Western 
and Eastern style-slotting-novice training. 
THE RELAYS, j-s-c-a, 1 ree., $2.00 

Passing-visual pass-blind pass-right and left ex- 
change-merging of runners speed-baton grips-relay 
starts, under hand action-cup style-overhead sprint 
pass-fly scoop-practice and team work. 
THE SPRINTS, j-s-c-a, 2 reelsf, $3.00 

Fundamentals of 100 yard and 200 yard dash- 
impact style and natural stretch stride-synchronizing 
leg and arm action-conditioning exercises-starting tech- 
niques-slow motion of muscular utilization and coord- 
ination. 
SHOT PUT, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $2.00 

Fitting styles to physiques-tension control-one, two, 
three rhythm-exercises-finger and hand grip-finger 
and wrist snap-foot positions-progressive tension and 
eff oil -explosive hip snap. 

THIS IS TRACK AND FIELD, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, 
$1.00 

Uses the Olympic motto "Citius-Altius-Fortius," 
"Swifter-Higher-Stronger," to introduce a variety of 
track and field situations. Helps officials, coaches, 
participants and fans to better understand the basic 
rules of running, jumping, vaulting and throwing. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED FOOTBALL OFFICIALS 



If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it 
is the home phone unless otherwise designated. If two numbers 
are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Adams, Richard Wayne, 218 Waddill Avenue, Madisonville, 

821-1381, 821-5246 
Douthwaite, Donald D., 6616 Merwin Avenue, Cincinnati, 

Ohio, 661-091 5, 662-0892 
Easley, Dan W., 107 Morrison, Wilmorei 
McClure, Thomas S., 204 Madison, Bardstown, 348-9662 
McCoy, Harold T., 2994 Pennsylvania Avenue, Charleston, 

West Virginia 
Nolley, Thomas E., 824 Maple Drive, Morecott Addition, 

Sissonville, West Virginia 
Sharp, Robert J., 2909 Jessup. Cincinnati, Ohio, 681-2110 



THOMAS JEFFERSON - CLASS AAA 
CROSS COUNTRY CO-CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Terry Hansell, Billy Spinner, 

Tom Gorter, Second Row: Glenn Haley, Marc Beyerle, Third 
Row: lohn Roders, Brian Lively, Coach Ken Combs. 



THE COACHES' CODE 



My first consideration shall be the welfare of the boys. My 
leadership shall be wholesome and contribute to cleaner liv- 
ing, better health habits and a true respect for the rules of play, 
authority of officials and consideration of not only the op- 
ponent but also all with whom contact is had. 

My objective shall be to make competitive athletics truly 
a part of the educational program. 

My personal conduct on the field, in the school and out, 
shall be such as to be truly worthy of imitation by the boys 
whose welfare is my job. 

My relationship with the players, fellow coaches, teachers 
and school authorities shall be such as to develop mutual re- 
spect and confidence. 

My objective shall be to win, if possible, to lose, if nec- 
essary, but at all times to have the conduct of all contribute 
to a fuller understanding and a keener appreciation of fair 
play. 

I shall teach that Good Sportsmanship is Good Citizenship 
and as such is essential to individuals, communities, state and 
nation. 

— unknown. 



BASEBALL FILMS 

BASEBALL ALL-STAR GAME OF 1956, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, 
color, $1.00 

The All-Star Game of 1956 was played in Griffith Stadium 
at Washington. Stars of the American and National Leagues 
are pictured in action during the pre-game activities. High- 
lights of the game are shown as the National League wins by 
a score of 7-3. 

BASEBALL ALL-STAR GAME OF 1958, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, 
color, $1.00 

Twenty-five all-stars from the American League defeat an 
equal number of National League greats by a score of 4-3 at 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1969 

MAYFIELD - CLASS AA, REGION 1 , CHAMPION 



Page Eleven 




J II II ft f f 



it H II 



(Left to Right) Front Row: Jerry Sanders, Van Pitman, Danny Walker, Dennis Toon, Don Cosley, Brad Wilson, Andy 
Anderson, Rick Lankin, Johnny Hendon, Second Row: Randy Rains, Kent Stone, Robert Mayfield, Greg Rains, Sam Wy- 
lie, Tim Holloway, Henry Jenkins, David Fowler. Third Row: Butch Anderson, Jim Kurt, Alan Coleman, Scott Qualk, 
Steve Anderson, Marvin Hollingsworth, Chris Cook. Fourth Row: Charles Bobo, Barry Harmon, Greg Waldrop, Francis Dil- 
lard, Mark Stone, Mike Adams, Keith Young. Fifth Row: David Guthrie, Nathan Biggers, Hollis Jackson, Collins Wilson, 
Karl Anderson, Dwight Lovelace. Sixth Row: Collins Byrn, Ray Mac Shell, Steve Boyd. 

CAMPBELL COUNTY - CLASS AA, REGION 3, DISTRICT 1, CHAMPION 







(Left to Right) Front Row: Larry Mains, Greg Chilleli, John Osterhage, Doug Reed, Dan Halfhill, Dennis Schwartz, 
Dave Thornton, Dale Trapp, Gary Nelson, Dan Schwalbach, John Wagoner, Tom Gindeile, Charlie Corbin, Steve Goban, 
Dick Wright. Second Row: Mgr. Tom Daley, Mascot Scott Abney, Coach Tom Mohr, Tim Bell, Craig Hadorn, Mooch Webb, 
Greg McGaha, Dave Hines, Jim Newman, Mark Wegford, Steve Granger, Bill Bohart, Leroy Robbins, Steve Morris, Dave 
Longshore, Tom Goshorn, Bill Osterhage, Bruce Schlake, Dave Dunn, Bob Hayes, Mgr. Rick Bersch. Third Row: Coach Ray 
lies, Coach John Scheper, Dave Hollan, Dave Meyer, Gary Kohls, Dan Kroger, John Govan, Mike Klein, Dave Hillner, Jeff 
McCarthy, Weslee Nelson, Jay Forbes, Bob Wilson, Chuck Thomer, Jeryl Smith, Paul Rath, Ken Raines, Coach Tom Haas, 
Coach Jerry Racke. Fourth Row: Coach Jerry Abney, Al Jordan, Stan Hill, Chuck Bell, Terry Heilman, Ray Turner, Greg 
Schaber, Vaughn Hatcher, Bill Deaton, Larry Little, Alan Kline, Ron Neiser, Rich Mason, Dave Ragan, Pat Tischner, Coach 
Bob Miller. 



Baltimore. Close-ups of the baseball stars of today and inter- 
esting plays of the game are shown in the film. (KHSAA) 
BASEBALL ALL-STAR GAME OF 1965, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, 
color, $1.00 

In the 36th all-star game at the home of the Minnesota 
Twins in Minneapolis the National League conquered the 
American League by 6-5. A crowd of over 47,000 saw Willie 
Mays hit the first pitch of the game for a home run. (KHSAA) 
BASEBALL ALL-STAR GAME OF 1966, j-s-c-a, 1% reels, 
color, $1.00 

The greats of the National League battle the stars of the 
American League in the new 26 million dollar Busch Stadium 
at St. Louis. The National League won the game in the tenth 
inning as Ned McCarver scored on a single by Maury Wills. 
Close-ups of the stars are shown as they warm up for each 
game. (KHSAA) 

BASEBALL ALL-STAR GAME OF 1967, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, 
color, $1.00 

The National and American League All-Star Game was 
played in the new Anaheim Stadium, home of the California 



Angels. The Phillies' Richie Allen homered in the first inning 
and Frank Robinson of Baltimore tied the score in the second! 
In the fifteenth inning Tony Perez of Cincinnati broke the 
tie and won the game for the National League by hitting a 
home run. (KHSAA) 
BASEBALL HALL OF FAME, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, $1.00 

This fUm shows the annual meeting at Cooperstown. N. Y. 
when new names are added to the Hall of Fame list. Numer- 
ous stars of the past return to the shrine each year at this 
time and are shown as their feats on the diamond are related. 
The history of Cooperstown and the purpose of the Hall of 
Fame are explained in the picture. 
BATTER UP, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels (22 Min), color, $1.00 

Produced by National and American Leagues of Baseball, 
Shows the proper techniques of batting as demonstrated by 
hitting stars of the majors, Stan Musial, Ted Williams, Mickey 
Mantle, Ernie Banks, Willie Mays and others. 
BATTING FUNDAMENTALS, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Basic skills which must be mastered beforelone becomes 
an accomplished hitter. But selection, stance, grip, stride, 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1969 



THOMAS JEFFERSON - CLASS AAA, REGION 2, DISTRICT 2, CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: W. Kelter, B. Thomas, O. Robinson, S. Stephens, M. Dewalt, C. Williams, D. Fink, R. Parr, 
M. Northington, B. Terry, C. Hudson, G. Brown, T. Gray. Second Row: R. Evans, G. Stone, W. Cherry, K. Bruce, P. Osborne, 
L. Zabel, D. Hornback, B. Green, W. Riles, J. McPherson, D. Skaggs, J. Bishop. Third Row: M. Harriet, D. Charlet, J. Brown, 
N. Butler, D. Summers, R. Carr, L. Goffner, W. Lee, J. Edwards, D. Savage, J. Bond. Fourth Row: R. Trotter, L. Cowan, T. 
McCage, G. Camp, D. Crabtree, T. Taylor, G. Metzger, R. Cooley, W. Burks, R. Parson. Fifth Row: N. Hill, W. Burks, V. Bas- 
ket, D. McDonald, A. King, H. Hill, J. Trowell, C. Thompson, L. Clay. 

STANFORD - CLASS A, REGION 2, DISTRICT 2, CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Mgr. Wm. Newsome, Buddy Jackson, Jim Adams, Dan Gilliam, Mike Long, Barry Mercer, 
Bill Hester, Brian Mercer, Mike Jenkins, Tom Jones, Greg Noland. Second Row: Barry Helm, Don Stephens, Don Gilliam, 
Jim Hazlett, Jim McGuffey, Gary Johnson, Mark Denham, David Keltner, Marshall Scott, Mike Welch, Steve Keltner, David 
Morris, Kenneth Horseman. Third Row: Mgr. Ed Bowling, Brad Burchett, Kenny Kidd, Bob Denny, Sam Gooch, Bernard 
Brown, David Cornelius, Kenny Lowe, Bill Cooper, Marvin Marshbanks, Bill Jones, Bruce Mercer, James Howard, Coach Tom 
Grimes, Coach Bill Ed Leedy. 



swing ana tollow-through are clearly demonstrated in this 

film by professional players. 

THE BATTING STARS OF BASEBALL, s-c-a, 3 reels, $1.00 

Who are the big names among batters and what makes 
them good? Watch the featured hitters as shown in this film, 
learn the secrets of their styles and forms, and try it yourself. 
For clubs as well as classes. 
CATCHING IN BASEBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

The basic skills in catching baseball are presented in this 
film. How to catch a high rapid ball, a batted ball, a thrown 

hall and a prnnnH hall ale shown. ^tanr.p. mntinn and close- 

up photography are used to enable the viewer to follow each 

step or movement in each ot the basic skills. 

CATCHING STARS OF BASEBALL, i-s-c-a, 2 reels, $1.00 

This is a film designed to assist in the coaching of catchers 
but it is also interesting and entertaining. Correct methods 
and techniques of receiving, throwing, signaling and fielding 
are illustrated by Bill Dickey, Sherman Lollar, Yogi Berra and 
Roy Campanella. 
DEMOCRACY OF BASEBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $1.00 

The purpose of this film is for further development of 
young baseball players in our modern democracy and illust- 
rates this through sports and sports competition. This film 
includes a brief history of baseball along wi*h a cavalcade of 

Bast and present stars. 
OUBLE-PLAY KINGS OF BASEBALL, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, 
$1.00 



This Olmnresentsan analysis of jthe double play in base- 
ball. Different players from several major leagues are shown 
in action. Fielding, tagging, and throwing are illustrated and 
explained. 
FIFTY YEARS OF BASEBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $1.00 

Facts of the immortal stars of baseball are recalled in this 
fifty years of memories. Shows some famous oldumers as 
their exploits are narrated and great moments of action in 
the lives of the more recent baseball heroes. (KHSAA) 
HITTING IN BASEBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Slow motion and close-up photography are used to follow 
accurately and graphically the basic fundamentals of hitting 
in baseball Coordination of feet. l egs, hips, shoulders, arm. 
and head is explained. How to select a bat, how to hold it, and 
correct batXih .position are shown. 
INFIELD PLAY AT 1st AND 3rd, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $1.00 

The fundamentals and finer points of infield play at first 
third bases are illustrated by big league players. Fielding, 
stance, throwing, tagging runners, ect., pictured often in slow 
motion. Sponsored by A. G. Spalding Co., the American and 
National Leagues. 
INSIDE BASEBALL j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $1.00 

Fundamentals of baseball, including pitching, batting, 
fielding, and base-running, are demonstrated. Note: This film 
was placed with the library through the courtesy of the Ken- 
tucky High School Athletic Association. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1 969 



Page Thirteen 




BARDSTOWN - CLASS A FINALIST 



f rorf -* 



&& t <*r*UHL'* k W*r ¥ 








(Left to Right) Front Row: Jerry Seabrooks, Henry Greenwell, Reginald Mudd, Gary Smith, David Hayden, George 
Crume, Mark Mathis, Jimmy Unseld. Second Row: Danny Gilkey, McCawley Ballard, Freddie Hamilton, Henry Cecil, 
Richard Mason, Ronald Molohon, Steve Campbell, Mike Allen, Leslie Hurst. Third Row: Buddy Martin, Mike Wickliffe, 
Terry Allen, Gary Newton, Rick McKay, Burke Carothers, Ronald Geoghegan, Bob Fulkerson, Jerry Willett, Fourth Row: 
Dennis Werner, James Logan, Joe Lee Phillips, Michael Ballard, John Prewitt, Darrell Hawkins, Johnny Branson, Mike Hurst. 

BELFRY - CLASS AA, REGION 4, DISTRICT 2, CHAMPION 




' 



5*K 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Alan Brooks, Greg Williams, Mike Matney, Bill Sparks, James May, Gary Hopkins, Richie 
Phillips, Charles Frazier, Charles Brown, John Towles, Glen Carroll. Second Row: David Goins, Cap Woods, Roy Bogar, 
Jerry Brooks, Gary Hensley, Joe Sparks, Ricky Hackney, Benjamin Hubbard, Gary Layne, Mike Smith, Terry Hatfield. 
Third Row: Coach Albert Vipperman, Coach Bernard Collier, Randall Stanley, Roy Blackburn, Bill Bevins, Gary Hopkins, 
Randy Hackney, Ricky Blackburn, Sidney Williamson, Larry Durham, Roger Hatfield, Randy Runyon, Dennis Fite, Coach 
Rodney Varney, Coach Tommy Dean Runyon. Fourth Row: Greg Hatfield, Kevin, Hatfield, Steve Martin, Rick Mullins, 
David M. Stacy, Mike Cochran, Gary Bevins, Randy Staton, Thomas Varney, David L. Stacy, Gary Varney, Gary Hopkins. 



KNOW YOUR BASEBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, $1.00 

Modern photographic techniques, such as: stop action, 
split screen, and instant replay are combined with colorful 
play situations to provide a truly outstanding presentation of 
the rules of baseball. (KHSAA) 

OCTOBER MADNESS-THE WORLD SERIES, e-j-s-c-a, 2% 
reels, $1.00 

Shows many of the unforgettable feats performed by play- 
ers as they happened in World Series past. Dramatic plays 
that made everlasting heroes are highlighted along with the 
anguish felt by the victims. (KHSAA) 
OFFICIAL BASEBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, $1.00 

Informative and entertaining play situations used to depict 
official rules interpretations covering the phases of batting, 
pitching, base running, fielding and umpiring. Stimulates inter- 
est and knowledge Tor fans, players, officials and baseball 
administrators. 
PITCHING STARS OF BASEBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels $1.00 

Shows four of the leading pitchers in action. Types of 
pitches and methods of practice are portrayed. 
PLAY BALL, SON, j-s, 1% reels,. $2 50 



Joe Cronin introduces this film showing a group ot four- 
teen-year-old boys who are experts in baseball. Correct me- 
thods of hitting, catching, and throwing are demonstrated in 
natural and slow motion. Based on book by Bert V. Dunne. 
THROWING IN BASEBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Slow motion, close-up and stop photography are used in 
presenting the basic fundamentals of throwing in baseball. 
Instructions are given for the overthrows, three-quarter side, 
side, and underhand throws. Coordination of foot and arm 
motion is stressed, as well as coordination of the body as a 
whole. 
TOUCHING ALL BASES, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, $1.00 

This film is intended to teach youngsters baseball by show- 
ing various American League stars playing their positions. It 
is also intended to give fans as a whole a better understanding 
and knowledge of the national pastime. The film shows Father 
Flanagan and his Boys Town team, the Hall of Fame Cermonies 
in Cooperstown, N. Y., and scenes from night baseball games. 
THE UMPIRE IN BASEBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $1.00 



Page Fourteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1969 



BRYAN STATION - CLASS AA FINALIST 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Robert Pemberton, Pat Manley, Steve Ibershoff, Lee Hudson, Frank Danko, Mike Schneider, 
Mike Davis Malcolm Irvin, Jeff Land, Gary Webb, David Shrout, Clyde Proctor, Earl Blythe, James Wells, Stan Litteral, 
David Courtney Rick Croker, Dennis McGruder, Ronald Luft, Robert Myers, Ken Muse. Second Row: Ricky Hiler, John 
Davis Rick Proctor, Doug Elam, Bruce Spry, Frankie Corea, Faye Young. James White, Rufus Miller, Steve Hellard, Gary 
Smith KenChenault Fred Parker, Dan Lily, Alex Green, Robert Briscoe, Lamont Lawson, Walter Hamilton, Ralph Stanton, 
Billy Moore, Gary Williams, Mike Meehan, Third Row: Ken Kirk, Mark Monthie, Mike Campbell, James Eversole, Dewayne 
Virgil Pat Bryne, Ronald Briscoe, Allan Sumner, Mike Curtis, Norman Olson, Gayle Pryor, Glen Kitchen, Rod Johnson, 
Tim Adams, Gary Webb, Kenny Ray, Doug Brashear, Kenny Coyle, Mike Cooper, Kenny Crum, Jerry Prather. Fourth Row: 
Eddie Neal, Fred Parker, Danny Brown, Andrew Rice, Shelby White, William Briscoe, Jim Jacobson, Marcus Hardy, Warren 
Gorrell, David Truedell, John Sebring, Larry McCormick, Daryl Travis, Mike Daliak, Junior Hardin, Frank LeMaster, Jimmy 
Dunn, Virgil Covington, Charles Sciantrelli, Tommy Kerns. 



Summarizes importance of the umpire to the baseball 
game. Explanation of the duties of the umpire and also qual- 
ifications for job, showing where they receive their training. 
WORLD SERIES OF 1954, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $1.00 

Highlights of the game between the Cleveland Indians and 
the New York Giants are shown in this film. The Giants, 
sparked by the sensational hitting of Rhodes, defeated the 
Indians in four straight games. The Indians had set a record 
for the number of games won in winning the American Lea- 
gue pennant. 
WORLD SERIES OF 1955, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels, color, $1.00 

Brooklyn Dodgers and the New York Yankees are shown in 
this film. The commentary leading up to each game makes the 
film interesting as the Dodgers win the world championship. 
WORLD SERIES OF 1957, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels, $1.00 

The American League champion New York Yankees carry 
the series the full seven games before bowing to the Milwaukee 
Braves, champion of the National League. The film catches 
most of the hitting and shows the plays in which runs were 
scored in each game. The narrator, Lew Fonseca, describes 
the play and fills in the background with interesting bits of 
information concerning the game. 
WORLD SERIES OF 1959, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels, color, $1.00 

The highlights of the six games played in the series be- 
tween the Los Angeles Dodgers and the Chicago White Sox 
are shown in this film. The Dodgers won the series by defeat- 
ing the White Sox four games to two. Most of the scoring 
plays are filmed, along with many of the outstanding defen- 
sive plays. The color that goes with these games is captured in 
the film. 

WORLD SERIES OF 1960, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels, (44 Min.), color, 
$1.00 

Exciting moments of the seven games between the New 
York Yankees of the American League carried the series its 
full seven games before bowing to National League Pittsburgh 
Bucs. Highlights of all seven games are shown and the action 
described. 

WORLD SERIES OF 1961, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels, (44 Min.), color, 
$1.00 

Narrated by Mel Allen, this film shows the Cincinnati Reds 
were able to win only the second game in the series against 
the New York Yankees. Superb pitching of Whitey Ford and 
batting power of the Yankees brought them the world's 
championship after five games. 
WORLD SERIES OF 1962, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, color, $1.00 

Key plays from all seven games are shown as the New York 
Yankees of the American League retain the world's champion- 
ship by defeating the San Francisco Giants by the score of 1-0 
in the final game. 



WORLD SERIES OF 1963, j-s-c-a, 4 reels (44 Min.), color, 
$1.00 

Shows highlights of games in which the Los Angeles Dod- 
gers won the baseball championship by defeating the New York 
Yankees in four straight games. 

WORLD SERIES OF 1964, j-s-c-a, 4 reels (44 Min.), color, 
$1.00 

The St. Louis Cardinals topped the New York Yankees in 
the first game, 9-5, and went on to win the series to become 
the world's champions for 1965. Covers all the exciting plays 
in the games. 
WORLD SERIES OF 1965, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels, color, $1.00 

Shows highlights of the games in which the Minnesota 
Twins take the first two games at Minneapolis from Los An- 
geles and the Dodgers come back to win the next four games 
with Sandy Koufax pitching the seventh game for the world's 
champion. (KHSAA) 
WORLD SERIES OF 1966, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, color, $1.00 

The Baltimore Orioles amazed the sports world as they de- 
feated the Los Angeles Dodgers in four straight games to win 
the world championship. Even the great Sandy Koufax and 
Don Drysdale could not silence the bats of Frank Robinson 
and Brooks Robinson. Show the action plays in all four games. 
(KHSAA) 
WORLD SERIES OF 1967, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels, color, $1.00 

The St. Louis Cardinals need the full seven games to win 
the championship over the Boston Red Sox. Harry Carey nar- 
rates the play as Jim Lonborg, aided by slugger Carl Yastrem- 
ski, wins two games for the Sox but cannot match the three 
wins by Bob Gibson of the Cards. (KHSAA) 
WORLD SERIES OF 1968, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels (44 Min.), color, 
$1.00 

The Detroit Tigers, playing in the World Series for the 
first time in twenty-three years, beat the St. Louis Cardinals 
by four games to three. The Cardinals took a 3 to 1 lead but 
the Tigers came back to win the series. Mickey Lolich won 
three games for the Tigers. Bob Gibson won two games for 
the Cardinals but was the loser in the final game. (KHSAA) 

Extra Curricular Sports 

By Helen M. Morsink 
Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant 
EDITOR'S NOTE: The following article by Miss Morsink, pro- 
fessor of education at Central Michigan University in Mount 
Pleasant, illustrates unusual understanding of the purposes of 
the interscholastic athletic program and the values which can 
be gained from it. Everyone connected with administration of 
secondary school athletics needs to be reminded periodically 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1969 



Page Fifteen 



BUTLER - CLASS AAA FINALIST 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Coach Cotlina. P. Garrett, S. Jewell, J. Webb, M. Manley, S. Motter, R. Robinson, D. Mc- 
Donald, J. Fisher, D. Hogan, R. Brooks, Second Row: Coach Crum, H. Johnson, K. Goodlet, M. Perpich, R. French, E. Mudd, 
T. Lampton, B. Jennings, D. Meyer, J. Phelps, Coach Nachand. Third Row: Coach Schalk, C. Stewart, F. Kitchens, R. 
George, G. Collard, T. Williams, K. Jones, D. Horn, P. Carroll, Coach Orwick. Fourth Row: M. Johnson, R. McDonald, 
J. Southall, D. Kotheimer, R. Lindauer, M. Campbell, C. Byrne, T. Story, B. Showalter. Fifth Row: Mgr. Charlie Brown, 
J. Exton, M. Razanka, T. Meade, D.French, B. Ray, D. Culver, M. Thompson, D. Deetch, M?r. D. Wibb. 



of the place athletics has in our educational system. By de- 
fining 'The 'Extra' In Extra-Curricular Sports," Miss Morsink 
does this admirably. 

It is perhaps unusual for an assistant professor of education, 
and former high school social science teacher, who is neither a 
physical educator or accomplished athlete, to show concern 
for the values of participation in sports. However, if interest 
is^n important factor in a person's qualifications to express 
ideas on a subject, then an abiding interest in an affection for 
sports provides adequate reason for expression. 

As a lifelong participant in a multitude of different sports 
activities which have included competitive softball, basketball, 
volleyball, field hockey, badminton, bowling, and golf, this 
writer has known the rewards that can be derived from parti- 
cipation. Destined to "athletic oblivion," there is admittedly 
little to show for the many years of participation— a faded 
high school athletic sweater, a yellowed certificate, one small 
gold medal— no trophies, no publicity filled scrapbook. Me- 
mentos do include several broken fingers, numerous scars, and 
(whenever it is going to rain) achy knees— which wouldn't be 
traded if the memories and benefits acquired from sports par- 
ticipation had to go with them. For it is not the glory, recog- 
nition, or awards that justifies participating in sports. It is the 
"extras" in sports that are the most important and rewarding. 

Change 

One of the extras is release. Sports activities provide a 
means of emancipation from daily routine and pressure. Those 
who participate in sports seldom find life dull. The question, 
"What is there to do?" is unheard. Being on a team or in a 
club, knowing how to play games, or simply to enjoy watch- 
ing them provides a means of using leisure time constructively 
and enjoyably; and there is not a time or season of the year 
when there is not something in sports to absorb one's interest. 

Therapy 

Also, in regards to release, sports provides emotionally 
therapeutic outlets. Taking part in a ballgame, athletic con- 
test, or simply playing catch, is a means to relax, "blow-off 
steam," and escape from daily routine. Sports can be quite a 
tonic to the nervous, tired, and frustrated. Many a student has 
welcomed the chance to practice or play a game in order to 
get away from books and pressures of study. In the heat of a 
sports contest there is no time to dwell on inner personal prob- 
lems. And often, after experiencing physical release through 
sports, other problems can be faced more easily and dealt with 
more effectively. Participation in sports provides release— 
from routine, pressure, and in some instances, oneself. 



Learning 

Another extra derived from sports is the learning which 
comes from participation. Though the learning may not be of 
the conventional sort that derives from books, the learning 
is fundamental and vital. 

Understanding 

One kind of learning in sports is learning about people. 
Most sports participants readily testify that they have met, 
become acquainted with, and developed a greater understand- 
ing of others through sports. Most have discovered that race, 
religion, and socio-economic factors are of little importance 
in measuring the worth of an individual. Students who par- 
ticipate in sports are able to have friends from diverse places 
and backgrounds. College students get the chance to know 
tne students from across campus, and on other campuses. It 
is easy these days to be obscure in a large high school or on a 
college or university campus, but it isn't necessary. Joining and 
taking part in school and campus sports activities is one 
solution. 

Fellowship 

An important corollary of this are the benefits of fellow- 
ship. Certainly, participation in sports provides the mutual ex- 
perience of belonging— to the team, squad, club. It is an im- 
portant and fundamental human need to take part and fit in 
with a group. The inherent informality of sports activities 
creates an atmosphere in which friendships can be more easily 
formed. Many of the friendships last a lifetime, strengthened 
by the fact that they have evolved from the fellowship that 
accompanies sports experiences. 

Travel 

Another kind of learning that can be gained from sports is 
in learning about places. Those who take part in sports have 
been able to travel to other towns, cities, states, and in some 
cases even other countries. In the process of visiting other 
places participants get the opportunity to meet people and 
have new experiences. Inevitably this must lead to a greater 
understanding of others and a broader concept of the world. 
Empathy 

Taking part in sports is also a means of learning how to be 
a better spectator. A person who has been in sports can watch 
others compete with greater understanding. Playing softball is 
a means of understanding what occurs in a World Series, play- 
ing golf gives a person a better appreciation of what a pro- 
fessional golfer experiences in the heat of a sudden-death play- 
off. Anyone who has participated in sports can empathize with 



Page Sixteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1969 



In Stock for 
Immediate Delivery 

First-aid Supplies 



The Sport Shop 



Phone 502 651-5143 



A.B.A. Cold Tablets 

Adhesive Tape 

Alcohol 

Am Caps 

Analgestic Liniment 

Ankle Brace 

Ankle Weights 

Ankle Wraps 

Aspirin 

Athletic Liniment 

Athletic Soap 

Ath-O-Gesic 

Atomic Balm 

Atomic Rub-Down 

Band Aid 

Batter's Rosin 

Bike Tape 

Black Magic 

Body Powder 

Butterfly Tablets 

Carbonate Stick 

Cotton 

Cotton Applicators 

Cramergesic 

Dextrotabs 

Dial-A-Tab 



Dry Smelling Salt 

Elastic Wraps 

Elbow Pads 

Felt 

Firm Grip 

First Aid Kits 

Foam Rubber 

Foot Ointment 

Foot Powder 

Foot Solution 

Fung-o -spray 

Gauze 

Glare Guard 

Instant Ice 

Iso-Quin 

J & J Cream 

J & J Tape 

Kleen Ball 

Knee Braces 

Knee Pads 

Tape 

Tape Remover 

Tongue Depressors 

Towels 

Training Kits 

Tuf-Skin 

Vitamins 




106-1 10 North Race Street 
Glasgow, Kentucky 



Write for 1969-70 school catalogue 



another athlete's problems. They cannot gloat when a rival 
team loses, cannot mock when an athlete fails, cannot laugh 
at a pathetic performance. 

Character 

Perhaps the most important kind of learning that can come 
from sports is the enhancement of one's own character. A per- 
son through athletic experience can learn what is really im- 
portant in terms of the effort and sacrifice they are willing to 
make, the adversity they are willing to suffer, The dedicated 
athlete knows what it is to keep trying in the face of failure 
and defeat. The athlete knows the meaning of the spirit in the 
phrase, "Wait 'til next year!" And those who never know 
stardom, or those who never get to play much, still know they 
would not want to miss being a part of sports. Sports partici- 
pation is a means of learning: how to win with pride, without 
being proud; how to lose with disappointment, yet grace. 

An important element in character development is learning 
to submerge self in the interest of group purpose and goals. 
This phenomenon can be observed on many ball teams and all 
good ones. Sports participants generally come from individual 
reanns of life and aspiration to play on a team for a school or 
club. It is interesting to watch such generally motley groups 
merge and mesh into a single, cooperating, effective unit. 
Every successful team knows the group is more than the sum 
of the individuals that comprise it. By submerging themselves, 
to the extent of concerted effort, team members become more 
as a group, and ultimately, as a result of the experience, more 
as individuals. 

Values Vary 

Sport does not mean the same to everyone, but the values 
that can be derived from participation extend far beyond the 
activity itself, and mean much more than the final score. Some 
time ago a piece in Sports Illustrated magazine eloquently ex- 
pressed the extensive meaning of sport: 

"Nobody has ever been able to say what sport is, quite. But 
life would hardly be the same without it. Perhaps that's be- 
cause sport means a number of opposite things. It means fact 
and rt means fancy. It is as tangible as a frosty morning; ex- 
citing as a photo finish, serene as the ebb tide. It is competi- 



tion; compusure; memory; anticipation. 

"Sport is not all things to all people. But today it is some- 
thing in more different ways to more people than it has ever 
been before. It is what no one has to do and almost everyone 
wants to do. It represents, on the one hand, challenges will- 
ingly accepted— and, on the other, gambits willingly declined. 

"Its colors are as bright as a cardinal's feathers; as soft as mid- 
night on a mountain trail. It is as loud as Yankee Stadium at 
the climax of the World Series— and as quiet as snow. It is exer- 
cise and rest. It is man exuberant and man content. 

"In America today sport is not only a dream that lies over the 
rainbow. It is also an awakening that brings a family together— 
on a boat or beach, skiing weekend or camping trip. 

"Sport is not art or religion, morals or ideals. But with all of 
these it shares values which are at least humanly high and al- 
ways highly human. Sport is a wonderful world." 

There can be and are many reasons for participating in 
sports that go beyond the reasons of physical exercise and ex- 
pression. For many, participation may include a quest for 
alory, but that at best is a rare achievement. And even for 
those few who find it the laurel withers quickly and the 
glory does not last. There is and should be satisfaction and re- 
ward enough in the "extras" in sports to warrant and encour- 
age participation. For in the long range, the extras are really 
not extras at all, but rather benefits which last a lifetime. 
Though a person grows older there is always a sport to enjoy. 
It may be necessary to switch from a basketball to a bowling 
ball and from a football to a golfball, but there is always ex- 
pression, learning, fellowship, and enjoyment. 

Those who are not active in sports need to realize what 
they are missing. Those who are active must be encouraged to 
remain so. Sport should become an integral part of everyone's 
life— for sport truly is a wonderful worldl 



—The Physical Educator 




an 

Wishes for a 
^amtiXev^Jear 

-4- 



^lUe fCUtqden Gomfuuuf general agent 



W. E. KINGSLEY 



121-123 LAFAYETTE AVENUE 
P. O. BOX 7100 



J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. 

Life Departmenf 
LEXINGTON, KY. 40502 



CHARLES C. PRICE 

PHONE 254-4095 





High School Athlete 



CLASS AA STATE CHAMPION ELIZABETHTOWN 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Mgr. Dale Peyton, John Zeitz, Tommy Welch, Jim Berry, Ricky Cas- 
well, John Adams, Dennis Shacklette, Donnie Walters, Ernie Lewis, Chuck Knowles. Second Row: 
Coach Vince Hancock, Coach Hade Durbin, Mgr. Dwight Adcock, Jerome Howard, Bruce Wiley, Carl 
Williams, Doug Barnes, Tommy Kerrick, Larry Jaggers, Bill Bradford, Dennis Taylor, Brad Plant, Gary 
Jenkins, Doug Sexton, Coach John Baird, Coach Ron Myers, Coach Bill Crane. Third Row: Wade John- 
son, Jackie Dupin, Ronald Duren, Johnny Williams, Jim Despain, Jerry Whalen, Garland Carter, Dale 
Aiken, Gary Bennett, William Machatton, John Strange, Chuckie Radcliff, Terry Etherton. Fourth 
Row: Richard Thomas, Knute Haire, Nathan Huggins, Gary Harde, Lloyd Funkhouser, Eugene Now- 
lin, Kevin Doyle, Roy Emrick, Stuart Davis, Mike Harmon, Jim Bates. 



Elizabethtown 33-Meade County 
Elizabethtown 33-Pleasure Ridge Park 
Elizabethtown 41 -Glasgow 
Elizabethtown 38-Shelby County 
Elizabethtown 5 5-North Hardin 8 



Elizabethtown 41-Owensboro Cath. 14 
Elizabethtown 60-Breckinridge Co. 8 
Elizabethtown 35-Oldham County 14 
Elizabethtown 28-LaRue County 
Elizabethtown 36-Ft. Knox 22 



PLAYOFFS 
Elizabethtown 14-Woodford County 
Elizabethtown 26-Mayfield 
Elizabethtown 21 -Bryan Station 8 



Official Organ of tbe 
KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

JANUARY, 1970 



Conference Standings 



Big Eight Conference 



Madisonville-N. Hopkins 


6 










Daviess County 


5 


1 







Owensboro 


4 


2 







Owensboro Cathohc 


3 


3 







Union County 


2 


4 







Henderson County 


1 


5 







Henderson 





6 







Blue Grass Conference 






Say re 


5 










Mercer County 


4 


1 







Burgin 


2 


3 







Berea 


1 


3 







Louisville Country Day 


1 


3 







Mt. Vernon 





3 


1 




Kentucky School for the Deaf 





4 


1 




Central Kentucky Conference 




Woodford County 


7 








24.00 


Stanford 


3 





2 


23.00 


Mt. SterUng 


6 





1 


22;00 


Garrard County 


3 


2 





19.00 


Harrodsburg 


3 


1 


2 


18.75 


Danville 


3 


2 


1 


17.92 


Frankfort 


3 


2 


1 


17.92 


Madison 


3 


4 





17.14 


Henry Clay 


2 


3 





16.00 


Anderson County 


3 


3 





15.00 


Somerset 


1 


3 


1 


13.00 


Jessamine County 





6 


2 


11.88 


Georgetown 





6 





10.00 


Paris 


2 


1 





N.R. 


M.M.I. 





2 





N.R. 


Shelbyville 





3 





N.R. 


Cumberland Valley Conference 




Lynch 


2 





1 




James A. Cawood 


1 


1 


1 




Cumberland 


2 


1 







Evarts 





3 







Eastern Kentucky Mountain Conference 


Belfry 


4 










Hazard 


4 


1 







Jenkins 


4 


1 







Elkhorn City 


4 


1 







Pikeville 


3 


2 







Whitesburg 


2 


4 







Johns Creek 


2 


4 







Wheelwright 


1 


4 







M. C. Napier 


1 


4 







Fleming-Neon 





7 







Mid-State Conference 






Bryan Station 


6 










Clark County 


6 


1 







Harrison County 


4 


2 







Scott County 


3 


1 







Franklin County 


3 


4 







Bourbon County 


2 


5 







Madison Central 


1 


5 







Montgomery County 


2 


7 







North Central Kentucky Conference 




Eminence 


3 










Carroll County 


2 


1 







Henry County 


1 


2 







Owen County 





3 








Simon Kenton 
Ludlow 
Bellevue 
Newport 



6 13.33 

5 12.86 

6 12.50 
8 10.00 



South Kentucky Conference 



Russellville 
Franklin Simpson 
Bowling Green 
Glasgow 





1 

2 

3 



Southern Kentucky Athletic Conference 



Tompkinsville 

Campbellsville 

Caverna 

Glasgow 

Greensburg 

Metcalfe County 



Southeastern Kentucky Conference 



Harlan 
Pineville 
Corbin 
Williamsburg 
Bell County 
Lynn Camp 
Middlesboro 
Knox Central 
London 

Whitley County 
Hazel Green 



26.00 
23.00 
18.50 
18.50 
12.00 
10.00 



30.00 
26.25 
22.50 
18.75 
17.63 
17.17 
16.80 
16.56 
14.75 
13.71 
13.00 



Western Kentucky Athletic Conference 



Mayfield 
Russellville 
Caldwell County 
Paducah Tilghman 
Ft. Campbell 
Trigg County 
Franklin Simpson 
Murray 
Hopkinsville 
North Marshall 
Fulton 

Bowling Green 
Christian County 
Crittenden County 
Lone Oak 



Northeastern Kentucky Conference 



Boyd County 

McKell 

Louisa 

Russell 

Raceland 

Wurtland 

Catlettsburg 



25.71 
25.00 
21.43 
21.00 
20.71 
18.00 
17.86 
16.87 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
14.28 
14.16 
14.16 
14.00 



22.50 
18.75 
17.50 
16.67 
15.00 
12.50 
10.00 



Northern Kentucky Athletic Conference 



Boone County 
Campbell County 
Highlands 
Dixie Heights 
Lloyd 
Dayton 
Beechwood 
Holmes 



25.00 
23.00 
21.00 
19.50 
18.13 
16.25 
15.00 
13.34 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 

Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXX1I-NO. 6 



JANUARY, 1970 



S 1.00 Per Year 



Early Season Basketball Questions 



EDITOR'S NOTE: These interpretations of the rules of 
the National Basketball Committee of the United States and 
Canada do not set aside nor modify any rule. The rulings are 
made by the National Federation of State High School Ath- 
letic Associations in response to situations presented. 

Clifford B. Fagan, Committee Secretary 

1. Play: Al is awarded 2 free throws for being fouled dur- 
ing an unsuccessful try. Just before Al is to be handed the 
ball for his: (a) first free throw; or (b) second free throw, the 
scorer sounds his signal and advises the official that Al is not 
listed in the scorebook. 

Ruling: In both (a) and (b) Al must remain in the game to 
attempt his free throws. His name must be entered in the 
book and he is assessed a technical foul. After he completes 
his free throws any member of team B may attempt the free 
throw for the technical foul on Al. Play is then continued 
with a center jump between any two opponents. 

2. Play: Dribbler Al charges Bl, thereby committing a 
player control foul. Simultaneously, B2 holds A 2. 

Ruling: False double foul. Al is charged with a personal 
foul. Because it is a player control foul, Bl is not awarded a 
free throw(s) for it. A2 is awarded a free throw for the hold- 
ing foul committed by B2. The ball becomes dead following 
the free throw attempt by A2 and play is resumed by a jump 
at center. 

3. Play: After the 4th Quarter expires with the score tied, 
Al is charged with a flagrant technical foul. Either team A or 
B then requests and is granted a time-out. At the expiration 
of the time-out, Bl attempts the first free throw, which is 
either successful or unsuccessful. Following the free throw, 
either team A or B requests and is granted a time-out. 

Ruling: Legal. The second time-out i". not considered to 
be immediately following the first time-out because the ball 
has become alive between the two time-out periods. 

4. Play: After he has ended his dribble, Al jumps into the 
air and tries for a field goal. The try is short and Al, who fol- 
lows in on his own attempt, catches the ball beneath the bas- 
ket, then again jumps into the air and throws the ball through 
a basket. 

Ruling: A legal goal. Al and his team lost control of the 
bass when he made a bona fide field goal attempt. When Al 
retrieved his attempt, he reestablished team control for team 
control for team A and his second try is legal. 

5. Play: Al, in a post player position in the scoring area of 
his front court, is closely guarded by Bl. He has not dribbled. 
After he has been closely guarded for a 4-second count, Al 
tosses the ball from his right hand to his left hand. 

Ruling: Al has dribbled, therefore, the closely guarded 
count has been broken. It will be restarted when Al holds the 
ball in his left hand while being closely guarded. 

6. Play: Before the ball is made available to Al for a free 
throw attempt, B3 takes a position in the fourth free throw 
lane space. B3 is in this position at the time the ball is made 
available to A 1. After A 1 has the ball, B3 moves backward out 
of his space. 

Ruling: B3 has committed a violation. 

Comment: Restrictions apply to the spaces all along the 
free throw lane, as well as on the semi-circle which is directly 
behind the free throw line. 



7. Play: B is awarded the ball out of bounds for a throw- 
in. B stands and holds the ball for three seconds when A calls 
for a time- out. 

Ruling: A should be granted a time-out because change of 
status is not about to occur. 

8. Play: "^4 gets defensive rebound and excessively swings 
arms and elbows. During the swinging, he contacts A3. The 
foul is neither flagrant nor intentional. 

Ruling: Player control foul. Ball is awarded to A at nearest 
spot for throw-in. 

9. Play: Throw-in by Al from his free throw line extended 
is touched (not controlled) by A2, who is in A's mid-court 
area. After A2 has touched the pass, it goes into the back 
court, where A2 successfully gains control of it. 

Ruling: There has been no violation. 

10. Play: Al is disqualified by being charged with his fifth 
personal foul. During the one minute available to Team A to 
replace Al, the coach of Team A leaves his bench and goes to 
the sideline to give the team instructions. 

Ruling: There is no infraction of the rules. Provided by 
10-9 "coaches shall remain seated on the bench except, while 
the clock is stopped, they may leave the bench to directly 
encourage players who are on the court." Should, however, 
players of Team A, except disqualified Al, leave the floor, 
there would be an infraction. 

11. Play: Team B requests time-out while Al is in pos- 
session of the ball. The referee erroneously grants the time- 
out. The official, immediately after granting the time-out, 
realizes he has made an error. 

Ruling: Team B is entitled to the time-out and the time- 
out is charged to it. All privileges and rights permitted a team 
during a charged time-out are available to both Team A and 
Team B. 

12. Play: Al scores a legal goal. A2 quickly secures the 
ball and throws to A3 who immediately scores. The official 
readily realizes what has happened. 

Ruling: In these circumstances the official will be correct 
in disallowing the goal by A3 and awarding ball to Team B 
out of bounds at the end of the court, where Al scored. If 
the official believes that the action of A 2 was intentional, it 
should be ruled as unsportsmanlike action and official, would 
assess A2 with a technical foul. 

Comment: If, in the above play situation, there has been 
an appreciable length of play, such as 8 to 10 seconds, fol- 
lowing the throw-in by A2 and then A3 scores, after which 
the mistake is detected, the goal by A3 would count. 

13. Play: Team A has the ball out of bounds for a throw- 
in. A2 is in the front court. Al passes the ball to A2, who, 
while the pass is in flight, leaps into the air from the front 
court, catches the ball while he is in the air, and then comes 
to the floor in the back court without traveling. 

Ruling: This is a violation. A 2 has caused the ball to go 
from the front court to the back court. 

Comment: As provided by 4-17, A2 has jumped from the 
front court. When he touches the ball, it becomes alive in- 
stantaneously. A2 takes it from the front court to the back 
court. This statement is in no way in conflict with Comment 
201A in the current issue of the Basketball Case Book. The 

(Continued on Page Ten) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1970 



JANUARY, 1970 VOL. XXXJI-NO. 6 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 40501 

Second class postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Ralph C. Dorsey (1966-70), Horse Cave 

Vice-President . . . Foster J. Sanders ( 1966-70), Louisville 
Du-ectors-MortonCombs(1968-72),Carr Creek; W. H. Crow- 
dus (1968-71), Franklin; Don Davis (1967-71), Independ- 
ence; James T. Dotson (1968-72), Pikeville, Lee T. Mills 
(1969-73), Frankfort; Richard Vincent (1969-73), Morgan- 



field. 



Subscription Rate $1.00 per Year 



Y %om 



the Ci 



ommtssionet s 



Offi 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1969 Football Participation List 

2. School's Report on Football Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Football) 



Approved and Certified Officials 

A large number of K.H.S.A.A. registered officials quali- 
fied for the advanced rating of Approved and Certified as a 
result of the National Federation basketball examination 
which was given in Kentucky on December 1, 1969. Only 
officials receiving these higher ratings are eligible to work in 
the district and regional tournaments. Only Certified officials 
are eligible to work in the State Tournament. 

Basketball officials who qualified for advanced ratings dur- 
ing the current season are as follows: 

CERTIFIED OFFICIALS 



Alexander. Rex 
Allen, Nelson R. 
Anders, Raleigh 
Bell, Clarence T. 
Blevins, Boone 
Boyles, Paul 
Brashear, Loy Ray 
Brock, Alben 
Brock, John H. 
Brown, Billy C. 
Brown, E. C. 

Brown, John W. "Scoop" 
Browning, Earl E. 
Brizendine, Vic 
Bruner, Jack C. 
Buis, Nathaniel A. 
Burch, Bill 
Burke, Harry R. 
Butcher, Douglas 
Butcher, Granville "Bo" 
Butler, Robert D. 
Butner, Billy M. 
Caldwell, James 
Cariberg, John H. 
Cisco, Robert N. 
Clemmons, Sam 
Collins, Hubert 
Combs, Keith A. 
Conley, Ted L. 
Cooksey, Marvin 
Cravens, Robert L. 
Croft, Lewis E. 
Culp, Ronald D. 
Dame, L. J. 
Daniel, Roger T. 



Davis, Harold T. 
Davis, Ralph E. 
DeVary, Bill 
Disken, James W. 
Dobson, Kenneth 
Dorsey. Lames 
Dotson, John B. 
Drake, Richard R. 
Driskell, Earl, Jr. 
Duerson, Wm. R. 
Duff, Earl 
Durbin, Hade, Jr. 
Duvall, Thomas J., Sr. 
Eades, James M. 
Elliott, Carroll L. 
Farley, Jimmy 
Finley, Albert 
Flynn, Bobby 
Foster, Bob 
Fraley, Bill J. 
Freese, Oliver T. 
Fritz, Sherman 
Fuller John R., Jr. 
Gaither, Gene 
Gardner, Howard E. 
Gettler, John F. 
Gibson, Fred W. 
Gilbert, Gerald L. 
Golden, Billy Joe 
Goley, James E. 
Goodman, Jack 
Gour, Bob 
Hamm, Gerald A. 
Hammons, Norman 
Hardin, Don G. 



Harned, Victor C. 
Harper, Randall H. 
Harper, Robie 
Harris, Billy 
Harrison, John L. 
Hewitt, R. T. 
Hill, Earl F. 
Hinton, Henry E., Jr. 
Hofstetter, Joe 
Holt, Robert E. 
Holthouser, Ora L. 
Horsman, Bill 
Hubbs, Cletus L., Jr. 
Hunley, Neil P. 
Johnson, Harry B. 
Johnson, James M. 
Johnson, Ronald L. 
Johnson, Walter 
Johnson, Wm. Bernard 
Jones, Frank 
Kelly, Charles R. 
Kimmel, Jerry 
King, Jim 
Knight, Bill 
Kuhl, Lawrence 
Laubheimer, Donald T. 
Lawson, Rondell 
Lile, Clyde F. 
List, Frank A. 
Long, Bill 
Louden, Hubert 
Loudy, Kenneth 
Lowe, Gene T. 
Lowe, James D., Jr. 
Lusby, George H. 
McCargo, Frank 
McClure, W. S. 
McCoy, Hayse 
McGehee, G. K. 
McLane, Albert I. 
Madon, Robert L. 
Maines, George 
May.E. B.,Jr. 
Meade, Foster "Sid" 
Meredith, Denny 
Metzger, Don 
Miller, Bob 
Miller, Ferrel 
Miller, Rex J. 
Montgomery, Chester 
Moore, Robert 
Morgan, Richard 
Morse, Richard K. 
Moser, Rudy C. 
Murrell, Allen L. 
Newman, Larry G. 
Omer, Harold G. 
O'Nan, Norman 
Padgett, R. K. 
Parrott, Lanny L. 
Peay, Curtis 
Peeno, Harry R. 
Perry, James E. 



Phelps, Ralph "Rudy" 

Ramey. Herb 

Redman. Melvin Paul 

Reed, Charles R. 

Reed, Gordon 

Rees, Gayle H. 

Reinhardt, Myron 

Rexroat, Jerry L. 

Ricketts, C. O. 

Ring, William H. 

Rister, Edgar L. 

Ritter, Goebel 

Roe, Doyle "Buddy" 

Roesel, Joseph F. 

Rogers, Howard 

Roller, Otis 

Runyon, Tommy Dean 

Russell, Allen W. 

SLClair. Robert L., Jr. 

Salver Henry E. 

Selvy, curt 

Shaw, Earl 

Shuck, Thomas G. 

Simpson, Fred C. 

Sims, Frank D. 

Singleton, Bobby L. 

Small, Bill 

Smith, Wayne N. 

Smith, WUlard N. 

Smith, William E. 
Smith, Wyatt Jack 
Spencer, Irvin E. 
Steenken, William R. 
Stephenson, Harry S. 
Stiff, Maurice 
StLkeleather, Clyde L. 
Stoess, Henry L. 
Strain, Richard 
Strong, Arnett 
Sullivan, Don C. 
Sumner, Carl 
Taylor, Ed 

Thompson, Thomas A. 
Tinsley, Marion R. 
Triplett, Herbert W. 
Urlage, Richard 
Van Zant, Jim 
Vescovi, Raymond B. 
Vipperman, Albert E. 
Waller, Bob 
Weaver. Ray 
Weiner, Dick 
Wesche, James A. 
White, David B. 
Williams, Roger 
Williams. J5. Jack 
Winchester, Roy L. 

Winfrey, Shelby 
Wirtz, Howard 
Wise, Jack 
Woods, Gene 
Wright, James L. 



APPROVED OFFICIALS 



Adams, James C. 
Bates, John R. 
Biter, Charles D. 
Blackwood, Thomas W. 
Bleidt, John J. 
Burd, Robert T. 
Calitri-Don 
Canady, Ray 
Caple, Harold 



Cariberg, Ralph C. 
Cash, Charles C. 
Chiles, Marion 
Clark, David L. 
Cleavenger, Ed. 
Cloud, Ralph L. 
Cochran, Roy D. 
Coffey, Robert A. 
Collier, Bumard 



(Continued on Page Eight) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1970 



Page Three 



School 



D. 1 



1969-70 MEMBERSHIP IN THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 
Address Tel. No. Principal Coach 

REGION 1 



D. 2 



D 3 



D 4 



D. 5 



D. 6 



D. 7 



D. 8 



D. 9 



D. 10 



Carlisle County 


Bardwell 


628-5411 


Burley R. Mathis 


Tommy Buchanan 


Fulton 


Fulton 


472-1741 


Bobby Snider 


Larry Shanks 


Fulton County 


Hickman 


236-3' 91 


Bobby Childers 


Charles Murphy 


Hickman County 


Clinton 


653-St61 


James H. Phillips 


David King 


Ballard Memorial 


Barlow 


665-5151 


Bob Buchanan 


Dale Ray 


Heath 


W. Paducah 


488-3126 


Larry Powell 


Frank Wright 


Lone Oak 


Paducah 


554-1820 


Glenn E. Dexter 


Jack McKinney 


Paducah Tilghman 


Paducah 


443-6296 


James Traylor 


Berny Miller 


Reidland 


Paducah 


898-2441 


Benjamin Sydboten 


Don Rudolph 


St. Mary 


Paducah 


442-1681 


Bro. Bede Keller 


Dennis Gourley 


Cuba 


Mayfield 


382-3400 


W. W. Chumbler 


Edward L. Ford 


Fancy Farm 


Fancy Farm 


623-4349 


Jimmy C. Wiggins 


Dennis Pilcher 


Farmington 


Farmington 


345-2171 


James A. Baker 


Joe Mikez 


Lowes 


Lowes 


674-5333 


Charles Hamlin 


Scott Schlosser 


Mayfield 


Mayfield 


247-4461 


Baikley Jones 


Don Sparks 


Sedalia 


Sedalia 


328-8256 


James A. Pickard 


Ken Wray 


Symsonia 


Symsonia 


851-3231 


Cecil Reid 


Donald Butler 


Wingo 


Wingo 


376-2236 


C. W. Jones 


Bill T. Owen 


Benton 


Benton 


527-9091 


Bobby G. Miller 


Joe Warren 


Calloway County 


Murray 


75 3-5479 


Howard Crittenden 


Roy Cothran 


Murray 


Murray 


753-5202 


Eli Alexander 


Bobby Toon 


Murray Univ. 


Murray 


762-2296 


Vernon E. Shown 




North Marshall 


Calvert City 


395-4407 


Barney Thweatt 


Howard Gray 


South Marshall 


Benton 


527-2891 


William A. Cothran 


Charley Lampley 






REGION 2 




Caldwell County 


Princeton 


365-3531 


Joseph Clark 


Joe Mack Hill 


Crittenden County 


Marion 


965-2248 


Lorenza D. Davis 


George Whitecotton 


Fredonia 


Fredonia 


545-3431 


Riley Denington 


Robert Hooks 


Livingston Central 


Burna 


988-3263 


Kenneth T. Hardin 


Don Ringstaff 


Lyon County 


Eddyville 


388-2296 


Lige Shadowen 


James Ringstaff 


Trigg County 


Cadiz 


522-6653 


Arnold S. Oaken 


Jim Wallace 


Henderson 


Henderson 


826-9568 


William H. V/omack 


Robert Rogers 


Henderson County 


Henderson 


827-2506 


N. D. Barra 


Marion Hill 


Holy Name 


Henderson 


826-6031 


J. Francis Powers 


John M. Werner 


Providence 


Providence 


667-2411 


Thomas W. Johnson 


Philip D. Back 


Union County 


Morgan field 


389-1454 


Richard Vincent 


Steve Cunningham 


Webster County 


Dixon 


639-2651 


Hugh E. Sellers 


Paul Watts 


Earlington 


Earlington 


383-5511 


Lester Mimms 


David Jenkins 


Madisonville- 










North Hopkins 


Madisonville 


821-8503 


Floyd Brown 


Don Parsons 


South Hopkins 


Nortonville 


676-3443 


David Siria 


James Beshears 


West Hopkins 


Nebo 


249-3151 


A. O. Richards 


Gary Morgan 


Christian County 


Hopkinsville 


886-4463 


Neal R. Tucker 


Harlan Peden 


Dawson Springs 


Dawson Springs 


797-3811 


Paul B. Stevens 


Norman Weaver 


Fort Campbell 


Fort Campbell 


798-2645 


Bill R. Perry 


Roy Medlock 


Hopkinsville 


Hopkinsville 


886-3384 


Mac Arthur 


Roy Woolum 


Todd Co. Central 


Elkton 


265-2506 


Andrew Renick 


John R. Camp 






REGION 3 




Calhoun 


Calhoun 


273-3264 


Caliborne Moore 


Bill Warren 


Daviess County 


Owensboro 


684-5285 


W. P. Wheeler 


Randy Embry 


Livermore 


Livermore 


278-2522 


William D. Snodgrass 


Tom Hobgood 


Owen )oro 


Owensboro 


684-7221 


Joe O. Brown 


Robert Watson 


Owensboro Catholic 


Owensboro 


684-3215 


Rev. Henry O'Bryan 


Mike Grebe 


Sacramento 


Sacramento 


736-2343 


Roy D. Withrow 


Steve Hays 


Trinity 


Whitesville 


233-5533 


Sr. Lenora 


Bryce Roberts 


Bremen 


Bremen 


525-3411 


Paul Phillips 


Randy Swann 


Central City 


Central City 


754-2272 


Delmas Giih 


Jackie Day 


Drakesboro 


Drakesboro 


476-8411 


W. J. Wilcutt 


Robie Harper 


Graham 


Graham 


338-1317 


L. A. Wells 


Joe Thomas 


Greenville 


Greenville 


338-4650 


J. Ernest Atkins 


Jerry V. Shanks 


Hughes-Kirk 


Beechmont 


476-2204 


Charles Eades 


Eugene Pardue 


Muhlenberg Central 


Powderly 


338-3550 


Lyle C. Baugh 


Tommy Stovall 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1970 



School 
D. 11 



D. 12 



Breckinridge County 
FordsviUe 
Frederick F raize 
Hancock County 
Ohio County 
St. Romuald 
Butler County 
Caneyville 
Clarkson 

Edmonson County 
Leitchfield 



Address 

Harned 

Fordsville 

Cloverport 

Lewisport 

Hartford 

Hardinsburg 

Morgantown 

Caneyville 

Clarkson 

Brownsville 

Leitchfield 



Tel. No. Principal 



756-2149 
276-3601 
788-3388 
927-6712 
274-3366 
756-5504 
526-3753 
879-4211 
242-3061 
597-2932 
259-4175 



Reathal Goff 
Noble Midkiff 
R. O. Bernard 
Clifton Banks, Jr. 
Shelby C. Forsythe 
Sr. Helen Marie 
Dairell C. Hampton 
Ramon Majors 
James R. Woosley 
Roy James 
John H. Taylor 



Coach 

Tom Davis 
Donald Coppage 
Ed Belcher 
Denzel Mefford 
Ralph Underhill 
Scott Willoughby 
Sonny Fentress 
BUI Lee 

Bowan Davenport 
Pete Clemmons 
Cecil Goff 



REGION 4 



D. 13 



D. 14 



D. 15 



D. 16 



Adairville 

Auburn 

Chandler's Chapel 

Lewisburg 

Olmstead 

Russellville 

Bowling Green 

Franklin-Simpson 

University 

Warren Central 

Wairen East 

Allen County 

Austin Tracy 

Glasgow 

Hiseviile 

Park City 

ScottsviJJe 

Temple Hill 

Clinton County 

Cumberland County 

Gamaliel 

Metcalfe County 

Tompkinsville 



Adairville 

Auburn 

Auburn 

Lewisburg 

Olmstead 

Russellville 

Bowling Green 

Franklin 

Bowling Green 

Bowling Green 

Bowling Green 

ScottsviUe 

Lucas 

Glasgow 

Hiseviile 

Park City 

ScottsviJJe 

Glasgow 

Albany 

Burkesville 

Gamaliel 

Edmonton 

Tompkinsville 



539-7711 
542-4181 
542-4139 
755-6191 
734-4621 
726-6434 
842-1674 
586-3273 
745-3852 
842-7302 
781-1277 
237-3751 
434-2911 
651-8801 
453-2611 
749-2665 
237-3751 
427-2611 
387-5569 
864-3451 
457-2341 
432-2481 
487-6217 



Jesse L. Richards 
Tom Garrett 
Morris Shelton 
Bill McKinney 
JohnW. McCarley 
R. D. Reynolds 
Chester Redmon 
Don Stephenson 
James A. Carpenter 
Henry E. Resch 
Kenneth Harvey 
Raymond Barber 
G. R. Helm 
Eldon J. Smith 
F P. Newberry 
Arthur Reynolds 
Bruce Stewart 
James C. Coomer 
Perry C. Hay 
Edwin R. Hopper 
Edwin Steen 
Howard B. Keel 
Randall Grider 



Tommy Cummings 
Howard Gorrell 
Ivan G. Pogue 
Bob Birdwhistell 
James B. Milam 
Wayne Mullen 
Larry Doughty 
Frank Cardwell 
Charles R. Strasburger 
Lowell Hammers 
William Cate 
Tommy Long 
William Reece 
Tommy Downing 
Bob Sturgeon 
Darrell Florence 
Lyle Dunbar 
Jim E. Lindsey 
Lindle Castle 
Larry McDonald 
Jerome Taylor 
Russell VanZant 
Prentice Stanford 



REGION 5 



D. 17 



D. 18 



D. 19 



D. 20 



D. 21 



D. 22 



East Hardin 
Elizabethtown 
Fort Knox 
Meade County 
North Hardin 
West Hardin 
Caverna 
Greensburg 
LaRue County 
Hart County 
Bardstown 
Nelson County 
St. Catherine 
Washington County 
Adair County 
Campbellsville 
Lebanon 
St. Augustine 
St. Charles 
Taylor County 



Central 

Flaget 

Loretto 

Portland Christian 

Shawnee 

Angela Menci 

Bishop David 

Butler 



Glendale 

Elizabethtown 

Fort Knox 

Brandenburg 

Radcliff 

Stephensburg 

Horse Cave 

Greensburg 

Hodgenville 

Munfordville 

Bardstown 

Bardstown 

New Haven 

Springfield 

Columbia 

Campbellsville 

Lebanon 

Lebanon 

Lebanon 

Campbellsville 



Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 



854-2300 
765-5237 
624-6647 
422-3214 
351-3165 
862-3924 
773-7951 
932-5231 
358-3195 
524-9341 
348-5913 
348-9046 
549-3194 
336-3718 
384-2751 
465-8774 
692-3441 
692-2063 
692-4578 
465-4431 



Don Cothran 
Paul E. Kerrick 
Robert B. Burrow 
David T. Wilson 
Ray Story 
Kenneth Riddle 
Tom Hunt 
Eugene E. Tate 
Robert E. Brown 
Kenneth B. Sidwell 
John H. Branson 
T. G. Florence 
Sr. Jamesina Spain 
Robert L. Robertson 
J. T. Coomer 
Richard L. Bower 
C. C. Banister 
Sr. Katherine Misbauer 
Sr. Mary C. Sherron 
Edward L. Cox 



REGION 6 



584-6193 
778-55 28 
778-2122 
778-6114 
774-2353 
447-5911 
447-3442 
448-4620 



J. W. Hackett 
Bro. Kirby 
Sr. Pauline Marie 
Earl Muliins, Sr. 
George E. Sauer 
Sr. Eileen Carney 
Bro. Charles Blavat 
H. L. Hatfield 



Don Morris 
Charles Rawlings 
Walter Grabruck 
James Lambert 
Bennie Keen 
Bill Jones 
Jim Taylor 
Carl Deaton 
Larry Pursiful 
Kenneth Metcalf 
Garnis Martin 
Ernest Ruby 
Bobby G. Chowning 
Dan Richards 
George Critz 
Obie Coomer 
Pat Tully 
Michael Delaney 
Edward L. Anderson 
Billy B. Smith 



Robert Graves 
T. Finnegan 
Jean Daugherty 
Eugene Schreiner 
Robert Atkinson 
Betty Dwyer 
Leo Tiemey 
Lonnie Willoughby 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1970 



Page Five 



School Address 

Pleasure Ridge Pk. Louisville 

Western Louisville 

Doss Louisville 

Fairdale Fairdale 

Holy Rosary Academy Louisville 



D. 23 



>. 24 



Jesse Stuart 
Valley Station 
DeSales 
Iroquois 
Southern 
Thomas Jefferson 



Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 



Tel. No. Principal 



935-5464 
447-3221 
935-2948 
366-1468 
361-2213 
935-3155 
937-2300 
368-6519 
366-0373 
969-1331 
969-2841 



Bobby Green 
John D. Brown 
J. S. Pittenger 
Harry K. Hardin 
Sr. Anne Regis 
Denzil J. Ramsey 
J. C. Cantrell 
Rev. Murray Phelan 
Edwin K. Binford 
T. T. Knight 
W. D. Bruce, Jr. 



Coach 

Gary Schaffer 
Leonard Brown 
John S. Hosbach 
Forest Able 
Martha E. Brown 
Neal Harding 
Bobby S. Pace 
Clyde Smith 
Faurest Coogle 
William Kidd 
John Reuther 



REGION 7 



>, 25 



D. 26 



D. 27 



D. 28 



D. 29 



D. 30 



D. 31 



D. 32 



D. 33 



Aniens Trade 

DuPont Manual 

Ky. School for Blind 

Louisville Col. Sch. 

Louisville Male 

Mercy Academy 

Presentation Acad. 

Ursuline Academy 

St. Xavier 

Atherton 

Kentucky Home 

Louisville Cty. Day 

Sacred Heart Acad. 

Seneca 

Trinity 

Durrett 

Fern Creek 

Jeffersontown 

Marion C. Moore 

Assumption 

Ballard 

Eastern 

Ky. Military Inst. 

St. Thomas Seminary 

Waggener 

Westport 



Lebanon Junction 
Mt. Washington 
Shepherdsville 
Taylorsville 
Eminence 
Henry County 
Lincoln School 
Shelby County 
Shelbyville 
Carroll County 
Gallatin County 
Oldham County 
Trimble County 
Georgetown 
Grant County 
Owen County 
Scott County 
Williamstown 



Boone County 
Dixie Heights 
Lloyd 
St. Henry 
Simon Kenton 
Walton-Verona 



Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 



Lebanon Junction 

Mt. Washington 

Shepherdsville 

Taylorsville 

Eminence 

New Castle 

Simpsonville 

Shelbyville 

Shelbyville 

Carrollton 

Warsaw 

LaGrange 

Bedford 

Georgetown 

Dry Ridge 

Owenton 

Georgetown 

Williamstown 



Florence 

Ft. Mitchell 

Erlanger 

Erlanger 

Independence 

Walton 



583-9711 
637-1361 
897-1583 
451-5330 
582-2613 
584-5589 
583-5935 
587-1717 
636-2525 
459-3610 
452-2163 
895-3452 
897-1811 
451-4330 
895-6765 
368-5831 
239-3267 
267-7486 
964-3376 
458-9551 
425-5076 
245-4161 
425-7901 
425-5440 
895-0567 
425-2541 



Byron H. Bell 
Arthur J. Ries 
William F. Davis 
Nancy E. Kussrow 
Foster J. Sanders 
Sr. Mary Prisca 
Sr. Sheila Ann 
Sr. M. Laurene 
Bro. Conrad Callahan 
Russell Garth 
Alwyn Dickerson 
John Gernert 
Sr. Benedicts O'Connor 
W. O. Wilson 
Rev. David Hazelip 
Johnnie Lee 
J. V. Reschar 
William Reynolds 
William Klapheke 
Sr. M. Corinne 
Patrick Crawford 
John W. Trapp 
N. C. Hodgin 
John J. Butler 
Arthur K. Draut 
James O. Gatewood 



REGION 8 



833-4626 
538-4227 
543-7614 
477-2230 
845-4071 
346-8421 
722-8863 
633-2344 
633-4869 
732-5215 
567-5041 
279-5269 
255-3268 
863-3805 
824-4433 
484-5509 
863-2640 
824-4421 



Marvin F. Stewart 
Leon Remington 
Roger A. Phelps 
L. W. Mullins 
Ora Watts 
Don M. Turner 
Samuel Robinson 
Bruce Sweeney 
Walt Green 
James B. Edwards 
James C. Wilson 
Ray Hammers 
Charles W. Scott 
Jack Williams. 
Ervin B. Pack 
Cyrus E. Greene 
Ed Sams 
Carl A. Collins 



REGION 9 



371-6020 
341-7650 
341-7530 
341-9309 
356-3541 
485-4293 



C. R. Norman 
Arthur J. Walsh 
David Whaley 
Sr. Joseph Marie 
Robert Barnes 
Billy E. Prewitt 



Joseph E. Smith 
Mike Pollio 



Jim Huter 
Kenwyn Boyle 
Vivian Dunlevy 
Theresa Kelty 
Joseph Reibel 
Gene Minton 
Jane M. Allen 
KentMcCubbin 
Pat Lally 
George Unseld 
Bob Schmidt 
Adrian Cooksey 
Hugh Gabbard 
Jack Haury 
Gene F. Carroll 
Sr. Theresa Marie 
Richard Schmidt 
Ralph Guess 
Frank M. Booth 
J. Kevin Isert 
David Leyerle 
Ray Noe 



Glenn B. Smith 
Ray Foster 
Tom Collins 
Larry Cheek 
J. T. Stinson 
Craynor Slone 
Ernon Simpson 
Mitchell Bailey 
Evan Settle 
Bill Fultz 
Walker Belcher 
Bob Simpson 
Roger Cordell 
Wayne Atkins 
C. R. Wenderoth 
Cecil Todd 
J. W. Ballaid 
Patrick Jenkins 



Sam Kan 
William Jones 
Charles Perry 
William Code 
Joe Stark 
Morris R. Tyler 






Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1970 



School 
D. 34 



D. 35 



D. 36 



Beechwood 

Covington Catholic 

Covington Latin 

Holmes 

Holy Cross 

Ludlow 

Notre Dame Acad. 

Villa Madonna Acad. 

Bellevue 

Dayton 

Newport 

Newport Catholic 

Bishop Brossart 

Campbell County 

Highlands 

St. Thomas 

Silver Grove 



Address 

Ft. Mitchell 

Covington 

Covington 

Covington 

Covington 

Ludlow 

Covington 

Covington 

Bellevue 

Dayton 

Newport 

Newport 

Alexandria 

Alexandria 

Ft. Thomas 

Ft. Thomas 

Silver Grove 



Tel. No. Principal 



311-1220 
431-5351 
291-7044 
431-3604 
431-1335 
261-8211 
261-4300 
261-3441 
261-2980 
261-4357 
431-0064 
441-7100 
635-2108 
635-2191 
441-1301 
441-2211 
441-3873 



Harold Williams 
Michael Trainor 
Rev. Paul Arbogast 
Richard A. Williams 
Robert Mark 
Dan L. Sullivan 
Sr. Mary Honora 
Sr. M. Clarita 
William Armstrong 
Thomas W. Daley 
Edwin K. Burton 
Bro. Ken Pfister 
Rev. Joseph Minogue 
Lawrence Kinney 
John Deering 
Sr. Judith 
Robert Dozier 



Coach 

Dick Maile 
MoteHils 
Rev. Edwin Heile 
Fred Moeves 
George Schneider 
Paul Kroth 

Mary L. Elgrim 
John Gross 
Tom Hood 
Bob Vanderpool 
Ron Albrinck 
Don Fangman 
Ken Lehkamp 
Jim Bradbury 
Ken Shields 
Richard Morris 



REGION 10 



D. 37 



D. 38 



D. 39 



D. 40 



Bourbon County 

Harrison County 

Millersburg Mil. 

Nicholas County 

Paris 

Augusta 

Bracken County 

Deming 

Pendleton 

Fleming County 

Lewis County 

Mason County 

Maysville 

St. Patrick 

Tollesboro 

Bath County 

George Rogers Clark 

Montgomery County 

Mt. Sterling 



Paris 

Cynthiana 

Millersburg 

Carlisle 

Paris 

Augusta 

Brooksville 

Mt. Olivet 

Falmouth 

Flemingsburg 

Vanceburg 

Maysville 

Maysville 

Maysville 

Tollesboro 

Owingsville 

Winchester 

Mt. Sterling 

Mt. Sterling 



987-2550 
234-3254 
484-3352 
289-5584 
987-4545 
256-4282 
735-3891 
724-2700 
654-3355 
845-6601 
796-2823 
564-6409 
564-3856 
564-5329 
798-2541 
674-6325 
744-6111 
498-2250 
498-3484 



Jack Clifford 
William Doan 
Joseph R. Johnson 
Donald G. Elder 
Bob Anderson 
Alice Kate Field 
Jar-vis Parsley 
H. O. Hale 
Terry Cummins 
Maitin Marlar 
Douglas Applegate 
Elza Whalen, Jr. 
Robert L. Hellard 
Sr. M. Jude Buck 
Charles M. Hughes 
Charles Gilley 
Robert D. Campbell 
Calvin Hunt 
Winston Hamilton 



BUI Case 
Jerry Jenkins 
Jim Minchow 
Billy K. Anderson 
Earl Redwine 
Joseph Mahan 
David Hamilton 
William Leet 
Phillip Wood 
Robert Hall 
Donnie Gaunce 
Jim Mitchell 
Tom Creamer 
Bill Forman 
Alan Bane 
Julian Cunningham 
Thomas Goebel 
Lonnie Davis 
Don Lane 



REGION 1 1 



D. 41 



D. 42 



D. 43 



D. 44 



D. 45 



Frankfort 
Franklin County 
Good Shepherd 
Margaret Hall 
Woodford County 
Anderson County 
Burgin 
Haxrodsburg 
Jessamine County 
Mercer County 
Western 
Bryan Station 
Henry Clay 
Lafayette 

Lexington Catholic 
Sayre 

Tates Creek 
Berea Community 
Estill County 
Irvine 
Madison 
Madison Central 
Model Laboratory 



Boyle County 
C'ab Orchard 
Danville 
Garrard County 



Frankfort 

Frankfort 

Frankfort 

Versailles 

Versailles 

Lawrenceburg 

Burgin 

Harrodsburg 

Nicholasville 

Harrodsburg 

Sinai 

Lexington 

Lexington 

Lexington 

Lexington 

Lexington 

Lexington 

Berea 

Irvine 

Irvine 

Richmond 

RjrhmnnH 

Richmond 



Danville 
Crab Orchard 
Dam ille 
Lancaster 



223-8030 
227-2236 
223-5041 
873-3751 
873-5434 
839-3431 
748-5170 
734-3242 
885-4849 
734-4195 
839-3608 
299-4027 
255-5581 
277-5122 
277-4775 
254-1361 
272-1513 
986-4911 
723-3537 
723-3616 
623-4959 
623-1530 
622-2986 



O. C. Leathers 
Robert W. Hoagland 
Sr. Rose Francis 
Rev. CoUey W. Bell 
Charles O. Dawson 
Bill Rideout 
L. B. Oliver 
L. D. Knight 
Zeb Blankenship 
Kenneth King 
Robert B. Turner 
R. L. Grider 
Clyde Lassiter 
J. Lloyd Smith 
Rev. Robert Nieberding 
Donn Hollingsworth 
A. C. Thomas 
William J. Riffe 
Paul Hughes 
Joe Ohr 
John H. Brock 
James B. Moore 
David Gover 



REGION 12 

236-5047 Roy R. Camic 

355-2331 Tom Blankenship 

236-6373 James McAfee 

792-2147 Johnnie R. Laswell 



Rex Pitts 
John Lykins 
Ronald Barbour 

Ed Allin 
Jack Upchurch 
Bruce Johnson 
Gilbert Samples 
Bill Fryman 
Steve Clevenger 
Lairy A. Gritton 
Bob Barlow 
Al Prewitt 
Russ Day 
Harry T. S tarns 
Gerald Walton 
Louis Stout 
Bill Walton 
Charles Hayslip 
Elwood Daugherty 
Ray Vencill 
Don Richardson 
Shirley Kearns 



Gerald Sinclair 
Gene Middleton 
David Cottrell 
Dale Moore 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1970 



Page Seven 



School 




Address 


Tel. No. 


Principal 


Coach 




Hustonville 


Hustonville 


348-3831 


Cecil Purdom 


Albert Wall 




Ky. Sch. for Deaf 


Danville 


236-5132 


Winfield McChord, Jr. 


Edward Hyden 




McKinney 


McKinney 


346-2101 


M. C. Montgomery 


Mike Candler 




Memorial 


Waynesburg 


365-7018 


Lester Mulhns 


Jim Reynolds 




Stanford 


Stanford 


365-2191 


Norman McGuffey 


Jim Baird 


D. 46 


Casey County 


Liberty 


787-6151 


Nathaniel Buis 


Robert Payne 




Monticello 


Monticello 


348-4681 


Eldon Davidson 


Joe W. Harper 




Russell County 


Russell Springs 


866-2545 


Ron Chumbley 


Alien Feldhaus 




Wayne County 


Monticello 


348-3311 


A. J. Lloyd 


Sherman York 


D. 47 


Burnside 


Burnside 


561-4250 


Collas Simpson 


Earl Hicks 




Eubank 


Eubank 


379-4661 


Harold C. Carter 


Denton Ping 




McCreary County 


Whitley City 


376-2213 


Eddie L. Brown 


Charles Eckler 




Nancy 


Nancy 


678-4942 


Kenneth Ashley 


Ernest R. Ramsey 




Pine Knot 


Pine Knot 


354-2511 


Carlos F. Lester 


Mike Chaney 




Pulaski County 


Somerset 


679-1574 


Garva G. Wilson 


Bill Mauney 




Shopville 


Shopville 


274-3108 


Dewey Huff 


Hulen Wilson 




Somerset 


Somerset 


678-4721 


W. B. Jones 


Paul Patterson 


D. 48 


Bush 


Lida 


864-2331 


C. Frank Bentley 


Wayne Bowling 




Hazel Green 


E. Bernstadt 


843-2135 


Clark E. Chesnut 


Raymond Reed 




Lily 


Lily 


864-4330 


Harold Storm 


Bobby Taylor 




London 


London 


864-2181 


Leighton Watkins 


Bill Schott 








REGION 13 




D. 49 


Annville Inst. 


Annville 


364-5109 


Mrs. Ann Morris 


Jerry Hacker 




Brodhead 


Brodhead 


758-2611 


D. A. Robbins 


William D. Riddle 




Clay County 


Manchester 


598-2700 


Robert Campbell 


Henry Garrison 




Jackson County 


McKee 


287-7155 


Clay Harmon 


R. B. Morris 




Livingston 


Livingston 


453-2121 


Buford Parkerson 


Preston Parrett 




Mt. Vernon 


Mt. Vernon 


256-2953 


Cleston Saylor 


Jack L. Laswell 




Oneida Institute 


Oneida 


847-2202 


David C. Jackson 


Winston Kilgore 


D. 50 


Barbourville 


Barbourville 


546-3129 


Robert Koehler 


H. D. Tye 




Corbin 


Corbin 


528-3902 


Louie Martin 


Ralph Baker 




Knox Central 


Barbourville 


546-4138 


Clinton B. Hammons 


Don Bingham 




Lynn Camp 


Corbin 


528-5429 


P. M. Broughton 


Calvin Vaughan 




St. Camillus Acad. 


Corbin 


528-5077 


Sr. Mary 


Rev. C. J. Heitzman 




Whitley County 


Williamsburg 


549-1360 


Louis G. Steely 


G. B. Hendrickson 




Williamsburg 


Williamsburg 


549-3800 


Jack V. Foley 


Dennis Byrd 


D. 51 


Bell County 


Pineville 


337-2329 


James A. Pursifull 


Lee Gambrel 




Henderson Settle 


Frakes 


337-3618 


Herby J. Roark 


Elijah Smith 




Lone Jack 


Four Mile 


337-2435 


C. E. Calloway 


Shirley Goodin 




Middlesboro 


Middlesboro 


248-1000 


Lloyd Sharp 


Willie Hendrickson 




Pineville 


Pineville 


337-2439 


Berry Thacker 


Harlan Davidson 




Red Bird 


Beverly 


337-2848 


Donald G. Scott 


Karl Kingsley 


D. 52 


Cumberland 


Cumberland 


589-4625 


W. Criscillis 


Ralph Roberts 




Evarts 


Evarts 


837-2502 


O. G. Roaden 


Doyle Troutman 




Harlan 


Harlan 


573-3711 


Roy Teague 


George Francis 




James A. Cawood 


Harlan 


573-5027 


W. C. McFarland 


Kenneth Tate 




Lynch 


Lynch 


848-5486 


Jack H. Waff 


Ed Miracle 








REGION 14 




D. 53 


Fleming Neon 


Fleming 


855-7597 


Roy T. Reasor 


Larry D. Kincer 




Jenkins 


Jenkins 


832-2184 


Charles D. Stallard 


William D. Back 




Letcher 


Letcher 


633-2524 


D. C. Taylor 


Danny Bates 




Whitesburg 


Whitesburg 


633-2339 


J. M. Burkich 


Darrell Bell 


D. 54 


Buckhorn 


Buckhorn 


398-7176 


Fred W. Johnson 


Mickie Joe Fields 




Combs Memorial 


Jeff 


436-2500 


Bingham Brashear 


Paul Combs 




Hazard 


Hazard 


436-3711 


Bill C. Hurt 


Roscoe Shackleford 




Leatherwood 


Leatherwood 


675-4431 


John C. Stringer 


William Fannin 




Leslie County 


Hyden 


672-2337 


Wilburn Nantz 


Wendell Wilson 




M. C. Napier 


Hazard 


436-4541 


Dacker Combs 


Albert Combs 


D. 55 


Breathitt 


Jackson 


666-2805 


Millard ToUiver 


Jack Stanford 




Carr Creek 


Carr Creek 


642-3585 


R. B. Singleton 


R. B. Singleton 




Cordia 


Ha^rd 


251-2875 


Alice H. Slone 


Bobby R. Smith 




Hindman 


Hindman 


785-5201 


Vesper Singleton 


Pearl Combs 




Jackson 


Jackson 


666-5164 


James B. Goff 


James B. Goff 




Knott County 


Pippa Passes 


785-5783 


Edward Madden 


James Moore 




Oakdale Christian 


Jackson 


666-5422 


David Tullar 


Eben Graves 




Riverside Christian 


Lost Creek 


666-2359 


Harold E. Barnett 


Doran Hostetler 


D. 56 


Hazel Green Acad. 


Hazel Green 


662-4475 


J. M. Ride way 


Ernie Woods 




Lee County 


Beattvville 


464-8126 


Gordon F. Cook 


Heber Dunaway 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1970 



School 




Address 


Tel. No. 


Principal 


Coach 






Owsley County 


Booneville 


593-5185 


W. O. Gabbard 


Paul Smith 






Powell County 


Stanton 


663-4475 


Fairce O. Woods 


Robert Hoggard 






Wolfe County 


Campton 


668-8565 


M. C. Hagon 


Granville Deaton 










REGION 15 




D 


57 


Inez 


Inez 


298-3264 


Wilburn Goble 


Bill R. Cassady 






Johnson Central 


Paintsville 


798-4890 


W. H. Conley 


Paul Williams 






Louisa 


Louisa 


638-4574 


J. I. Cheek 


Robert L. Prichard 






Paintsville 


Paintsville 


789-3881 


Paul W. Trimble 


Gary Knight 






Salyersville 


Salyersville 


349-2011 


Harlan Hopkins 


Buckey Ellis 






Waifield 


War field 


395-5341 


Russell H. Stepp 


John Williams 


D 


58 


Betsy Layne 


Betsy Layne 


478-2255 


Oscar F. Bush 


Thomas Boyd 






Garrett 


Garrett 


358-3461 


Burnice Gearheart 


John Campbell, Jr. 






McDowell 


McDowell 


377-6202 


Lloyd Stumbo 


Pete Grigsby, Jr. 






Martin 


Martin 


285-3011 


Philip Dingus 


Denzil Halbert 






Maytown 


Langley 


285-3346 


Edwin V. Stewart 


Gene Erasure 






Prestonsburg 


Prestonsburg 


886-2252 


James D. Hensley 


Robert Slone 






Wayland 


Wayland 


358-3911 


Johnnie Case 


Jimmy Cox 






Wheelwright 


Wheelwright 


938-2110 


W. R. Jamerson 


James Francis 


D 


59 


Dorton 


Dorton 


639-2832 


Glenn Wallace 


Donald Blair 






Millard 


Pikeville 


432-3380 


Jack T. Castle 


James Carter 






Mullins 


Pikeville 


432-2733 


W. F. Doane 


Bun J. Burnette 






Pikeville 


Pikeville 


437-6870 


Jack D. Fugate 


Wayne Martin 






Virgie 


Virgie 


639-2774 


Winston Adkins 


Dale Trivette 


D 


60 


Belfry 


Belfry 


353-7362 


Forest D. Tackett 


Millard Bevins 






Elkhorn City 


Elkhorn City 


754-7981 


James V. Powell 


Mike M. Tarry 






Feds Creek 


Feds Creek 


835-2286 


Arnold Roberts 


Ralph Good 






Johns Creek 


Pikeville 


437-6361 


John Lester 


Steve Deskins 






Phelps 


Phelps 


456-7716 


Tim E. Branham 


Franklin Keene 










REGION 16 




D. 


61 


Ezel 


Ezel 


725-4545 


Conrad A. Rowland 


Henry E. Cochran 






Menifee 


Frenchburg 


768-2373 


Hiram C. Walters 


Joe P. Blankenship 






Morgan County 


West Liberty 


743-3705 


Richard Jett 


Charles E. Cain 






Rowan County 


Morehead 


784-4153 


Sherman R. Arnett 


Warren Cooper 






University 














Breckinridge 


Morehead 


784-4181 


Rondal Hart 


Dienzel Dennis 


D. 


62 


Carter 


Carter 


474-6121 


William N. Collins 


Chester ELJifiid 






Hitchins 


Hitchins 


474-5784 


Harlan R. Fleming 


Roy F. Murphy 






Olive Hill 


Olive Hill 


286-2481 


Andrew J. Fultz 


Bert Greene 






Prichard 


Grayson 


474-5421 


H. R. Bowling 


Gary Salyer 






Sandy Hook 


Sandy Hook 


738-6512 


John Vansant 


Jesse Adkins 


D. 


63 


Greenup 


Greenup 


473-3781 


Wade Womack 


Ramey Fletcher 






McKell 


South Shore 


932-3323 


Chester Bruce 


Ed Lowdenback 






Raceland 


Raceland 


836-8221 


Cobbie Lee 


Gary Vaughn 






Russell 


Russell 


836-3531 


Frank Firestine 


Marvin Meredith 






Wurtland 


Wurtland 


836-5931 


Charles Banks 


Larry Jordon 


D. 


64 


Boyd County 


Ashland 


928-6473 


Douglas Cole 


Brice Thornbury 






Catlettsburg 


Catlettsburg 


739-4663 


W. H. Holbrook 


Dale Sexton 






Fairview 


Ashland 


324-9226 


Webb Young 


George Cooke 






Holy Family 


Ashland 


324-7040 


Sister Amabilis 


Bill Carroll 






Paul G. Blazer 


Ashland 


325-4706 


Clyde Hunsaker 


Harold Cole 



APPROVED OFFICIALS 
(Continued from Page Two) 

Colley, Lynn W. 
Cox, Rufus, A. 
Crager, Bobby F. 
Daniels, Robert A. 
Day, Bill E. 
Decker, Dennis L. 
Dunn. Chesley 
Dubbin, Roy V. 
Dyke, Orville Dean 
Eary, Edward B. 
Elmore, Jimmy A. 
Ferguson, Roy 
Fish, Leland G. 



Frankel, Louis S. 
Freppon, Thomas E. 
Goins, Edgar S. 
Hall, William W. 
Hancock, Norb 
Harris, Wayne 
Hawkins, Donald H. 
Hayden, John O. 
Hayes, James V. 
Hensley, Lairy O. 
Hina, Roy D. 
Holton, Ray 
Hook, B. B. 
Hook, Don 
Hume, Charles E. 
Hutchens, Jim 



Jones, Bobby 
Kirk, Charles F. 
Kouns, Robert H. 
Lally, James J. 
Latkovski, Andy 
Laugherty, Kenneth Ray 
LeQuire, Harold M. 
Littlepage, Pryce 
Logsdon, Thomas A. 
Long, Robert F. 
McGinty, L. V, Jr. 
McCoy, Lany 
Massie, Stephen M. 
Milbern, Daniel L. 
Mullins, Lloyd G. 
Nash, Dennis B. 



Nuss, Albert M. 
O'Connell, Jim 
O'Nan, Harold L. 
Osbourn, Joseph A. 
Owens, Bruce E. 
Owens, Biuce Van 
Pardue, Israel L. 
Parsons, Fred R. 
Patterson, Bill 
Pence. Wnu Jerry 
Perkins, Ronnie L. 
Phipps, James M. 
Poe, Thomas E. 
Power, Michael, J.. 
Reliford, Paul 
Rich, Dennis Wayne 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1970 



Page Nine 



Ricketts, Donald R. 
Riggs, Floyd L. 
Rodgers, Tom H. 
Rogers, Eldridge 
Ross, Bill Tom 
Saylors, Carlee 
Schmidt, Thomas C. 
Sears, Wilson 
Seavers, Joe 
Serey, George E., Jr. 
Singleton, Jerry L. 
Smith, Benny L. 
Smith, James H. 
Smith, Roy M. 
Snow, James A. 
Snow, Robert 
Sparrow, John A. 
Spoonamore, Jim 



Stethen, James E. 
Sullivan, Dan L. 
Taylor, Jim 
Thomas, Billy G. 
Thompson, Kenneth E. 
Tillery, James 
Vanover, J. W. 
Vanover, Wiley G. 
Varner, Ray G. 
Vories, Richard 
Ward, Robert 
Weas, Larry J. 
Weihe, Robert J. 
Wells, Glenn 
Weyer, James 
Williams, Tom 
Witten, Hershell 
Wulfeck, Jim 



GUEST EDITORIALS 

Just To Have Molded The Boy A Little 
By Herman L. Masin 



Few high school coaches wind up in the 90 percent tax 
bracket. Not with their take-home pay. They can't even get 
up there by marrying the boss's daughter. All that would give 
them is a principal for a father-in-law. Then why, people ask, 
do coaches dedicate themselves so completely to their prof- 
fession? 

The answer is easy enough. Every coach knows it. But 
imagine Joe Hicks' surprise when he got it all beautifully writ- 
ten out for him by one of the girls in his advanced physical 
education class at James Monroe H. S., Fredericksburg, Va. 

It started out innocently enough with a class assignment; 
"Describe a coach in your own words." Look at the paper Joe 
got from Jan Stokley, a member of the girls hockey and bas- 
ketball teams: 

"Coaching, particularly high school coaching, isn't espec- 
ially noted for its golden financial opportunities. Why, then, 
have so many outstanding people chosen it as a career. Is it 
only because they themselves were good athletes or is it be- 
cause they saw values in it that could not be gained behind an 
office desk or computer? 

'To dedicate himself to a job, a person must derive satis- 
faction from it. In coaching, satisfaction can come from the 
achievements of a team or a particular performer, say a state 
basketball championship or a high jump record. 

"However, the real satisfaction usually lies in working with 
the athletes themselves, whether they are champions or cellar- 
dwellers. The communication between athlete and coach can 
easily develop into a lasting friendship, built on mutual re- 
pect and understanding. The coach can gain just as much from 
this friendship as the athlete, possibly more. 

"Once the coach establishes such communication his in- 
fluence becomes immeasurable. He holds the power to develop 
not only an excellent sportsman but a sensitive and well-ad- 
justed person. 

"The normal barriers between young people and adults us- 
ually come down between athletes and coaches. The chance to 
be even a small part of the panorama of people and the events 
that shape lives is eagerly seized by a good coach, and he us- 
ually profits from it years later when one of 'his boys' accom- 
plishes the unprecedented or impossible. Just to have molded 
the boy a little is enough; it is the greatest value of coaching. 

"Coaching is the greatest because it's alive and always mov- 
ing. Different people, different situations, different challenges; 
this is what coaching offers. It never stagnates, because the 
people that the coach works with - the athletes - never do. 
They set new goals, try for new records, dream new dreams. 
The accomplishments of one always becomes the goal of the 
next to surpass. 



"But the athlete needs more than his own desire to carry 
through. He needs a coach who cares. It's the coach's job to 
train and encourage, to use his experience to the athlete's ad- 
vantage. If and when the athlete attains his goal, his success 
is the coach's only reward. 

"But what more reward could any coach, any person, 
want?" 

Scholastic Coach. 



Spectators Ethics 



The need for some rules of good conduct on the part of 
spectators has been felt for some time. In compliance with a 
request from the Board of Control, the staff of the NCHSAA 
has drafted the following Code of Ethics and it is presented 
here with the request that member schools use every oppor- 
tunity to bring it before students, adult fans and organized 
groups. In this way we hope to improve spectator conduct at 
all our athletic events. 

It is highly recommended that principals encourage their 
students to develop their own code of ethics for spectators, 
using the following as a model. 

Believing that sportsmanship is a by-product of a spirit of 
tolerance and good will and the centering of attention on the 
good qualities of all involved, and 

Believing that my conduct is an important part in the 
school athletic program, I pledge myself to act in accordance 
with these principals. 

As an athletic spectator I will: 

1. EXEMPLIFY the highest moral character, behavior, and 
leadership so as to be a worthy example. 

2. MAINTAIN and exhibit poise, self-discipline, and re- 
straint during and after the contest. 

3. CONDUCT myself in such a manner that attention is 
drawn not to me, but to the participants playing the game. 

4. REGULATE my actions at all times so that I will be a 
credit to the team I support, knowing the school gets the praise 
or blame for my conduct since I represent my school the same 
as does the athlete. 

5. SUPPORT all reasonable moves to improve good sports- 
manship. 

6. TREAT the visiting team and spectators as guests, being 
courteous and fair. 

7. AVOID actions which will offend the individual athlete. 

8. ACCEPT the judgment of the coach. 

9. HONOR the rights of the visitors in a manner in which 
I would expect to be treated. 

10. RESPECT the property of the school. 

11. DISPLAY good sportsmanship by being modest in vic- 
tory and gracious in defeat. 

12. PAY respects to both teams as they enter for com- 
petition. 

13. APPRECIATE the good plays by both teams. 

14. SHOW sympathy for an injured player. 

15. REGARD the officials as guests and treat them as such. 

16. DIRECT my energy to encouraging my team rather 
than booing the officials. 

17. BELIEVE that the officials are fair and accept their 
decisions as final. 

18. LEARN the rules of the game in order to try to be a 
more intelligent fan. 

19. CONSIDER it a privilege and duty to encourage every- 
one to live up to the spirit of the rules of fair play and sports- 
manship. 

20. REALIZE that privileges are invariably associated with 
great responsibilities and that spectators have great responsi- 
bilities. 

North Carolina H.S.A.A. Bulletin 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1970 



THE PROBLEM OF LOSING WEIGHT 

By Stanley W. Henson, Jr., M.D. 

EDITOR'S NOTE: Dr. Henson has the necessary experience 
and professional training to intelligently present the subject 
of weight reduction for wrestling. He was a three-time N. C. 
A. A. champion at Oklahoma State University and is a mem- 
ber of the Helm's Foundation Amateur Wrestling Hall of Fame. 
In addition, he is a Diplomat of the American Board of Sur- 
gery and a Fellow of the American College of Surgery. Weight 
reduction in wrestling has long been one of the problem areas 
at the interscholastic level. This paper explains in great detail 
the reasons why everyone should be concerned with this pro- 
blem. It is highly recommended for coaches, administrators, 
parents and athletes. 

Clifford B. Fagan 

The objective of losing excess weight is to achieve maxi- 
mum physical efficiency. This should be an important part of 
any athletic training program. 

The objective of establishing weight classes in wrestling is 
to match young men of equal size against one another. 

Neither of these objectives is consistent with a desire to 
give one boy or one team an advantage in size merely because 
the coach or trainer is able to sweat more pounds off his team 
than his opponents . 

Ideally, wrestlers should lose the excess weight they cany 
until they achieve their best weight for maximum performance. 
They would then wrestle in whatever weight class they fall. 

In most instances, a boy can lose several pounds of weight 
and not be affected by it, expecially if it is done slowly and 
properly. All too often one sees a wrestler badly defeated, not 
by his opponent alone, but by the program of weight reduc- 
tion he has followed prior to weighing-in. 

How can this problem be resolved? To begin with, the 
coach or trainer must understand basic problems in weight 
reduction. He must understand the sources of weight that 
can be safely dealt with. He must understand how much 
weight can safely be lost by an individual boy. He must also 
understand how fast it can be lost and, most important of all, 
the sources of body weight that should not be interfered with. 

There axe two mam sources of body weight which can be 
removed from the human body - body fat and body fluid. 
Depot fat is excess weight for athletes. It is utilized by the 
body too slowly to be useful during an athletic contest. It can 
be eliminated almost entirely from the body if done slowly 
and properly Unfortunately, this is the hardest weight to lose. 

Body fluid on the other hand is not excess weight. Loss of 
just a few pounds may be dangerous, and to the athlete it can 
be disastrous so far as his physical and mental efficiency is con- 
cerned. It is unfortunate that this is the easiest weight to lose 
and accounts for most of the mistakes that are made by wrest- 
lers, coaches and trainers. 

Now let us consider these two main sources of weight and 
how they can safely be dealt with. Fat is oxidized in the body 
into two main components, glycerol and fatty acid. Glycerol 
is utilized as carbohydrate or glucose with release of heat and 
energy. Fatty acids, on the other hand, are oxidized further 
with production of ketone bodies. These ketone bodies are 
utilized slowly by the body at a constant rate. When fat is 
oxidized at a rapid rate, ketone bodies are formed faster than 
they can be utilized. They accumulate in the body and result 
in a clinical state called ketosis or acidosis. 

The body gives up stored fat slowly and reluctantly. Car- 
bohydrates are utilized first and after the available stores of 
carbohydrates are used, the body converts stored fat into its 
breakdown products mentioned above. The loss of depot fat 
is accomplished only by starvation. During this period of utili- 
zation of fat, the athlete becomes irritable and restless. He is 
not in the best condition for active competition until the pro- 
cess is completed. Fat should be lost at a slow rate to prevent 
acidosis, probably not more than three to five pounds a week. 
The ideal or optimum weight should be reached before com- 
petition begins and the weight held steady within a few pounds 



of the wrestler's weight class throughout the wrestling season. 
Vitamin B Complex should probably be given during this per- 
iod, since certain vitamins of the group act as enzymes to fa- 
cilitate the oxidation of fats. 

Body fluid makes up 70% of our total body weight. We 
take in fluid through the gastro-intestinal tract with our food, 
and lose fluid through the lungs, sweat glands and the kidneys. 
It is the function of the kidneys to regulate the chemical 
structure of the body fluids. Excess loss of body fluid results 
in dehydration. An important feature of dehydration is that 
water loss is always accompanied by loss of electrolytes. Elect- 
rolytes are the ions in solution in body fluid which are neces- 
sary for all physiologic functions such as transmission of nerve 
impulses and the contraction of muscle. An effort is made by 
the body, especially the kidneys, to preserve the delicate ionic 
concentration of electrolytes by selective excretion of them 
in the urine. When the process of dehydration is rapid or pro- 
longed, concentration of these electrolytes departs progress- 
ively from their normal values because there is a lag in fluid 
and electrolyte adjustment between the fluid compartments 
of the body. Initially the water loss is sustained by the inter- 
stitial fluid. Nature tries to protect the blood volume and the 
intracellular fluid volume. With advancing dehydration, kid- 
ney function is impaired, there is loss of blood volume, and 
finally loss of intracellular fluid. With only moderate electro- 
lyte inbalance extreme weakness, mental confusion and mus- 
cular incoordination results. 

In summary then we might outline a program of weight 
reduction for wrestlers. First, the trainer or coach should de- 
termine what the optimum weight for each wrestler should be. 
This is the weight at which the individual performs at his max- 
imum efficiency. 

Secondly, the wrestler should lose the depot or storage 
fat that he has on his body. This should be done at a slow, 
even rate, and is best done before the season begins. It re- 
quires discipline, an adequate diet, and perhaps supplemental 
vitamins of the B Complex group. 

Third, the caloric intake must be adjusted to maintain the 
ideal weight of the individual. 

Finally, one should not disturb the fluid and electrolyte 
balance of the body, because the greater the disturbance, the 
less efficiently the wrestler will perform and the longer it will 
take to reestablish a proper balance. 



BASKETBALL QUESTIONS 

(Continued from Page One) 

exception to causing the ball to go from the front court to 
the back court, relates only to a jump ball and does not apply 
to a throw-in. Here we refer to rule 9-9. 6-1 (b) provides that 
the ball becomes alive "on a throw-in" when the ball touches 
or is touched by a player who is inbounds. A2 has control 
when he catches the ball. 

14. Play: A5 was in the game when the first half'ended. 
After one minute of play, in the second half, it is discovered 
that A5 changed his shirt number during the intermission 
without reporting it to the scorer and an official. 

Ruling: A5 is immediately disqualified. Team B is awarded 
two free throws after which team B is awarded the ball out of 
bounds at the division line. 

15. Play: Al, whose forearm, hand or wrist is injured, has 
to be protected by a cast, the surface of which is entirely 
covered with a soft padding. 

Ruling: Illegal equipment. Casts and braces for forearm, 
hand and wrist, made of sole leather, plastic, metal or any 
other hard substance, are always illegal equipment, regardless 
of whether these are covered with a soft material. 

16. Play: What shirt numbers are legal? 

Ruling: Only arabic numbers are legal. Arabic numbers 
which comply with the rules are: even; 0, 4, 10, 12, 14, 20, 
22, 24, 30, 32, 34, 40, 42, 44, 50, 52, 54; odd 3, 5, 11, 13, 
15, 21, 23, 25, 31, 33, 35, 41, 43, 45, 51, 53, 55. It is not 
illegal to use a double 00 or three digit numbers. However, 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1970 



Page Eleven 



the Basketball Rules Committee strongly recommends against 
their use. 

17. Play: (a) Al, in his back court, dribbles for 8 seconds 
and then throws the ball against the leg of opponent Bl, after 
which he recovers and holds the ball; or (b) Al passes toward 
A2 and the ball is batted by Bl, but continues on to A2 who 
secures control. 

Ruling: The ball remained in control of Team A in both 
(a) and (b). 10 seconds count continues in both situations. 

18. Play: Al, is between Bl and B2 on the restraining 
circle prior to a jump ball. When the official is ready to make 
the toss, Al backs off the circle. B2 moves over next to Bl 
and A2, then moves into the position indicated by B2. 

Ruling: When the official is ready to make the toss, posi- 
tions on the restraining circle are frozen. A player may move 
off the circle. However, no players may change his position on 
the circle nor may other players come up and take positions 
on the circle. The purpose of this interpretation is to elimin- 
ate jockeying for position and creating game delay situation. 

19. Play: After the ball has been placed at the disposal of 
Al for a free throw, A3, who has taken a position in the se- 
cond lane space moves out of it backward. 

Ruling: No infraction. The restriction regarding moving 
out of the lane space applies only to opponents of the free 
thrower. 

20. Play: What are the dimensions of player spaces on the 
restraining cylinder (line) of the jump circle? 

Ruling: These spaces are assumed to be comparable in 
size, both depth and width, to the free throw lane spaces. 
Therefore, they are 3 feet deep and 3 feet wide. 

21. Play: During a jump ball, or while the ball is in flight 
after an unsuccessful field goal attempt, or whue it is in flight 
from the batting of a rebound, the official sounds his whistle: 
(a) accidentally; or (b) because the ball has lodged on the bas- 
ket flange; or (c) because a player has been seriously injured 
and the play is completed in accordance with the note follow- 
ing 5-8; or (d) to signify basket interference or goal tending. 

Ruling: Play is resumed in (a), (b), and (c) by a jump ball 
between any two opponents in the circle which is nearest to 
where the ball becomes dead. In (d), the penalty for the vio- 
lation is administered following the ball becoming dead. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled January 1) 

If the telephone number is given for an official, it is the 
home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two num- 
bers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Adams, Sandy Dale, Greenup Courthouse, Greenup, 473-4161 
Bradford, Mike, General Delivery, Loyall, 573-5087, 573- 

5028 
Brooks, Steve, Leestown Road, Frankfort, 3-0351, 3-0565 
Bunch, Charles Douglas, 1569 E. 15th Street, Bowling Green, 

842-4513, 842-7302 
Cline, Gary G., Baisden, West Virginia 
Curley, Tom, 1408 Larchmont, Louisville, 637-3095, 935- 

3155 
Denham, Alan R., 521 Laurel Street, Ludlow, 261-6441, 431- 

6969 
Elliott, Douglas C, 106 Derringer, Springfield, 336-7970, 336- 

7771 
Farmer. Jack, 1 1 3 Rolling HillSj Danvillej 236-3192,, 236-2711 
Gaines, Harvey, 752 So. 43rd, Louisville, 774-4011, 895-3401, 

Ext. 323 
Garland, Danny A., 1220 Dale Avenue. Frankfort, 223-8608 
Graham, James £., 2517 Jachson Street, Ashland, 324-8169, 

324-1155 
Grant Larry Tho"ias, 7613 Mackie Lane, Louisville, 366- 

9027, S84-8887 
Hall, Tommy D., Ky. Towers, Apt. 7, Berea 
Harrison, Timothy L., Box 142, Drakesboro, 476-8603 

Hess, Creighton L., Route 2, Box 225, Sonora, 369-2802, 
369-2101 



Hilton, Dudley, 516 Walnut Street, Springfield, 336-7667, 

336-3922 
Hixon, Howard, Route 1, Waynesburg, 379-561 1 
Hobbs, Roger Ray, Route 609, Box 33, Coldiron, 573-1176, 

664-3870 
Hounshell, Bill, 440 Ann Street, Irvine, 723-2882, 723-2550 
Isaacs, Franklin, Route 1, Waynesburg, 379-4403 
Jacobs, D. R., 254 Seminole, Paducah, 554-3489, 443-2461 
Karasick, Howard, 1225 College Street, Bowling Green, 781- 

2467 
Kay, Thomas D., Route 3, Versailles, 873-3300, Lexington, 

255-1461 
Kendall, Patrick M., 633 Princeton Apts. No. 7, Owensboro, 

684-5957, 684-5957 
Kimble, Paul L., West Union, Ohio, 544-2962, 544-3132 
King, Price J., 3775 Thruston-Dermont Road, Owensboro. 

683-3169, 683-2401 
Lewis, Tommy, 221 Michigan Avenue, Whitesburg, 633-2336 
McLeod, Robert N., Myrtlewood, Somerset, 678-5536, 678- 

8766 
Mang, Berry W., Jr., 1624 Woodburn, Covington, 261-9932, 

632-8441 
Marcum, Homer F., 606 Harvey Street, Williamson, West Vir- 
ginia, 235-1585, 393-3200 
Meredith, Wilmoth J., 5815 Noah Drive, Louisville, 447-0449 
Nixon, Larry Douglas, 400 Colonial Terrace, Hopkinsville, 

886-2915 
Pace, Donald, 2023 Deauville, Lexington, 252-6535, 255- 

0398, 255-8203 
Padgett, Jerry W., 110 College Street, Somerset, 678-8575, 

678-5151 
Parsons, Kenneth, Loyall, 573-4258, 837-2502 
Poe, Thomas E., Route 6, Benton, 527-2131 
Scott, Sidney H., 510 Short Cut Road, Albany, 387-52 84 

387-5186 
Sharp, Lloyd, 314 N. 25th Street, Middlesboro, 248-6847, 

248-1000 
Stroud, Donnie M., 173 Tennyson Drive, Owensboro, 684- 

5401, 684-8881, Ext. 35 
Switzer, Richard, Jr., 3 Circle Drive, Florence, 371-5037, 

581-0158 
Szymansky, Nick, 2105 Ronnie Avenue, Louisville, 448-4658, 

448-7212 
Taylor, John, 803 East Drive, Danville, 236-3915, 236-3183 
Wayne, James C, 109 Judson Hall, Godfrey Avenue, Louis- 
ville 
Whaley, Ronald J., 207 8th. Street, Middlesboro, 248-6221, 

248-1000 
Withrow, Roy D., Sacramento, 736-2817, 736-2343 



MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky High School Ath- 
letic Association met at the K.H.S.A.A. building, Lexington, 
on Saturday afternoon, December 20, 1969. The meeting was 
called to order by President Ralph C. Dorsey at 2:00, with all 
Board members, Commissioner Theo. A. Sanford, Assistant 
Commissioner J. B. Mansfield, and Assistant Commissioner 
Billy V. Wise present. The invocation was given by W. H. 
Crowdus. 

W. H. Crowdus moved, seconded by Richard Vincent, that 
the reading of the minutes of the September 27th meeting be 
waived, since members of the Board had received copies of 
these minutes. The motion was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner reported that the football champion- 
ship playoffs continue to be successful, with increased attend- 
ance at the first round, semi-final and final games. Financial 
reports had been received from ten game managers, indicat- 
ing that all expenses had been paid with shares of profits 
having been sent to the schools involved. The finals in the 
three classes, held in Louisville and Lexington, had set a new 
record in receipts and attendance. He recommended that each 
team in the three classes participating in the playoff finals be 
allowed the amount of $600.00 for incidental expenses. W. 
H. Crowdus moved, seconded by Don Davis, that the ex- 
pense allowance for each of the class finalists, recommended 
by the Commissioner, be approved by the Board. The motion 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1970 



In Stock for 
Immediate Delivery 

First-aid Supplies 



A.B.A. Cold Tablets 

Adhesive Tape 

Alcohol 

Am Caps 

Analgestic Liniment 

Ankle Brace 

Ankle Weights 

Ankle Wraps 

Aspirin 

Athletic Liniment 

Athletic Soap 

Ath-O-Gesic 

Atomic Balm 

Atomic Rub-Down 

Band Aid 

Batter's Rosin 

Bike Tape 

Black Magic 

Body Powder 

Butterfly Tablets 

Carbonate Stick 

Cotton 

Cotton Applicators 

Cramergesic 

Dextrotabs 

Dial-A-Tab 



Dry Smelling Salt 

Elastic Wraps 

Elbow Pads 

Felt 

Firm Grip 

First Aid Kits 

Foam Rubber 

Foot Ointment 

Foot Powder 

Foot Solution 

Fung-o -spray 

Gauze 

Glare Guard 

Instant Ice 

Iso-Quin 

J & J Cream 

J & J Tape 

Kleen Ball 

Knee Braces 

Knee Pads 

Tape 

Tape Remover 

Tongue Depressors 

Towels 

Training Kits 

Tuf-Skin 

Vitamins 



The Sport Shop 



Phone 502 651 5143 




106-110 North Race Street 
Glasgow, Kentucky 



42141 

Write for 1 969-70 school 



catalogue 



Richard Vincent moved, seconded by Foster J. Sanders, 
that the next Board meeting be held in Louisville on January 
24, 1970. The motion was carried unanimously, 
was earned unanimously. 

Chairman J. B. Mansfield of the Trophy Committee re- 
ported that sealed bids for the 1970 district and regional bas- 
ketball trophies were opened at the K.H.SA.A. office on Oct- 
ober 18, 1969. He stated that the Committee accepted the 
bids of the Hunt's Athletic Goods Company, Mayfield. Ken- 
tucky, for both district and regional trophies. The price per 
set of the district trophies was $32.00, and the price per set 
of the regional trophies was $48.00. 

Foster J. Sanders moved, seconded by Don Davis, that the 
Commissioner be directed to make lodging reservations in the 
Kentucky Lake area for the summer meeting of the Board of 
Control, the suggested date being the last weekend in July. 
The motion was carried unanimously. 

Administrators and coaches representing the Boyd Countv, 
Paul G. Blazer and Russell high schools met with the Board 
for the purpose of discussing certain problems relating to foot- 
ball game scheduling in District 1, Region 3, of Class AA. The 
discussion related to possible re-districting for the football 
seasons of 1971 and 1972. 

The Commissioner stated that he planned to re-schedule 
the 1970 Class AAA regional and state track meets for boys 
and girls to the dates of May 15, and May 22, with the ap- 
proval of the Board of Control. Members of the Board saw no 
objection to this change in dates. 

The Commissioner stated that he had received a letter 
from Mr. Jerry Rexroat, Chairman of a Hospitality Committee 
representing several local officials' associations, requesting that 
the associations be given the opportunity to sponsor a hos- 
pitality room at the forthcoming State High School Basket- 
ball Tournament. The Board gave its approval to the request. 

Chairman Foster J. Sanders ot the Re'urement Committee 
stated that his committee had met and was making a study of 
the current retirement program of the Association, with the 
idea of making certain improvements in the program; and that 



certain recommendations of the Committee would be made at 
a subsequent meeting of the Board of ContioL 

Chairman Don Davis of the Building Committee stated 
that his committee had met and was continuing its search for 
an adequate site on which the proposed new K.H.S.A.A. of- 
fice building would be erected. 

James T. Dotson moved, seconded by Tom Mills, that all 
bills of the Association for the period beginning September 1, 
1969, and ending November 30, 1969, be allowed. The mo- 
tion was carried unanimously. 

There being no further business, the meeting adjourned. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED WRESTLING OFFICIALS 

Colyer, Richard S., 135 Rolling Hills, Danville, 236-8777 
Foster, David H., 983 Fincastle Road. Lexington, 266-7962, 

233-8212 
McMillim, Larry, P. O. Box 178, Crestwood, 241-8998. 241- 

4458 
Nieporte, Ronald, 1 2 1 Washington, Bellevue, 43 1-4095 
Quinn, Larry L., 26 Valley View Court, New Albany, Indiana. 

945-3986. 283-661 1 
Vogelsang, Larry B., 25 New Uri Avenue, Florence, 371-5365 



The Game Guy Award 

The Game Guy Award, which was originated by Charlie 
Vettiner in 1949 and which has been presented to its recip- 
ient each year at the annual meeting of the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association, will be continued by the Associa- 
tion. 

School representatives and registered officials may make 
nominations for the award. The person eligible to receive the 
award should be a pupil at the junior or senior high school 
level who has overcome a great physical handicap in order to 
take part in athletics. 

Letters of recommendation should be addressed to "Game 
Guy Committee, K.H.S.A.A., P. O. Box 1173, Lexington, 
Kentucky 40501." Deadline for the 1970 nominations is Ap- 
ril 1. 



The KINGDEN Company 

LIFE DEPARTMENT 

121 123 Lafayelle Ave. 
Scholastic. Athlelic. p O. Box 7100 

Life, Accident - Health, Lexington, Kentucky 40502 

Special Risks. Telephone 254-4095 



January 10, 1970 



Dear Reader: 

For a good many years you have seen our ads in this space. You 
may have decided that they are repetitious, lacking in imagin- 
ation, or even inept. 

You may be right. But consider our dilemma. Our product is 
intangible until it is needed - then it becomes very tangible 
indeed - in terms of prompt service and hard cash to pay the 
expenses of an injury. 

Intangibles cannot be readily shown by pictures or charts in 
ads. Our interest in and understanding of your problems are 
real. Our years of experience in providing the best coverage 
and claim service at a realistic price are also real. The fact 
that the cheapest is rarely the best or most serviceable has 
been proven over and over. 

But, how do you express these facts? We try in two ways: 

1. By the use of our simple ads. 

2. By trying to keep abreast of current trends affecting 
your insurance needs and offering service and insurance 
coverage to meet these needs. 

The Cooperative Football Plan for Kentucky High Schools is one 
development we feel proves our awareness of your needs. 

If you are not now using our services shouldn't you find out 
about them? 

Sincerely , 



THE KINGDEN COMPANY 

C 



an* 




E. McCreary, Manage 
Life Department 

JEM/ka 



K. H. S. A. A. TOURNAMENT DIRECTORS 

District and Regional Tournament Directors can get all of their supplies 
and needs to run a tournament from Hunt's. We have the merchandise 
listed below in stock for immediate shipment. Call or write us your needs. 

BASKETBALLS 

Got the feel of a basketball same as will be used in the State Tournament in 
Louisville, and in your District or Regional Tournament. We have all 
brands. 

ADMISSION TICKETS 

Complete stock of admission tickets, 2,000 tickets to the roll numbered con- 
secutively. Printed ADULT, STUDENT, and ADMIT ONE. $1.50 per roll 
of 2,000. 

TROPHIES AND AWARDS 

We can take care of your Sportsmanship trophies, individual charms for 
All-Star teams, etc. Our stock is complete and we can engrave in our store 
and ship to you at once. 

ACCESSORIES 

Nets, scorebooks, first-aid supplies, whistles, stopwatches, timers' horns, 
powdered rosin, bath towels, shoe laces, colored top sweat socks, carry-all 
bags. All of this merchandise in stock for at once delivery. 

BANKS AND GOALS 

We have a complete stock of fan-shaped steel, fan-shaped and rectangular 
glass backboards complete with goals and nets in stock for at once delivery. 
A phone call will get them off to you at once. 

FAIR-PLAY ELECTRIC BASKETBALL SCOREBOARDS 

We have IN STOCK the Fair Play Tick-A-Way Scoreboard ready for imme- 
diate shipment. A call will get one to your gymnasium before tournament 
time. 

Turn all of your needs over to us. We will be glad to handle them for you. 
ROY BOYD, JIM MITCHELL, WADE BURLESON or C. A. BYRN, JR. 
are always ready to assist you in every way possible. 

If you want the BEST QUALITY and the BEST SERVICE contact HUNT'S 

HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO., INC. 

CH 7-1941 — PHONES — CH 7-1942 

MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 
PHONE 459-6366 LOUISVDLLE, KY. 



We Ship-The DaYYou BuV^I 





High School Athlete 



CLASS AJt STATE CHAMPION MT. STERLING 
















(Left to Right) Front Row: Frank Greene, Roy Garrett, Gary Gilmore, Doug Cunningham, Robert 
Brooks, Charley Owens, Eddie Miller, Jim Malone, Steve McGuire, Bob Unger, Perry Colliver. Second 
Row: Jerry Spencer, George Calico, Mike Gatewood, Rusty Duff, Dennis Bonfield, Gary Orme, Dan 
Lane, Steve Hatfield, Mac McCormick, Jack Carrington, Tom Orme, Tommy Breeze, Arthur Clayton, 
Gary Blake. Third Row: Tony Fritz, Larry Garrett, Jerry Hamilton, Richard Jones, Robert Thompson, 
Jeff Garrison, C. D. Highley, Mike Lavoie, Tom Edwards, Terry Barnard, Robert Garrison, Gary Ingram, 
Rodney Shultz. Fourth Row: Mgr. Alfred Blevins, Mgr. Charlie Lindsay, Mgr. David Lane. 



Mt. Sterling 6-Tompkinsville 16 
Mt. Sterling 24-Georgetown 
Mt. Sterling 28-M. M.I. 
Mt. Sterling 30-Jessamine County 
Mt. Sterling 2 8-Madison 12 



Mt. Sterling 60-Paris 14 
Mt. Sterling 8-Henry Clay 
Mt. Sterling 14-Danville 14 
Mt. Sterling 74-Bath County 8 
Mt. Sterling 69-Nicholas County I 



Mt. Sterling 24-Dayton 
Mt. Sterling 16-Lynch 14 
Mt. Sterling 2U-Bardstown 14 



Official Organ of tbe 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 



FEBRUARY 1970 






Letter From The Commissioner 

To The District Tournament Manager: 

Will you please refer to your K.H.S.A.A booklet which 
gives rules and regulations governing basketball tournaments. 
You should familiarize yourself with these rules, fo;md on 
pages 31-39. Your special attention is called to the second 
paragraph of Tournament Rule VI-A-3, relative to the enroll- 
rpent of your district coaches in the Kentucky High School 
Coaches Association. 

ihe forms for your various reports are self-explanatory. 
The report of games should be mailed to the manager of the 
regional tournament not later than Monday, March 9. Send 
your financial report, your checked eligibility lists, and the 
second copy of the report of games to the Commissioner as 
ioon after the tournament as possible. For your convenience, 
the following check list is given. 

L Invite member SCTlools TcTyour tournament a I" ONCE, 
reminding each school to send each member school in the dis- 
trict a COMPLETE preliminary list of players on or before 
February 1, and to send you THREE copies of a final list one 
week prior to the district tournament. See Rule VIII. 

2. Announce the time of drawings in your letter. See Rule 
IX. 

3. At your meeting, conduct the drawings and select the 
officials. The state plan for division of tournament receipts is 
recommended. If any other plan is used, a majority vote of the 
participating schools must be obtained. 

4. Your attention is called especially to the last two para- 
graphs of Tournament Rule V-A, and to Tournament Rule 
V-C. 

5. The following procedure has been established by the 
Board of Control in the selection of tournament officials un- 
der authority given in Tournament Rule V-A: (a) Each school 
represented at the meeting may submit the names of one or 
more officials. There shall be a minimum of eight names on the 
list of officials to be voted on. NO NAME SHALL BE MARK- 
ED OFF THE LIST, (b) Each school representative shall rank 
eight officials in the order of his preference, the first choice 
being assigned eight points, the second seven points, etc. (c) 
The tournament manager shall communicate at once with thi 
highest ranking official or officials in the order of their rank. 
If the official who is selected can not be reached within one 
hour of the time of his selection, or if he is not available, the 
tournament manager shall attempt to employ the next of- 
ficial or officials on the list in the order of their selection. If 
the tournament manager attempts to contact the official by 
telephone and there is no answer, the manager should check 
with the operator for a possible change in the official's num- 
ber, (d) If two officials are tied on points, the highest ranking 
official shall be determined by flipping a coin, (e) If none of 
the officials on the list is available, the tournament manager 
shall have the sole responsibility of securing an official or of- 
ficials for the tournament. 

6. Tournament Rule XV says: "The Board of Control is 
authorized to select, standardize, and purchase «rophies for 
all district and regional tournaments and the cost of these 
trophies shall be borne by the respective districts and regions." 
The Board has contracted with the Hunt's Athletic Goods 
Company, Mayfield, Kentucky, to supply all of the official 
K.H.S.A.A. district first place and second place basketball 
trophies for the 1970 tournaments, each trophy complete 
with the Association seal and engraving. Your trophies will be 
shipped to you prior to March 1. 

7. It is the responsibility ot tne tournament manager to 
secure adequate police protection. 

8. THE BOARD OF CONTROL HAS RULED THAT NOT 
MORE THAN TWELVE PLAYERS MAY BE IN UNIFORM 
FOR ANY ONE TOURNAMENT GAME, AN D THAT OTHER 
SQUAD MEMBERS SHALL NOT BE ALLOWED TO PART- 
ICIPATE IN WARM-UP EXERCISES, THIS BEING IMPLIED 
IN TOURNAMENT RULE XI. 

9. Please ask your officials to designate the goals prior to 
warm-up time for each game. 

10. You will receive three copies of a final eligibility list 
from each school. Have one of these checked by the coach of 



each competing team, before his team plays, for the twelve 
players he will use in each game. Use only one list for checking 
players on each team since the other two copies may be need- 
ed by the regional and state tournament managers. Send the 
Commissioner all of these checked copies with your other re- 
ports. Send the two unchecked copies of eligibility lists of the 
winner and runner-up to the manager of your regional tour- 
nament, along with one copy of your report of games, not 
later than March 9. 

11. It has been ruled that the 2:00 o'clock mentioned in 
Tournament Rule 1V-B may be considered Eastern Standard 
time or 1:00 P.M. CENTRAL STANDARD TIME. This in- 
formation concerning -:he starting time of the regional meet- 
ing should be given to your winner and runner-up. 

12. Send Secretary Ohr of the Kentucky Coaches Assoc- 
iation the list of district coaches to be enrolled in his organ- 
ization and remittance for these, and sei d the Commissioner 
the various reports mentioned above as so in as possible. 

13. Tournament Rule VI-A-3 provides that the district 
representative to the annual meeting may be allowed for ex- 
penses an amount not to exceed $75.00. Since this is a ma."d- 
mum and not necessarily a fixed amount, the delegate should 
be asked to submit an estimate of the cost of his lodging, 
transportation, and meals because of his representing the dis- 
trict at the annual meeting. 

Sincerely yours, 
Ted Sanford, Commissioner 
K.H.S.A.A. 
Attention!!! 

The Board of Control has the authority to set the fees for 
district tournament officials. The following regulations for 
1970 have been set by the Board: "The officials shall receive 
a fee of $25.00 per game and a transportation allowance of 
10 cents per mile for all necessary traveL In the event it is 
necessary for the official to remain overnight at the tourna- 
ment site, he shall be paid an additional $20.00 per day for 
lodging and meals." 



Mr. Kelley's 1970 Poem 

K.H.S.A.A. poet laureate Elmer Kelley of Madisonville, 
who has written poems for the last four state basketball tour- 
naments, presents his poem about the forthcoming tourna- 

ment Greatest Show On Earth 

(Kentucky Version) 

Hark to the sound of fury mounting, 
Blink to the light on polished board, 

Quicken to the step of masses surging, 
Ride with the tide of the cheering horde. 

Thrill to the tightness of the tension. 
Lean to the underdog's pulsing side, 

Leap when the throng stands wildly screaming, 
Groan when the arching shot is wide. 

Sixteen came with high hopes holding, 
Two can survive to the final fight. 

Four times eight and history claims it, 
One is left to proclaim its might. 

Bedlam? Yes, you'd have to call it, 
Tears and cheers with moans and mirth. 

Add 'em up, you've got the answer. 
It's the Greatest Show On Earth! 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXXII-NO. 7 



FEBRUARY. 1970 



SI. 00 Per Year 



Basketball Questions 

EDITOR'S MOTE: These interpretations of the rules ol 
the National Basketball Committee of the United States and 
Canada do not set aside nor modify any rule. The rulings are 
made by the National Federation of State High School Ath- 
letic Associations in response to situations presented. 

21. Play: The official places the ball at the disposal of Al 
who has been awarded a free throw. Bl, from a position in 
the third free throw lane space, comments in a voice loud 
enough for Al to hear, "Okay big shot, let's see you make 
this free throw." Bl may or may not be looking directly at 
Al. 

Ruling: This is disconcerting. It is a violation. Discon- 
certing acts can consist of action which, mentally or phy- 
sically, upsets the player who will attempt the free throw. A 
disconcerting act can take place while the free thrower is pre- 
paring to make the try. 

22. Play: Al, in the front court, passes the ball parallel 
and close to the division line. The official is standing in the 
back court or on the division line. The pass from Al strikes 
the official and rebounds into the front court where A2 se- 
cures corrttel. 

Ruling: Violation. Al" has returned the ball to the back— 
couxt. The violation occurs- when A2 is first to touch the ball 
after Al caused the balLto go into the back court from the 
front court. 

23. Play: Team A is responsible for action. Al, in control 
of the ball, has been warned and is not closely guarded. He 
has 5 seconds to advance the ball out of the mid-court into 
the scoring area. At the count of 5 he is holding the ball, 
straddling the mid-court line. 

Ruling: Violation. When Al is straddling the mid-court 
line or touching the mid-court line with his foot or any other 
part of his body while holding the ball, he has not moved out 
of the mid-court area. The mid-court line and the admini- 
stration relative to it is comparable to 'hat of the division 
line. The mid-court line is considered part of the mid-court 
area on the same basis that the division line is considered 
part of the back court area. 

24. Play: Must the timer start the clock when the official 
signals even though the timer knows the official starting the 
clock is in error. For example, the official indicates two free 
throws and then signals that the clock start when the first 
free throw is missed permitting the ball to go into play. 

Ruling: Bench officials, including the timer, work under 
the supervision of the floor officials and are obligated to fol- 
low the directions of the floor officials. The rules provide 
that if the official gives no direction, such as indication when 
the clock should start in situations in which it should start by 
rule, the timer may, in such situations, start the clock without 
the official signalling. However, the rules do not permit the 
timer to ignore the direction of the floor official in case he 
does signal. 

25. Play: Following a try for a field goal, while the ball is 
in flight but before it reaches the basket cylinder, Bl grasps: 
(a) the ring; or (b) the net. 

Ruling: in both (a) and (b) a technical foul is charged to 
Bl for grasping the basket. The net is part of the basket. The 
indication of the foul, however, does not cause the ball to be- 
come dead until there is evidence that the basket attempt is 
either successful or unsuccessful. Immediately after it is deter- 
mined whether the attempt will be successful, the ball will be- 



come dead. If the attempt has been successful, a field goal is 
scored. Any player of team A may attempt the free throw for 
the technical foul following which team A will be awarded the 
ball out of bounds for a throw-in on either side opposite the 
center circle. 

26. Play: During a dribble, Al bats the ball over the head 
of his opponent, Bl, in a high arc, runs around Bl to where 
the ball comes to the floor behind Bl, and continues to drib- 
ble. Al comes to the spot on the floor exactly where the ball 
comes down to the floor. 

Ruling: Legal. Al may continue to dribble. The item (c) 
of 4-7 which provides the dribble ends when "the dribbler is 
unable to immediately catch or continue to dribble the ball" 
refers to those acts in which the dribbler loses control of the 
ball, thereby, not enabling him to give direction to it. In order 
to be a dribbler, he must have control and when he puts the 
ball to the floor at a spot intended and this is by design or plan, 
the dribble is not ended. The coverage referred to in item (c) 
implies loss of control and when control is lost, it is no longer 
a dribble and therefore, the dribble must have ended. 

27. Play: Al, A2, A3, A4, and A5 are participation in the 
game when the first half terminates. Without reporting during 
the half, A6 and A7 replace A4 and A5. The tapped jump 
ball, which begins the third" quarter, is secured by Al, 
who dribbles into his front court. The officials are then noti- 
fied that A6 and A7 did not report: 

Ruling: A6 and A7 commit fouls when they do not report 
during the intermission. However, their infractions are ignored 
because after the ball becomes alive and the clock starts, it is 
too late to penalize for these- fouls which were committed 
during a dead ball period. 

2S. Play: During a field goal attempt and while the ball is 
in flight, Bl slaps the backboard, causing it to vibrate. The ball 
subsequently strikes the backboard and/or the basket ring and 
very nearly enters the basket. However, it does not. 

Ruling: A technical foul is charged to B 1 for causing the 
backboard to vibrate. No field goal may be awarded in this 
situation. It is not basket interference, which would be a vio- 
lation. The infraction depicted in the play is a technical fouL 
Should the live ball enter the basket, even though the tech- 
nical foul has been indicated by the official while the ball is in 
flight, it would have been a live ball which entered the basket 
and, therefore, the goal would be scored. 

29. Play: For ajump ball, A2 and A3 take positions on the 
restraining circle. B4 and B5 line up directly behind A2 and 
A3 and within 3 feet of the jump circle. 

Ruling: Violations by B4 and B5. 

Comment: Dimensions of the spaces around the jump cir- 
cle are comparable to those of the spaces along the free throw 
lane which are 3 feet wide and 3 feet deep. Only one player 
may occupy each space until the ball is tapped. In the instant 
situation, B4 and B5 violate because they have taken positions 
in spaces already occupied. It is true that the rules book does 
not provide specific coverage supporting this interpretation. 
However, the support is implied and the interpretation is 
official 

30. Play: During the bonus free throw attempt by Al, 
Bl backs out of free throw lane space number 3: (a) before; 
or (b) after the ball touches the ring or the backboard or the 
free throw ends. 

Ruling: Violation in (a). Legal action by Bl in (b). In (a), 
if the try is successful, the goal counts and the violation is 
(Continued on Page Twelve) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY 1970 



FEBRUARY, 1970 VOL. XXXII-NO. 7 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 40501 

Second class postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Ralph C. Do rsey (1966-70), Horse Cave 

Vice-President ... Foster J. Sanders (1966-70), Louisville 
Directors- Morton Combs (1 968-72), Carr Creek; W. H. Crow- 
dus (1968-71), Franklin; Don Davis (1967-71), Independ- 
ence; James T. Dotson (1968-72), Pikeville, Lee T. Mills 
(1969-73), Frankfort: Richard Vincent (1969-73). Morgan- 
field - Subscription Rate $1.00 per Year 



-fiom the Commissionei s (Jffi 



ice 



1970 District Tournament Sites 



1. Fulton 

2. Paducah Tilghman 

3. Wingo 

4. Murray University 

5. Caldwell County 

6. Henderson County 

7. West Hopkins 

8. Hopkinsville 

9. Daviess County 

10. Muhlenberg Central 

11. Ohio County 

12. Leitchfield 

13. Russellville 

14. Warren East 

15. Glasgow 

16. Tompkinsville 

17. North Hardin 

18. LaRue County 

19. Bardstown 

20. Campbellsville 

21. Central 

22. Butler 

23. Doss 

24. Southern 

25. St. Xavier 

26. Trinity 

27. Fern Creek 

28. Waggener 

29. Taylorsville 

30. Henry County 

31. Carroll County 

32. Owen County 



33. Boone County 

34. Holmes 

35. Newport Catholic 

36. Highlands 

37. Bourbon County 

38. Pendleton 

39. Mason County 

40. George Rogers Clark 

41. Good Shepherd 

42. Mercer County 

43. Henry Clay 

44. Model Laboratory 

45. Boyle County 

46. Russell County 

47. Somerset 

48. London 

49. Jackson County 

50. Whitley County 

51. Bell County 

52. Harlan 

53. Whitesburg 

54. Hazard 

55. Knott County 

56. Wolfe County 

57. Warfield 

58. Ma'-town 

59. Dorton 

60. Elkhorn City 

61. University Breckinridge 

62. Hitchins 

63. Raceland 

64. Paul G. Blazer 



STATE SWIMMING MEETS 

The 1970 Class AAA State High School Swimming Meet 
will be held at the Plantation Swim Club pool, Louisville, on 
February 27-28, the Class AA meet at the University of Ken- 
tucky pool, Lexington, on April 3-4. The meet for girls will 
be held on Friday at each location, beginning at 1:00 P.M.; 
the meet for boys on Saturday, beginning at 9:00 A.M. 

Class AAA will include those high schools with an enroll- 
ment of 900 or more (grades 10-12), and Class AA will in- 
clude those schools wi;h an enrollment of less than 900. All- 
male or all-female schools with an enrollment of 450 or more 
are placed in Class AAA. General regulations concerning the 
meets appear in the K.H.S.A.A. booklet. All rules appearing 
in the 1970 scholastic section of- the N.C.A.A. Swimming 



Guide will be followed unless there is some difference be- 
tween these regulations and those adopted by the Board of 
Control. In such an event, K. H.S.A.A. rules will prevail. 

Only those swimmers who qualify for the finals will be 
given expense allowances for transportation, lodging, and 
meals. 

Schools sponsoring boys' teams in swimming are: Atherton, 
Ballard, Beechwood, Boone Co., Bowling Green, Bryan Stat- 
ion, C ampb el l Co. , Covi ngton Catholic, Dixie Heights, Eastern, 
Fern CTBeT, rTJrT KrlOX, J36SS SnepneTtl, Henry Clay, High- 
lands, Hopkinsville, Kentucky Military Institute, Lafayette, 
Louisville Country Day, Model Laboratory, Murray, Newport, 
Newport Catholic, Oneida Institute, Paducah Tilghman, Paul 
G. Blazer, St. Xavier, Seneca, Shelbyville, Simon Kenton, 
TatesXreelt, Trinity, University Breckinridge, Waggener, West- 
port, Woodford County. 

Schools sponsoring girl's teams are: Ballard, Beechwood, 
Bourbon County, Bowling Green, Bryan Station, Dixie 
Heights, Eastern, Fern Creek, Fort Knox, Henry Clay, High- 
lands, Hopkinsville, Jeffersontown, Lafayette, Model Labor- 
atory, Murray, Newport, Norte Dame Academy, Paducah 
Tilghman, Paul G. Blazer, Sacred Heart Academy, Seneca, 
Shelbyville, Tates Creek, University Breckinridge, Villa Ma- 
donna Academy, Waggener, Westport, Woodford County. 

1 970 Regional Tournament Sites 

(1) Murray State University, (2) Madisonville-North Hop- 
kins High School, (3) Owensboro Sportscenter, (4) Western 
Kentucky University, (5) Hart County High School, (6) 
Freedom Hall, (7) Freedom Hall, (8) Henry County High 
School, (9) Holmes High School, (10) Mason County High 
School, (11) U.K. Coliseum, (12) Boyle County High School, 
(13) Knox Central High School, (14) Breathitt County High 
School, (15) Prestonsburg High School, (16) Morehead State 
University. 



APPROVED OFFICIALS 

Since the list of Approved officials appeared in the Jan- 
uary issue of the ATHLETE, two additional officials have 
qualified for the higher ratings. They are Jack H. Hardin and 
WesLillie. 

Minutes of Board Meeting 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky High School Ath- 
letic Association met at the Kentucky Hotel, Louisville, on 
Saturday morning, January 24, 1970. The meeting was called 
to order by President Ralph C. Dorsey at 8:30, with all Board 
Members, Commissioner Theo. A. Sanford, and Assistant 
Commissioners J. B. Mansfield and Billy V. Wise present. The 
invocation was given by James T. Dotson. 

Don Davis moved, seconded by W. H. Crowdus, that the 
reading of the minutes of the December 20th meeting be 
waived since the members of the Board had received copies 
of these minutes. The motion was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner recommended that the following re- 
gulations concerning the fees for district and regional basket- 
ball tournament officials be adopted; The district tourna- 
ment official shall receive a fee of $25.00 per game, the re- 
gional tournament official a fee of $30.00 per game. The 
transportation allowance shall be 10 cents per mile for all 
necessary travel. In the event that it is necessary for the of- 
ficial to remain overnight at the tournament site, he shall be 
paid an additional $20.00 per day for lodging and meals. 
Tom Mills moved, seconded by Richard Vincent, that the re- 
gulations recommended by the Commissioner be adopted. 
The motion was carried unanimously. 

There was a discussion of possible new proposals to be 
submitted by the Board at the forthcoming 1970 Delegate 
Assembly. No action was taken on these proposals at this 
time. 

Chairman Foster J. Sanders of the Retirement Committee 
presented to the Board a list of the objectives of his commit- 
tee witfc respect to an improved retirement program for As- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY 1970 



Page Three 



sociation employees. These objections are as follows: 

1. To make the retirement program for executives com- 
parable with the Teachers Retirement System; 

2. To take into consideration the present non-contribution 
of the executives toward the insurance part of the present 
program; 

3. To improve the present retirement program for clerical 
employees; 

4. To sign contractual agreements with the executives, pro- 
viding for minimum monthly payments from the K.H.S.A.A. 
Retirement Fund to supplement Social Security payments 
and insurance annuities; 

5. To recommend adequate funding of the improved pro- 
gram. 

Mr. Sanders moved, seconded by James T. Dotson, that 
the Board of Control accept as Board policy the retirement 
program objectives which his committed nad presented. The 
motion was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner reported to the Board certain contracts 
which he had made by direction of the Building Committee 
with respect to a site for the proposed new K.H.S.A.A. build- 
ing. Chairman Don Davis of the Building Committee indicated 
to the Board the building site which was his committee's 
first choice, and all members of the Board concurred with this 
selection. The Building Committee was directed to proceed in 
implementing a plan by which the present fair market values 
of the properties involved might be involved. 

President Ralph C. Dorsey gave a report on the 1970 mid- 
winter National Federation Conference, held at St. Charles, 
Illinois. 

Assistant Commissioner Billy V. Wise gave a report on 
some of the football rules changes for 1970. 

James T. Dotson moved, seconded by Morton Combs, 
that all bills or the Association for the period beginning Dec- 
ember 1, 1969, and ending December 31, 1969, be allowed. 
The motion was carried unanimously. 

There being no further business, the meeting adjourned. 

TRACK ASSIGNMENTS 

Track regulations adopted by the Board of Control pro- 
vide that the state shall be divided into classes and regions by 
the Commissioner who will assign the schools to the regional 
sites. For the first time, there are three classes in Girls' Track. 
The 1970 assignments are as follows; 

TRACK-CLASS A GIRLS 

Paducah Region-Ballard, Crittenden County, Lyon County, 
Murray, Murray University, Providence, Reidland, St. Mary, 
South Marshall, Trigg County. 

Bowling Green Region-Austin Tracy, Cumberland County, 
Metcalfe County, Park City, Russellville, Temple Hill, Tomp- 
kinsville. 

Fort Knox Region-Holy Name, Hughes-Kirk, Kentucky 
School for the Blind, West Hopkins. 

Boone County Region- Bellevue, Dayton, Henry County, 
Ludlow, Silver Grove, Trimble County. 

Lexington Region-Frankfort, Harrodsburg, Lexington Cat- 
holic, Lincoln, Paris, Sayre. . 

Richmond Region-Boyle County, Burgin, Burnside, Haz- 
ard, Hindman, Kentucky School for the Deaf, Monticello, 
Oneida. 

Barbourville Region-Bush, Corbin, Fleming-Neon, Harlan, 
London, Lynn Camp, St. Camillus, Williamsburg. 

Morehead Region-Bath County, Elkhorn City, Maysville, 
Mullins, Paintsville, Prichard, University Breckinridge, Wurt- 

land " TRACK-CLASS AA GIRLS 

Paducah Region-Calloway County, Christian County, Hop- 
kinsville, Lone Oak. North Marshall, Paducah. 

Henderson County Region-Daviess County, Henderson, 
Henderson County, Madisonville-North Hopkins, Owensboro, 
Union County. 

Bowling Green Region-Adair County, Bowling Green, 
Franklin County, Franklin-Simpson, Glasgow, Greensburg, 
J^ussell County, Warren Central. 

Fort Knox Region-Breckinridge County, East Hardin, Fort 
Knox, Meade County, Nelson County, North Hardin, Oldham 
County, Shelby County, Shopville. 

Boone County Region-Boone County, Campbell County, 



Carroll County, Newport, Pendleton County, Simon Kenton. 

Lexington Region-Bourbon County, Bryan Station, Frank- 
lin County, Harrison County, Henry Clay, Lafayette, Scott 
County, Tates Creek, Woodford County. 

Richmond Region-Danville, Knox Central, M. C. Napier, 
Madison Central, Middlesboro, Montgomery County, Somer- 
set. 

Morehead Region-Boyd County, Fleming County, Johnson 
Central, Louisa, Mason County, Paul G. Blazer, Prestonsburg, 
Rowan County, Russetl. 

TRACK-CLASS AAA GIRLS 

Butler Region-Ahrens Trade, Butler, Central, Loretto, 
Louisville Male, Shawnee. 

Atherton Region-Durrett, Fairdale, Holy Rosary, Jeffer- 
sontown, Moore, Sacred Heart. 

Iroquois Region-Angela Merici, Doss, Iroquois, Jesse 
Stuart, Valley, Western. 

Eastern Region-Assumption, Eastern, Fern Creek, Mercy 
Academy, Seneca, Ursuline, Westport. 

TRACK-CLASS A BOYS 

Paducah Region-Crittenden County, Fort Campbell, Ful- 
ton, Heath, Lyon County, Murray, Murray University, Pro- 
vidence, Reidland, St. Mary, South Marshall, Trigg County. 

Bowling Green Region-Austin Tracy, Bremen, Caverna, 
Cumberland County, Gamaliel, Hiseville, Metcalfe County, 
Park City, Russellville, Temple Hill, Tompkinsville, University. 

Fort Knox Region- Bardstown, Campbellsville, Clarkson, 
Frederick-Fraize, Ky. Military Institute, Kentucky School for 
the Blind, Lebanon, Leitchfield, Louisville Country Day, Port- 
land Christian, St. Augustine, West Hardin. 

Boone County Region-Bellevue, Dayton, Eminence, Grant 
County, Henry County, Ludlow, Nicholas County, Owen 
County, Trimble County. 

Lexington Region-Frankfort, Georgetown, Harrodsburg, 
Lexington Catholic, Lincoln, Mercer, Millersburg Military 
Institute, Paris, Shelbyville. 

Richmond Region-Berea, Burgin, Burnside, Garrard Coun- 
ty, Hazard, Jackson, Kentucky School for the Deaf, Leather- 
wood, Model, Monticello, Mt. Sterling, Oakdale Christian, 
Oneida Institute, Shopville, Stanford. 

Barbourville Region-Bush, Corbin, Fleming-Neon, Harlan, 
Hazel Green, Jenkins, Letcher, London, Lone Jack, Lily, Lynn 
Camp, Pineville, Riverside Christian, Williamsburg. 

Morehead Region-Bath County, Breckinridge University, 
Elkhorn City, Fairview, Feds Creek, Johns Creek, Maysville, 
Menifee County, Millard, Morgan County, Mullins, Paintsville, 
Phelps, Pikeville, Prichard, Raceland, Virgie, Wurtland. 
TRACK-CLASS AA BOYS 

Paducah Region-Caldwell County, Calloway County, Chris- 
tian County, Hopkinsville, Lone Oak, Mayfield, North Mar- 
shall, Paducah. 

Henderson Region-Daviess County, Henderson, Henderson 
County, Madisonville-North Hopkins, Ohio County, Owens- 
boro, Owensboro Catholic, Union County, Webster County. 

Bowling Green Region-Adair County, Bowling Green, But- 
ler County, Franklin-Simpson, Glasgow, Greensburg, Hart 
County, LaRue County, Russell County, Taylor County, Todd 
Central, Wayne County. 

Fort Knox Region-Breckinridge County, East Hardin, Eliz- 
abethtown. Fort Knox, Meade County, Nelson County, North 
Hardin. Oldham County, Shelby County, Shepherdsville. 

Boone County Region-Boone County, Brossart, Campbell 
County, Carroll County, Covington Catholic, Dixie Heights, 
Highlands, Holmes, Lloyd, Newport, Newport Catholic, 
Simon-Kenton. 

Lexington Region-Bourbon County, Bryan Station, Frank- 
lin County, George R. Clark, Harrison County, Henry Clay, 
Jessamine County, Lafayette, Pendleton County, Scott Coun- 
ty, Tates Creek, Washington County, Woodford County. 

Richmond Region-Bell County, Boyle County, Danville, 
Estill County, Knox Central, Madison Central, M. C. Napier, 
Middlesboro, Montgomery County, Somerset, Whitesburg. 

Morehead Region-Boyd County, Fleming County, Johnson 
Central, Louisa, McKell, Mason County, Paul G. Blazer, Pres- 
tonsburg, Rowan County, Russell. 

TRACK-CLASS AAA BOYS 

Flaget Region-Butler, Central, duPont Manual. Klaget, 
Louisville Male, Shawnee. 

Atherton Region-Atherton, DeSales, Durrett, Moore, St. 
Xavier, Southern, Thomas Jefferson. 

Iroquois Region-Bishop David, Doss, Fairdale, Iroquois, 
Pleasure Ridge Park, Stuart, Valley, Western. 

Eastern Region-Ballard, Eastern, Fern Creek, Jefferson- 
town, Seneca, Trinity, Waggener, Westport. 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY 1970 



Athletic Specialization 

by Clifford B. Fagan 

INTERSCHOLASTIC ATHLETICS ORIGINATED as a re- 
sult of student body interest and support. In the beginning, 
faculties were very skeptical about accepting athletics into the 
school program. This reluctance was due simply to the fact 
that athletics at that time were not considered to be educa- 
tional. It was not even acknowledged that they had educa- 
tional potential. As a matter of fact, most school authorities 
believed schools would be much better off without programs 
of football, basketball, baseball, and track and field. 

AS EDUCATORS RECOGNIZED the unique educational 
opportunities provided by properly supervised interscholas- 
tics, they also realized that athletics inherently invite exploit- 
ation of both the participant and the school program. It was 
immediately acknowledged that without proper safeguards 
abuses inevitably result. Therefore, the faculties, after ac- 
cepting interscholastic athletics as an integral part of the pro- 
gram, formulated the standards necessary to protect it. For 
this purpose, schools joined together in state associations, and 
standards were adopted, along with a means of enforcement 

THE STANDARDS ESTABLISHED have, down through 
the years, protected the participants. The standards have enab- 
led boys to take part in broad programs and to sample sports 
of their choice. Those taking part in football were not ex- 
ploited in a program which continued from September 1st o' 
one year to September 1st of the next. Basketball coache 
have not been able to practice the year around, nor have they 
been able to schedule 45 or 50 games during a season, thereby 
preventing the basketball player, and sometimes even the 
school, from taking part in any other activities, no matter how 
worthwhile the other activities may be. The responsibility of 
education the whole boy was accepted as being more import- 
ant than training him to kick a football as far as he possibly 
could, or to throw the baseball harder than anyone else, or to 
jump the highest in the state. Concentration on specialization 
was recognized to reduce the possibility of athletics making 
their maximum contribution to the whole of the individual. 

THE DEFENSIVE COMPLAINT OF COACHES that cer- 
tain students specialize in math or music, for example, to the 
exclusion of taking part in other activities, may, in some in- 
stances, have validity. However, the fact that there is abuse 
here and that the student's time is stolen by other activities 
does not in any way justify athletics for taking the same ill- 
advised and irresponsible course. Interscholastics have pro- 
spered because of the high standards under which they are 
conducted. These standards have assured the r- rticipant that 
athletics are contributing to his growth and di -lopment, as 
was intended when athletics were accepted into tne school 
program. 

IT CANNOT BE DENIED that sr xialization narrows the 
development of individuals both mentally and physically. In- 
terscholastics must not contribute to this miscarriage of the 
educational program. To the contrary, participants and all 
high school students should have an opportunity to'take part 
in a broad program, and the standards themselves should pro- 
tect the boys and girls from exploitation which attends spec- 
ialization. Specialization takes its greatest toll from those who 
do not reach their ultimate goal, but neither does special- 
ization properly reward those who do. 

IF WE ARE TO BE FORTHRIGHT, we must recognize 
that some place along the way we have lost sight of our true 
objectives. Many of those who have been responsible for the 
determination of athletic policies have removed the protection 
originally given the participant from exploitation. The em- 
phasis for using athletics as an educational tool has diminished, 
and increased attention is devoted to athletic accomplishment, 
be it winning or the ultimate in performance, lor the most 
part, these abuses are found in the programs of individual 
sports. These activities have become increasingly popular. They 
are, in effect, "Johnny come lately." and the programs do not 
have the original protection. Sometimes there is a mistaken 
feeling on the part of coaches that the principles which guide 
the program for team sports have no application in the case of 



individual activities. Appropriate standards serve as pro- 
tection in both situations. 

AS A RESULT of total dedication to winning and with 
greater emphasis on record establishment, there is more con- 
cern for the performance than there is for the performer. This 
attitude is frequently reflected by specialists, who, because of 
their overwhelming interest in the skill, lose their educational 
perspective. Communities and parents are all too often un- 
familiar with the educational potential of athletics, and they, 
too, recognize only winning and championships. In order to be 
assured of winning, the coaches specialize more and more. The 
high school athlete is required not only to devote long hours 
of practice during the sports season, but he must go to sum- 
mer camps and to special schools, frequently at the cost of 
both time and money, not only to him but to his family and 
community as well. The athlete must specialize so he qualifies 
for a college scholarship. The mistaken attitude that it is the 
responsibility of the schools to develop world champions in 
every sport so our country can dominate international com- 
petition is popular. While we are pointing to our sports suc- 
cesses, we forget about the number of boys who have been 
adversely affected by such programs and find out only too 
late that they have made a great personal sacrifice for which 
there is no reward. 

IT IS VERY TRUE that times change. As a result, ob- 
jectives change. This principle applies to education, as well as 
to other aspects of our culture. To keep in tune, state associa- 
tions must periodically review their standards. The National 
Federation has long advocated the necessity of such reviews. 
Those policies and "procedures which have become outmoded 
and which no longer accomplish their purpose or serve their 
need must be revised. 

THEREFORE. 11 IS PROPER to ask the question, "Is it 
the purpose of today's school athletic program to make cer- 
tain that football stars, or international swimming champions, 
or national gymnastics champions are produced?" Or is it 
appropriate to ask, "Are the schools obligated to take mea- 
sures to insure that boys who play football also develop into 
well rounded citizens, both while in school and after their 
playing days are over?" The question remains, "Are school 
administrators meeting the challenge and are limitations which 
were established for justifiable reasons being broken down be- 
cause of pressures by those who do not recognize them or by 
those who are willing to sacrifice a boy or the school pro- 
gram in the interest of winning championships, outstanding 
performances, and temporary recognition?" 

SCHOOL OFFICIALS ARE TODAY, as they were three 
decades ago, responsible for protecting the interests of those 
participating in athletic programs. We emphasize that the pur- 
pose of athletics has not changed, nor will it change, nor 
should it change. Players must not be exploited. Programs in 
the schools must not be misused. Even though pressures have 
increased during the several decades, even though there is 
greater emphasis on winning, and even though national and 
world championships appear to be more important, these facts 
do not in any way absolve the school administrators from do- 
ing the job they have accepted. 

PRESSURES ON THE ADMINISTRATOR today are 
greater than they have ever been. This makes those responsible 
for protecting the boy and the school from exploitation have 
a more difficult task. The easy way is to remove the protect- 
ion and let both the boy and the school be victimized. How- 
ever, the challenge must be met. It must be met head-on. 

THE TRUE EDUCATOR will, in the future, we are cer- 
tain, take pride in identifying with boys and girls who are 
better citizens because they have had an opportunity to par- 
ticipate in inter-school activities. We doubt that an educator 
will believe he has done his job if, because of his laxity, a 
champion performer has been shortchanged in the other as- 
pects of his education. The dedicated educator will take pride 
in the fact thai he has administered an athletic program, 
participation in which enabled the boys and girls to emerge 
as better educated citizens. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCE^OL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY 1970 



Page Five 



Football Officials' Ratings On Sportsmanship Of 
K. K. S. A. A. Member Schools - 1969 



Allen County 29 

Anderson County 42 

Atherton 36 

Ballard 8 

Bardstown. 39 

Bath County 35 

Beechwood 22 

Belfry 31 

Bell County 31 

Bellevue 41 

Berea Community 17 

Bishop David 26 

Boone County 29 

Bourbon County 26 

Bowling Green 30 

Boyd County 38 

Boyle County 40 

Breckinridge County 28 

Bryan Station 45 

Burgin 13 

Butler 39 

Butler County 27 

Caldwell County 51 

Campbell County. 33 

Campbellsville 15 

Carroll County 20 

Catlettsburg 40 

Caverna 20 

Central 15 

Christian County 36 

Corbin 53 

Covington Catholic 15 

Crittenden County 31 

Cumberland 36 

Cumberland County 18 

Danville 38 

Daviess County 16 

Dayton 33 

DeSales 28 

Dixie Heights: : : 38 

Doss 38 

duPont Manual 44 

Durrett 35 

Eastern ""6 

Elizabethtown 42 

Elkhorn City 33 

Eminence 27 

Evarts 23 

Fairdale 30 

Fern Creek 33 

Flaget 29 

Fleming County 33 

Fleming Neon 24 

Fort Cambell 26 

Fort Knox- 20 

Frankfort 29 

Franklin County 40 

Franklin Simpson 14 

Fulton 26 

Fulton County 16 

Gamaliel 13 

Garrard County 34 

George Rogers Clark 34 

Georgetown 34 

Glasgow 37 

Greensburg 26 

Harlan ii 

Harrison County 34 

Harrodsburg ,• - ■ 30 

Hazard. '. . . 25 

Hazel Green 25 

Henderson 14 

Henderson County 30 

Henry Clay 31 



COACH 
G F 



OTHER SCHOOL 
OFFICIALS 



30 
34 



32 
45 



Page Six THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY 1970 



Henry County 20 12 4 3 22 

Highlands 33 13 1 38 

Hiseville 12 7 15 

Holmes 25 9 5 1 28 

Hopkinsville 35 13 2 4 43 

Iroquois 28 13 2 5 33 

James A. Cawood 25 10 1 3 29 

Jeffersontown 34 9 34 

Jenkins 31 6 3 34 

Jessamine County 25 9 3 4 34 

Jesse Stuart 2 5 2 1 5 

Johns Creek 45 3 44 

Ky. Military Institute 27 8 1 32 

Kentucky School for Deaf 16 15 

Knox Central 34 1 32 

Lafayette 30 17 1 1 36 

LaRue County 31 8 30 

Lebanon 23 9 2 3 29 

Leslie County 30 10 1 31 

Lewis County 18 4 17 

Lily 17 7 2 3 22 

Lloyd 28 11 2 32 

London 33 4 31 

Lone Oak , . 20 5 1 23 

Louisa 32 8 32 

Louisville Country Day 16 8 5 2 18 

Louisville Male 26 11 1 23 

Ludlow 11 15 8 9 26 

Lynch 34 9 2 2 38 

Lynn Camp 23 4 3 24 

McKeU 11 7 3 12 28 

Madison 24 12 4 27 

Madison Central 36 10 5 40 

Madisonville-N. Hopkins 27 12 2 2 35 

Marion C. Moore 5 4 1 4 

Mayfield 36 7 1 39 

MaysviUe 28 9 30 

M. C. Napier 19 4 7 7 25 

Meade County 23 8 3 3 26 

Mercer County 29 6 2 35 

Metclafe County 37 6 34 

Middlesboro 27 11 1 1 34 

Millersburg Military Institute ... 38 70 40 

Montgomery County. 22 20 2 5 37 

Morgan County 21 7 2 3 24 

Mt. Sterling 43 7 3 46 

Mt. Vernon 21 1 21 

Mullins 22 10 26 

Murray 35 35 

Nelson County 26 9 3 2 29 

Newport 19 13 4 3 29 

Newport Catholic 8 6 2 11 

Nicholas County 29 5 30 

North Hardin 32 7 35 

North Marshall 32 3 32 

Ohio County 27 13 33 

Oldham County 28 17 1 31 

Owen County 34 5 1 34 

Owensboro 32 10 35 

Owensboro Catholic 29 8 2 34 

Paducah Tilghman 32 6 35 

Paintsvilie 29 8 28 

Paris 34 10 1 38 

Park City 11 7 IS 

Paul G. Blazer 31 20 7 4 44 

Pikeville 24 16 3 1 27 

Pineville 37 4 1 39 

Pleasure Ridge Park 25 11 4 2 25 

Prestonsburg 28 8 29 

Raceland 22 10 2 31 

Rowan County 29 10 1 31 

RusselL 43 10 47 

Russell County 16 4 15 

Russellville 33 6 35 

St. Xavier 44 14 43 

Sayre 22 3 21 

Scott County 24 13 4 4 34 

Seneca 24 15 3 25 

Shawnee 19 14 3 2 24 

Shelby County 27 8 1 3 28 

Shelbyville 34 8 35 

Shepherdsville 27 17 1 1 34 

Simon Kenton 30 14 2 32 

Somerset 24 6 5 10 30 

Southern 30 11 5 1 30 

Stanford 38 3 1 38 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY 1970 



Page Seven 



JTates Creek _. 26 

Temple Hill 14 

Thomas Jefferson 25 

Todd Central 9 

Tompkinsville. 39 

Trigg County 34 

Trinity 27 

Union County 33 

Valley 36 

Virgie 25 

Waggener 29 

Warren Central 23 

Warren East 11 

Washington County 32 

Wayne County 16 

Western 38 

Westport 19 

Wheelwright 22 

Whitesburg 28 

Whitley County 36 

Williamsburg 31 

Woodford County 35 

Wurtland 28 



47) 



Schools' Ratings On 
Football Officials 



The following ratings were received on football officials 
registered with the K.H.S.A.A. during 1969-1970. The num- 
bers following each name represent respectively the number 
of Excellent, Good, Fair, and Poor ratings given to the of- 
ficial. 

Acree, Aaron, 0-1-0-0; Adams, Michael, 0-4-0-0; Aniens, 
James, 0-3-1-0; Albright, James R., 6-4-2-1; Allen, Arthur, 0- 
6-0-0; Allison, Roy, 4-5-3-0; Anders, Raleigh, 6-104-2; An- 
derson, Glenn S., Jr., 2-3-1-0; Anderson, John G., 2-7-2-0; 
Ashworth, Paul, 0-1-0-0; Ayers, Edward L., 7-3-0-0; 

Bartels, John T., 4-3-2-1; Batterson, Keith, 0-3-0-0; Be- 
heler, Donald S., 6-9-1-1; Bell, Clarence T., 1-5-0-4; Bennett, 
Howard, 7-3-0-0; Benzinger, Joseph, Jr., 0-4-0-0; Bero, James 
J., 1-3-1-1; Blanton, Homer, 2-4-0-0; Blevins, Donald W., 0-1- 
0-0; Boemker, Bob, 2-6-0-0; Bordy, Philip, 6-4-1-1; Boswell, 
Martin, 8-5-0-0; Bourne, Pugrl, 0-2-1-0; Bowman, Earl G., 7-5- 
2-0; Boyles, Jerry, 2-1-0-0; Bradford, Robert, 5-8-0-2; Bram- 
ble, James, 5-9-0-0; Brashear, Loy Ray, 5-6-0-0; Brauch, Char- 
les J., 0-3-0-1; Brock, Alben, 4-6-1-1; Brotzge, Maurice J., 3- 
10-1-1; Brown, Bill, 9-10-0-2" Brown, Herman G., 7-6-2-1; 
Brown, John Scoop, 4-0-0-0; Bullock, Ted., 4-6-1-4; Burgess, 
Oley, 2-0-0-0; Burke, David, 3-7-2-4; Burke, Harry R., 1 1-6- 
1-0; Burkhart, James G., 0-3-1-0; Burton, John, 0-9-1-0; Bur- 
ton, James, 7-5-1-0; 

Cain, Paul D., 3-3-1-2; Calitri, Don L., 2-8-3-1; Callihan, 
Billy Joe, 1-0-0-0; Canaday, Glenn, 8-10-1-0; Canady, Ray, 
7-6-2-1; Cannon, Jerry, 0-1-1-0; Carlberg, John H., 8-5-0-0; 
Carlberg, Ralph C, 5-10-0-0; Carlson, David A, 0-1-1-0; Carr, 
Billy W., 0-4-0-0; Cecil, Morris, 8-3-0-0; Cecil, Roger, 0-0-1-1; 
Chiswell, Charles L, 0-3-0-0; Cisco, Robert N., 2-6-2-! ; Clark, 
Charles L, 0-9-4-0; Clark, Owen B., 3-5-0-0; Clark, Robert L., 
4-6-2-1 ; Clemmons, Samuel P., 8-5-0-0; Cochran, Roy H, 1-0- 
0-0; Collins, Ronald K., 2-10-2-0; Cook, Jack W., 1-0-0-0; 
Cook, Richard N., 4-6-2-1 ; Cooper, Norris E., 0-0-1-0; Cop- 
ley, Sidney, 1-2-1-0; Coppler, Arden D., 0-1-0-0; Cornwell, 
James, 2-6-0-1; Cowan, R. L., 0-4-1-0; Craft, Albert B., 7-9-0- 
0;Crager, Bobby F., 1-1-3-4; Craig, Louis, 0-2-0-0; Creekmore, 
Les, 1-3-0-0; Crider, Ray, 6-5-1-2; Cullum, Harold D., 1-1-0-0; 
Culp, Willard E., 5-9-0-0; Curnutte, Ivan M., 2-1-1-0; Current, 
Ellis Ray, 4-4-2-1; 

Dallman, James W v 2-5-0-0; Daniels, Robert M.. 2-2-1-0; 
Daopoulos, James A., 1-2-0-0; Davis Charles, 0-4-0-0; Davis, 
Curt, 6-9-3-1; Davis, Ralph C, 1-2-0-0; Deaton, Daniel E., 2- 
1-0-0; Delaney, William T., 2-2-2-0; Dennedy, Robert T., 0-4- 



0-0; Dent, Donald L., 2-8-0-0; Denton, Charles, 5-3-0-0; Den- 
ton, William J., 2-11-2-0; Detenber, Gene H, 3-7-2-3; Devine, 
Edward, 0-1-1-0; Dial, Charles, 0-0-0-2; Dial, Jack W., 0-0-0-2; 
Dixie, C. P., 0-2-1-1; Downey, Robert F., 0-1-0-0; Downs, 
Joseph, 0-4-0-1; Drake, Richard R., 1 1-4-0-0; Draud, Jon E., 
5-4-0-0; Dryden, Wallace L., 5-5-1-0; Duff, Earl, 0-1-1-0; Duff, 
Thomas, 0-2-0-1; Duff, William C, 5-4-0-1; Durbin, Roy V., 
0-0-1-0; Durkin, Jack, 7-6-0-0; 

Egan, Joseph P., 2-6-0-1; Eldridge, Wayne, 3-1-4-2; Elliott, 
Carroll, 8-1 1-1-2; Ellis, Johnny, 1-3-4-4; Elovitz, Carl, 7-8-0-1 ; 
Ernst, Edward R., 4-5-2-3; 

Faust, John, 3-11-4-0; Fay, John C, 6-9-1-2; Feck, Rich- 
ard A., 6-5-0-0; Fenimore, Clarke, 1-13-2-0; Fer^rson, Roy, 
1-10-3-2; Ferguson, Thomas L., 2-0-0-0; Fesmire, herald, 0-2- 
0-0; Fields, Rickey, 0-2-0-0; Fields, Ronald M., 2->-0-0; Fish, 
Leland Gilbert, 8-4-0-0; Fitzpatrick, Ken, 1-11- -2; Flynn, 
Bobby, 4-7-0-1; Fortney, Robert Lee, 4-16-2-0; Foster, Ber- 
ryman. 4-0-0-0; Foster, J. W., 7-5-0-1; Fraley, Bill, 3-4-2-1; 
Frankel, Louis, 1-12-1-0; Franklin, Clifford, 1-2-0-0; Frazer; 
Tom Roe, 2-1-0-0; Fryrear. Bill P., 6-7-1-2; Fucci, Dominic, 
7-5-1-4; Fuller, Wilton, 7-4-1-1; 

Gallaher, Jack, 1-6-1-0; Garrett, Richard, 6-6-2-0; Gentry. 
Dale J., 4-8-5-2; Gettler. John F., 5-7-0-4; GfeU, George, 7-6- 
0-2; Goforth, Bob, 0-3-1-0; Golden, Billy J., 4-7-0-0; Gore, 
Bailey, 5-4-0-2; Gorham, Harry C, 6-6-3-0; Gour, Bob, 5-4-1- 
0; Grace, Charles K., 8-4-0-1; G^ace, H. E., 4-6-l-l;Graham, 
James, 2-2-0-0; Griggs, John, 7-2-1-0; Gupton, George, 0-5-0- 
0;Gupton, Lawrence, 0-5-1-0; Guy, Newton, 0-5-0-0; 

Hadden, Newell P., 11-7-0-0; Hagan, Joe E., 9-10-4-0; 
Hagy, Harold J., 0-1-0-0; Hall, Charles E., 4-7-1-0; HaU, Wil- 
liam, 2-4-0-0; Hamilton, Mike D., 0-4-0-0; Hammons, J. S., 
0-6-0-0; Hancock, Norb, 2-9-0-0; Haney, Bill, 0-3-0-0; Harjo, 
Austin A., 4-4-0-1; Harris, David L., 0-4-1-0; Harris, Jerry, 5- 
5-1-0; Harsh, Ronald B., 1-1-0-0; Hawkins, Donald H., 7-9-0- 
0; Hawkins, Will A., 5-8-0-0; Heaberlin, Bill, 2-2-0-0; Hedge, 
David William, 3-13-2-1; Heinichen. Carl C, 3-1-0-0; Heinold, 
F. Thomas, 1-2-2-0; Hcinze, Frank, 1 1-5-2-0; Hendon. L. J., 
4-1-1-1; Herrick, Calvin P., 0-4-0-0; Hina, Charles W., 8-7-2-1; 
Hina, Henry B., 1-1-0-0; Hofstetter, Joe, 3-2-0-0; HoUand, 
David W., 7-1-2-0; HoUingsworth, Ralph D., 4-7-0-0; Holman, 
Joseph B.,4-3-l-l;Holman, Bitsy, S. T., 1-10-1-1 ; Holthouser, 
Terry W., 2-4-1-2; Holton, Glenn, 1-0-0-0; Hornsby, Cohn, 0- 
6-1-0; Horsman, Bill, 1-7-2-1; Howard, Jasper, 2-4-1-2; Ho- 
ward, Robert E., 3-8-1-0; Huber, Carl, 3-7-2-2; Huffme, Gary 
L., 0-1-0-0; Hunter, James E., 4-12-0-0; Hurley, Ken, 3-3-0-0; 
Hurley, Robert, 2-4-1-1; 

Idol, Billy Joe, 2-9-0-0; Ingram, William R., 0-5-0-1; Isaacs, 
Marvin D., 0-2-0-0; 

Jacoby, Ben, 6-4-0-0; James, Gene, 2-2-0-0; Jarrell, Frank, 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY 1970 



1-0-0-0; Johns, Charles, 3-1-1-1; Johnson, Gordon M., 0-1 1-2- 
0; Johnson, Harry, 3-6-0-0; Johnson, Robert F., 0-1-0-0; 
Johnson, Stan W., 4-3-1-0; Jones, George W., 0-0-0-1; Jones, 
J. Carl, 5-7-6-1; Jones, William L., 8-6-0-1; Jump, Frank E., 
2-5-1-1; 

Kan, Don. 4-3-5-2; Kathman, Bernie, 1-0-0-0; Kaufman. 
Alvin, 6-13-3-0; Kemper, Russ, 3-1-0-0; Kennedy, James R., 
1-1-0-0; Kerr, Kenneth, 2-6-1-0; Kimble, Frank, 0-5-0-0; King, 
Allen, 5-4-0-0; Kirk, Charles, 2-5-4-0; Kiser, Larry L., 0-1-0-0; 
Kraft, H.Nellis, 3-6-2-1; Kratzenberg, Ralph, 1-0-0-1; Kratzen- 
berg, Richard R., 1-0-0-1; Kratzenberg, Robert R., 1-0-0-1; 
Kuhl, Lawrence, 8-13-4-2; 

Lally, James, 1-0-0-1; Lambert, Irvin, 2-12-2-1 ; Landers, 
John F., 4-5-0-1; Lange, William E., 6-13-4-1; Law, William 
J., 4-10-0-0; Lawson, Leland, 4-0-0-0; Leahy, Pat, 2-6-3-2; 
Lee, Charles J., 1-0-0-0; Lee, Douglas, 0-1-2-0; Lee, William 
A., 0-3-1-0; Lefevers, Colman H.. 3-3-0-1; Lehkamp, Kenneth, 
2-4-1-1; Leightenheimer, David, 0-1-0-0; Lenahan, Thomas F., 
3-11-1-3; LeQuire, Harold, 0-1-2-0; Levy, Arthur. l-3-l-L_ 
Lewis, Jesse, 1-0-0-0; Lillie, William Westly, 1-4-0-0; Lindon, 
Bob, 6-7-0-3; Lingo, Henry E., 10-8-1-1; Linkes, Clifford, 0-1- 
4-2; Lloyd, Birt Leonard, 1-2-0-0; Logan, Doug, 0-2-0-1; Log- 
an, Eli, 4-7-1-2; Long, James E., 1-4-1-0; Lotz, Robert W., 
2-10-1-1; Lovall, Tommy, 1-0-0-0; Lowe, Gene T., 9-10-4-2; 
Lowe, Stan, 4-10-0-1; Lusby, George, 6-9-1-0; Lykins, James 
O., 0-3-1-0; 

McCormick, Donald, 8-1 1-2-0; McCoy, Larry, 1-6-2-1; Mc- 
Fadden, Jimmie, 3-4-1-2; McGehee, Gordon, 14-4-0-0; Mc- 
Ginty, L. V., 1-6-0-0; McKenzie, Robert L., 1-2-0-0; McLane 
Albert, 4-9-1-0; McLemore, Jack T., 3-14-3-0; McNamee, Jack, 
2-0-0-0; McPeek, Talmadge, 4-1-0-0; 

Magruder, Earl, 4-14-1-0; Major, Lucian, 1-1-1-0; Malcolm, 
Donald, 0-1-0-0; Malone, James F., 1-8-0-0; Maloney, Ross 
"Pat." 0-1-0-0; Marcum, Bruce, 1-0-0-0; Martin, Thomas F., 
1-10-2-1; Mattingly, Charles "Pete," 4-5-1-0; Mattingly, 
Wayne, 1-2-0-0; May, E. B., Jr., 2-7-1-0; May, Larry, 0-1-0-0; 
Mayhew, William M., 4-10-1-0; Melmige, James, 4-3-0-0; Mer- 
cke, Frank, 5-8-7-1; Mercker, George, 12-7-0-0; Mestepey, 
James, 2-4-1-1; Metcalf, Ken, 10-10-2-1; Metzger, Don, 5-7-0- 
0; Minta, John, 2-6-2-4; Moody, William R., 3-4-1-1; Mooney- 
han, James H., 1-9-0-0; Moore, James A., 2-6-0-1; Moore, 
Larry, 0-1-0-0; Moore, Robert W., 2-9-1-0: Mordica, William 
A., 6-3-0-0; Morgan, Jimmie Lee, 0-1-0-0; Morgan, Richard, 
8-10-4-4; Morris, Gene L., 1-1-0-0; Morris, Jerry, 2-0-1-0; 
Morrissey.Rockne, 5-1-0-0; Morse, Richard K., 14-3-1-1; Mos- 
er, Tom, 2-1-1-0; Moss, Howard, 6-3-0-0; Murray, Thomas, 
10-4-1-2; 

Neal, Gene, 1 1-2-4- "; Newman, Bill, 1-1-0-0; Nickell. Carl 
Duane, 2-5-1-0; Nolan, Michael B., 0-1-1-0; Noland, Douglas, 
9-9-1-1; Nord, Bertrand. 7-5-4-3; Nord, Gilbert, 3-5-1-0; Nor- 
wood, Donald, 1-3-0-0; Norwood, Thomas R., 1-5-0-0; 

Omnam, Ben R., 5-10- z-0; Omer, Harow G., 7-5-6-1, O' 
Nan, Norman, 3-1-0-0; Orem, Dale L.. 7-6-4-0; Osborne, Ted 
G., 3-6-0- l;Osting, James E., 0-7-0-0; 

Pace, Donald W., 4-5-1-1; Pack, Keith, 0-2-0-0; Padgett, 
R. K., 4-2-4-2; Pardue, Israel L., 0-10-1-1; Parker, Bob L., 2- 
1 1-3-1; Parker, Francis V., 4-5-0-1; Parsley, Clyde E., 1 1-7-0- 
1; Pate, Lloyd W., 3-8-1-0; Patterson, William C, 0-1-1-0; 
Paulk, John R., 4-2-2-3; Paxton, Gary R., 4-2-2-0; Peeno, 
Harry, 5-1 1-5-0; Pegausch, William E., 3-4-3-0; Pelham, Pete, 
0-1-0-0; Perkins, Ronnie, 7-13^-1; Phipps, James M., 0-3-1-0; 
Pietrowski, Paul, 0-5-6-0; Pinson, Eugene, 1-4-3-5; Pittman, 
Spencer R., 3-1-4-2; Porco, Kenneth J., 8-6-1-3; Powell, Lo- 
gan, 5-5-0-1; Powers, Clark, 0-1-0-0; Powers, Elmer, 1-2-0-0; 
Pugb Roy D., 4-7-0-1; 

Ramey, Roy, 0-4-0-0; Ransford, Paul, 0-1-1-0; Rapp, Bill, 
2-2-0-0; Rapp, Lowell, 1-0-0-3; Raque, Ronald, 7-15-1-1; Ray, 
Bob, 7-14-5-0; Ray, Collis R., 1-5-0-0; Ray, Shirley G., 4-4-0- 
1; Read, Frederick, 1-1-0-0; Reddington, Jim T., 5-17-3-1; 
Reece, Fred, 5-5-0-0; Reece. Jerry T., 6-8-0-2; Reed, Gordon, 
10-1-0-0; Renfro, James H., 4-1-0-0; Rhodes, Cecil, 1-2-1-0; 



Riggins, Jason M., 2-3-0-0; Riggs, Charles D., 2-7-2-0; Ring, 
BUI, 6-4-2-4; Roberts, James, 1-6-1-1; Robinson, D. Blake, 0- 
10-2-1; Robinson, Don L., 3-1-0-0; Rodgers, H. Tom, 2-4-0-0; 
Roemele, Juett, 1-1-0-0; Rogers, Eldridge, 2-3-1-0; Rolph, 
Harold J., 0-1-0-0; Rouse, Donald, 0-1-0-0; Russell, Gary E„ 
6-1-0-1; Russell, Joe A., 3-2-0-0; Russman, Godfrey F., 6-12- 
0-0; 

Sammons, Terry L., 1-6-2-2; Sanders, Mel, 2-3-0-0; Sapp, 
Edward, 2-9-3-1; Saylors, Carlee, 4-4-0-2; Schmidt, Henry 0- 
3-0-0; Schmitt, Paul E., 6-5-1-0; Schuble, Charles E., 4-9-6-0; 
Scott, BUI, 4-3-1-1; Seavers, Joe, 3-8-2-0; Selvy, Curt, 6-9-3-1; 
Shanks, Thomas E., 1-10-5-2; Shaughnessy, Bernard, 0-1-0-0; 
Shaw. John H., 7-2-1-0; Shewmaker, Wayne. 7-7-0-2; Simms. 
Clarence E., 4-5-2-0; Sizemore, Aster, 1-10-0-4; Sligh, Jim, 
7-5-0-0; Sloan, WaUace, 4-5-5-3; Slone Earl D., 0-6-7-0; Small, 
David E., 0-1-0-0; Smith. Robert E., 0-4-0-1; Smith, William 
E., 1-1-0-0; Snyder, Bernard, 0-2-1-0; South, Stanley P., 0-4- 
3-1; Spath, William J., 3-13-2-1; Spaulding, Johnny R., 2-5-1- 
5; Spencer. Edward H., 1-1-0-0; Staley, Jeny, 1-1 1-2-0; Stark, 
Dennis W., 0-1-0-0; Starling, Edward, 0-3-0-0; Staten, Joseph, 
5-8-3-2; Stephens, HerberJ D., 1-2-0-0; Stephenson Harry S., 
6-4-0-0; Stevens, William D., 9-12-0-0; Strain,"Richard P., 6-4- 
3-0; Streible, Ronnie, 0-3-0-0; Strong, Arnett, 5-6-1-1; Stuart, 
Joe G., 0-4-0-1; Stumbo, Jack, 2-1-2-4; Sullivan, A. G., 3-7-1- 
0; Sullivan, Don Chris, 2-4-0-1; Swarts, Joseph, 1-1-0-0; Swin- 
ford, John, 9-6-0-1; 

Talbot, William G.. 6-10-1-1; Taylor, Dennis H., 3-2-0-1 
Taylor, James R., 1-6-2-0; Thomas, Raymond E., 2-2-0-0 
Thompson, Jack, 6-5-0-0; Thompson, Ralph N., 1-0-0-0 
Thompson, Tom D., 5-7-3-0; Timmering. George E., 2-10-1-0: 
Treas, Joe W., 4-2-1-1; Treibly, Charles E., 1-8-3-1; Trimer, 
Norman E., 0-8-0-1; 

Urlage, Richard, 5-4-0-1; 

VanZant, Jim, 3-2-0-0; Varner, Ray G., 6-5-2-0; Vermeil, 
Robert H., 3-0-0-0; Vinciguerra. Phihp. 2-0-0-0; Vissman, 
Charles, 3-10-0-0; 

WaddeU, Billie, 0-1-O0; Wagner, Jim, 3-11-2-1; Waide, 
Harry D., 5-6-5-2; Walker, Julian R., 3-8-4-0; Walker, Paul R., 
6-5-0-4; Waller, Bobbie, 5-8-0-0; Wanchic, Nicholas, 6-5-1-0; 
Ward, Tommy, 0-1-2-0; Warren, Buist Buzz, 8-7-1-0; Warren, 
Kenneth A., 5-7-0-0; Washaleski, Tom. 0-7-1-1; Washer, James 
P., 2-9-7-2; Washer, Robert Stanley. 8-5-3-1; Watts, Shirley R.. 
8-6-0-0; Weaver, Clyde 1., 1-3-1-1; Weaver, Ray, 4-8-0-0; Webb. 
Dudley, 4-4-2-0; Weber, Thomas C, 6-7-3-0; Webner, J. Ran- 
dall, 1-10-0-2; Welch, Robert J., 2-2-0-0; Wheeler. Mellington. 
1-0-0-0; Wickham. James R., 3-7-1-0; Wilbert, Donald A.. 1- 
1 1-1-1 ; WiUey, Harold L., 0-0-0-2; Williams. James H.. 0-6-1-6; 
Willis. Donald A.. 1-2-4-4; Wilson. John Pope, 1-5-0-0; Wilson, 
Louis O., 7-14-0-1; Wilson, Nellus R.. 0-2-0-1; Wise, Jack, 5-9- 
0-1; Wray, Robert, 6-9-3-0; Wright, James L., 1-11-2-0; Wul- 
feck, James, 0-2-0-0; 

Young. Jack, 0-1-2-0; 

Zimmer, Thomas. 7-9-1-2. 

Major Activity Of The 1970 
Football Rules Committee 

St. Charles. Illinois, January 8-^. I "570 

NOTE: This is a brief summary of the more important 
modifications to the football rules authorized by the National 
Alliance Rules Committee during its 1 970 meeting. 

QUESTIONNAIRES for the purpose of determining the 
acceptance of the committee's action in 1969, and for secur- 
ing an evaluation of proposed changes were mailed to coaches 
and officials, to state association offices, the National Junior 
College Athletic Association, and the National Association of 
Intercollegiate Athletics. Approximately 19,000 forms were 
distributed and nearly 9,500 were returned and tabulated. 
The complete minutes contain a summary of the vote on each 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY 1970 



Page Nine 



of the listed items and a tabulation ot the significant com- 
ments which were requested on the back of the question- 
naire. The returns indicate a very high degree of satisfaction 
with the changes which had been made for the 1969 season. 
Permitting the use of a punt as a free-kick following a safety 
was favored by more than 96% of the respondents, while pro- 
viding that when a dead ball foul by one team is followed by 
a dead ball foul by the opponents the penalties are to be ad- 
ministered separately and in the order of occurance enjoyed 
acceptance by nearly 90%. The provision expanding the area 
in which blocking from the rear is legal, as well as that for 
awarding two points for the successful try by what would be 
a touchdown and one point for a field-goal or a safety re- 
ceived support by a margin of more than IV2 to 1. Removing 
the automatic acceptance or declination provision from the 
Code was favored by slightly less than IV2 to 1. The revision 
granting a player's request for a time-out for the purpose of a 
coach-official conference was favored by 8,131 as contrasted 
to 1,148 who opposed. A similar number, 8,066, favored 
specifying that a foul immediately preceding the snap or a 
free-kick causes the ball to remain dead, while 1,238 were 
opposed. Three changes were favored by approximately 4Vi 
to 1 and included providing the penalty for failure to pro- 
perly wear the required player equipment, designating it as 
unsportsmanlike conduct for a player to kick or throw the 
ball from the playing field following a touchdown, and de- 
fining participation by a replaced player or substitute as il- 
legal participation. 

ILLEGAL USE OF THE HANDS by the offensive team 
was the item most frequently mentioned as a major problem. 
Slightly less than 1/3 of all the respondents indicated it was a 
matter of concern. Goring and spearing, perennial problems, 
were mentioned by 2,462 respondents and this in spite of the 
fact that this was a point of special emphasis in 1969. In ad- 
dition to being checked in Part II of the Questionnaire, this 
item was mentioned in comments submitted by a number of 
coaches and officials. Tackling out-of-bounds was a major pro- 
blem in the opinion of 2,200 respondents. The next problem 
of major concern was that of blocking beyond the neutral 
zone during passes which cross the line of scrimmage and was 
reported by 1,416. The matter of intentionally incompleting 
a forward pass was reported by 1,064 men answering the 
questionnaire. This was another point of special emphasis in 
1969 and the subject of presentations during the annual Cen- 
tral States Rules Interpretation Clinic. The failure of player 
to property wear required equipment and gang tackling were 
two items which were mentioned by fewer than 1,000 res- 
pondents. The National Alliance Football Code contains am- 
ple provisions to eliminate these problem areas if the rules 
were properly applied. The fact that the respondents indicated 
these were problems is an indication the games have not been 
properly administered. It is the responsibility of those who 
supervise officials to provide adequate instruction, supervision, 
and evaluation which will insure the development of a greater 
degree of competency in officials. 
COMMITTEE REPORTS: 

During each year, and particularly during football season, 
the National Federation office receives a number of suggest- 
ions for improving or revising the National Alliance Code. 
Each proposal, along with recommendations from voting del- 
egates and advisory members, and the items from Parts II and 
III of the National Alliance Football Questionnaire are cat- 
egorized and assigned to one of five standing subcommittees 
for consideration. Before any matter of rules revision may be 
brought before the National Alliance Football Rules Commit- 
tee, it must have been presented in one of the subcommittee 
meetings and approved for presentation to the committee of 
the whole or be included as an item on the questionnaire. 
Preceding the opening session of the Football Rules Commit- 
tee Meeting, each subcommittee met to consider items on its 
agenda. The subcommittee meetings were sc' sduled so that 
subcommittee members were privileged to attend two different 
sessions. During the first general session, reports from the 
standing committees were presented to the committee of the 
whole and provided a wealth of material upon which to base 



consideration during the voting session. During the same ses- 
sion, the editor reviewed the questionnaire items and the 
comments as submitted. Each voting delegate was reminded 
to submit any other items and/or minority reports to the 
chairman if they were to be considered with out unanimous 
consent. A complete copy of each of the reports from the 
EQUIPMENT, INJURY DATA, GAME ADMINISTRATION, 
RESEARCH AND STATISTICAL, AND SAFETY SUBCOM- 
MITTEES are included in the complete minutes. 

1-1: The use of four officials, a referee, umpire, linesman, 
and field judge, is recommended. A greater or lesser number 
is permitted. 

1-3-3: It is recommended the line-to-gain equipment be 
operated on the side opposite the press box throughout the 
game, if there is a press box. When there is none, the location 
of the line-to-gain equipment will be specified by the game 
management at the request of the linesman. 

2-3: A catch is securing possession of a loose ball (back- 
ward pass, forward pass, fumble, or kick) in flight by a player 
who is inbounds and after such player secures possession 
while in the air, his first contact with the ground must be 
inbounds. 

3-5-3: The coverage will be revised to provide that an of- 
ficials' time-out may follow a charged time-out for a coach- 
official conference or when a safety factor is involved. 

3-7-2: Replaced players will be required to leave the field 
on the side of their team box. 

4-2-2a: Provides that the ball continues to be alive when 
the place-kick holder catches the snap with one knee down 
and rises to run or pass. 

4-3-3: When a runner goes out-of-bounds, the inbounds 
spot is fixed by the yardline through the foremost point of 
the ball at the time the runner crossed ihe plane of the side 
line. 

6-4-4: After a valid fair catch signal, no member of the 
receiving team may advance the ball. 

7-5-7: The revision eliminates counting the down as part 
of the penalty for an ineligible being illegally do\, nfie'd dur- 
ing a pass which crosses the line, The penalty fo. this foul is 
15 yards. 

9-3i: Intentionally kicking or throwing the ball from the 
playing field following a score will result in a penalty of 15 
yards. 

9-4-1: A player who inadvertently contacts a goal post 
placed on the endline, and do s not otherwise go out-of- 
bounds may continue to particif ite without penalty. 

9-6-3: The penalty for a nor-player being outside his team 
box, or walking along a boundary line, or through the field 
is 5 yards, unless repeated or designed to confuse opponents 
in which case it is 15 yards. 

10-2-2: If each team fouls during a down in which there is 
a change of team possession, the team last gaining possession 
may retain the ball provided its foul was not prior to the 
change of possession and provided it declines the penalty for 
its opponent foul. 

SIGNALS: 

The committee deleted signal No. 11, which has formerly 
been used to indicate intentional grounding. Since intentional 
ounding is a form of an illegal pass, signal No. 12 identifies 
tile foul. Action of the 1970 committee will require one new 
signal to be added. It will indicate first touching of a kick. 
The official will toss his cap to the spot of the first touching. 
The use of this signal will be advantageous because it would 
also designate the alternate spot from which the ball may be 
put in play. 
CASE BOOK SITUATIONS: 

Interpretations for several listed situations were requested 
and authorized. These will be included in the 1970 edition of 
the case book. A statement to be included in the foreward of 
the case book is to indicate that all rulings included in that 
publication are official interpretations and supplement the 
rules book. Since the case book is a supplement to the rules 
book, the information contained therein is officially adopted 
by the committee. 

1. SIMULTANEOUS CATCH: A Dlay will be added to ex- 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY 1970 



plain the different aspects of simultaneous possession of a 
forward pass near a boundary line. New situations to em- 
phasize the rules revisions will be included in this section. 

2. BACKWARD PASS OUT-OF-BOUNDS: A play situa- 
tion illustrating that when a backward pass is intentionally 
thrown out-of-bounds for the purpose of stopping the clock, 
the referee will be authorized to start the clock with the ready- 
for-play in accordance with 3-6-3. 

3. NUMBER OF OFFICIALS: A play situation will be 
developed to authorize the use of different numbers of of- 
ficials for administering the game. The recommendation will 
be that four is ideal but fewer or more are legal. 

POINTS OF SPECIAL EMPHASIS: 

Each year the National Alliance Rules Committee spec- 
ifies certain areas which are to be given special attention by 
all those responsible for teaching football rules. The 1970 
committee was no exception. One item has been specifically 
designated to be placed in this category for this year. TEAM 
BOXES are to be properly marked according to the rule and 
the officials' attention is to be directed to the requirement 
that team members must remain in the areas so marked. 
GENERAL: 

Editorial changes in the rules book, case book, officials 
manual and the rules-simplified and illustrated to correlate 
rules and sections were authorized by vote. The Editorial 
Committee was directed to revise the present language in or- 
der to increase understanding without changing the intent of 
the rules sections wherever feasible. 



Disqualifying Conditions 



The first step in screening a youth for participation in 
sports is a health examination, but this pre-season medical 
examination is only the beginning. Health supervision of the 
athlete should be continuous throughout the season, with a 
physician present for contests in contact sports and readily 
available during practice sessions. If an athlete is out of play 
with an injury for any length of time, he should be checked 
by a physician before returning to practice. Advising the play- 
ers on conditioning, nutrition, and other health practices is 
also part of the medical supervision today. 

Putting together the findings of his examination and the 
facts of the health history, the physician makes his appraisal 
of a prospective player's fitness to participate. In a great ma- 
jority of cases, medical approval will be forthcoming; in a few 
instances the physician will decide he has to say "no'" ... a 
most unpleasant decision to make. 

Coaches and parents can be the key to successful guidance 
in this situation. If they continue to press for the boy to play, 
they will only add to his disappointment in the end. The ver- 
dict of the physician in such cases is not arrived at lightly and 
it is unlikely that it will be reversed. In addition, when 
the physician does disqualify a youth for one sport, he tries 
to guide him into another that holds less hazard for him. 

The AMS Committee on the Medical Aspects ot Sports 
has stated: "After all, football is a game, and no game is as 
important as the health or life of a yoi.*i whose condition 
should prohibit play." The same can be said of other sports, 
each of which has its own physical demands based on the na- 
ture of the activity. 

Though incomplete, the conditions cited below illustrati 
the kind of problems with which the doctor must be con- 
cerned in evaluating a prospective player: 

Absent organs such as a kidney or an eye which leaves the 
remaining co-organ vulnerable is a reason for restriction from 
contact sports. 

Acute infections such as mononucleosis, hepatitis, rheu- 
matic fever, boils, and impetigo are sufficient reasons for dis- 



qualifications from ail forms ol athletics until recovery has 
occurred. 

Bleeding tendencies which might be triggered by athletic 
injuries are cause for disqualification from any sport in which 
there is a risk of injury. 

Convulsive disorders not completely controlled by med- 
ication are a cause for disqualification from sports in which 
an injury hazard exists. 

Diabetes that is poorly controlled is cause for exclusion 
from sports until such time as proper control has been ac- 
hieved. 

Emphysema and asthma are cause for disqualification in 
those sports involving endurance or prolonged exertion. 

Enlarged liver is a reason for restriction with respect to 
contact sports because trauma to the organ could have serious 
consequences. 

Enlarged spleen is a cause for disqualification from contact 
sports because injury can aggravate the condition or even 
rupture the organ. 

Heart diseas of sufficient severity to restrict activity is 
definitely a cause for disqualification from strenuous sports. 

Hernia in any location is a reason for restriction from all 
but the mildest forms of sport until the condition is repaired. 

Hypertension, or elevated blood pressure, with defects in 
structure or function of the circulatory system, is a reason 
for exclusion from vigorous sports. 

Physical immaturity measured against other comptitiors 
should bar a boy from contact sports such as football, for his 
own protection. 

Previous injury, such as repeated concussions, is a cause 
for disqualification from contact sports. 

Previous surgery on the head or spine is a reason for re- 
striction from contact sports and from others where the risks 
of injury are great. 

Renal disease with defects in kidney structure or function 
is a reason for restriction from sports. 

Severe myopia is a cause for disqualification from contact 
sports as a protection to both the individual and other par- 
ticipants. 

Structural abnormalities of the muscular or skeletal system 
are cause for restriction from sports in which they would be 
aggravated by the activity or subject the player to unusual 
risk. 

Tuberculosis, active or under treatment, is a disqualifying 
condition with respect to all sports. 

Fortunately, the list of sports and games is extremely 
long and the range in physical demands runs from very mild 
to very strenuous.. With the help of his physician and his 
coach every youth should be able to find some sport that he 
can play with safety and satisfaction. 

National Federation and A.M.A. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled February 1) 
If the telephone number is given for an official, it is the 
home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two num- 
bers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 



Conley, Bobby J., 801 Russ Street, Portsmouth, Ohio, 776- 

ftilS. 354-1200 
Grooms, Roger, 7635 Forest Road, Cincinnati, Ohio, 232- 

0024 y 232,2772 
Herbold, Steven C, 75 5 Kings Run, Cincinnati, Ohio, 542- 

5404, 242-2900 
Porter, Clarence, 3855 Grace Street, New Boston, Ohio, 456- 

5015,456-4555 
Wright. Raleigh F., Broad Bottom, 432-3507 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY 1970 



Page Eleven 



Seating Chart of Freedom Hall 




CROWD CONTROL 
By Supt. Frank Dick, Toledo Public Schools 

The schools of our country are becoming increasingly a- 
ware of the need for preventive measures to overcome crowd 
control behavior problems. 

We in Toledo, because of our early concern, have taken 
a leadership position throughout the country in our attempt 
to control crowds at athletic contests. 

Good crowd control consists of much preventive planning 
and organization long before problems arise. While most in- 
terscholastic contests are conducted without unpleasant in- 
cidents, it is necessary to organize all contests far in advance 
and to use every possible avenue in pre-planning. 

It's a job, "a responsibility", that has got to be shared by 
the board of education, our police, our courts, our civic groups 
and by every respectable citizen. However, our school officials 
who are on the firing line, have the biggest share of the re- 
sponsibility. 

The responsibility for much of the student body's attitude 
lies with the high school principals while the athletic director 
should be well schooled in the principles of crowd control. 
The coach must realize that in time of crisis, the coach is de- 
finitely coaching more than his team. He has a responsibility 
not only to his athletes, but to the student body, to his ad- 
ministration and to the entire community in which he lives. 

Toledo lost night football in 1963, suddenly and drasti- 
cally, following a fight in which 31 boys were arrested. 

The high school athletic program started to deteriorate be- 
cause of lack of interest, expecially in football and the lack of 
finances to sponsor a good overall program. 

Three years ago we started experimenting with twHight 
tooioau games. They have proven very successful. Night bas- 
ketball games are still being scheduled, however, because of 
the preventive measures and the firm, positive stand taken by 
school authorities. 

In an era when it is popular to break down the establish- 
ment, we must protect our high school activities. This danger 



is a real thing, and it is a national disgrace that \ i have these 
incidents happening throughout our country. High ;chool foot- 
ball especially has had its share of riots - both by day and by 
night. The problem, however, is not one which belongs ex- 
clusively to sports. Disturbances are a national "ommunity 
problem. However, from my experience in Toledo, I can say 
to you that sports are a major arm to counteract these dis- 
turbances and a national medi m to coordinate community 
involvement, thereby bringing the community together to 
solve a common problem. 

A plan for maintaining control of spectators was carefully 
worked out by the commissioner of athletics, after consulta- 
tion with myself, the safety director, chief of police, school 
booster clubs and school authorities. 

In September at the regular monthly meeting of our high 
school principals association, there was great concern pertain- 
ing to the loitering of out-of-school youth on the way to and 
from school and on the campus proper. Shortly thereaiier, 
we had a disturbance after one ot our football games which, 
although was not major, it still represented a situation that 
had to be controlled. We used this incident to call an emer- 
gency meeting of the principals association, at which time we 
invited the police department. We then had a third meeting 
to which we invited the principals, police department and 
city nf( ~Kn) c along, with the court o fficia ls 

I then presented a proposal for a new ordinance to tne 
city council to handle loitering around school buildings and 
stadiums, and to cover any harrassment of our school child- 
ren either to or from school, or on the school grounds, streets, 
and/or sidewalks facing the school area. The city law depart- 
ment prepared a proposed law which would provide a fine of 
up to $1,000.00, a year in jail, or both, upon conviction of 
assaulting, harrassing, or using obscene language to school per- 
sonnel while on school property, or to and from school, sta- 
diums, or gymnasiums. 

This ordinance, under Section 1 of the Toledo Municipal 
Code, was an entirely new ordinance as we had research out 
that all existing ordinances had loopholes in them. 

This ordinance was passed and the city juvenile judges 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY 1970 



In Stock for 
Immediate Delivery 

First-aid Supplies 



The Sport Shop 



Phone 502 651-5143 



A.B.A. Cold Tablets 

Adhesive Tape 

Alcohol 

Am Caps 

Analgestic Liniment 

Ankle Brace 

Ankle Weights 

Ankle Wraps 

Aspirin 

Athletic Liniment 

Athletic Soap 

Ath-O-Gesic 

Atomic Balm 

Atomic Rub-Down 

Band Aid 

Batter's Rosin 

Bike Tape 

Black Magic 

Body Powder 

Butterfly Tablets 

Carbonate Stick 

Cotton 

Cotton Applicators 

Cramergesic 

Dextrotabs 

Dial-A-Tab 



Dry Smelling Salt 

Elastic Wraps 

Elbow Pads 

Felt 

Firm Grip 

First Aid Kits 

Foam Rubber 

Foot Ointment 

Foot Powder 

Foot Solution 

Fung-o-spray 

Gauze 

Glare Guard 

Instant Ice 

Iso-Quin 

J & J Cream 

J & J Tape 

KJeen Ball 

Knee Braces 

Knee Pads 

Tape 

Tape Remover 

Tongue Depressors 

Towels 

Training Kits 

Tuf-Skin 

Vitamins 




1 06- 1 1 North Race Street 
Glasgow, Kentucky 42141 

Write for I 969-70 school catalogue 



have really "cracked down" on juvenile offenders. This word 
gets around quickly to potential delinquents. Since the first 
incident in September, we have not had an incident reported 
at a football or basketball game this year. 

We give all our school officials guidelines to follow in a 
brochure entitled, "Crowd Control Procedures". This includes 
definite assignments given to the principal, the athletic direc- 
tors, the coaches, the team, the cheerleaders, and the game 
officials. We then hold these people responsible to fulfull 
these guidelines. 

Public education must face up to its responsibilities in the 
area of crowd control. Educatior c must establish desirable 
standards for spectator behavior and then encourage the adopt- 
ion of these standards by their students and the community 
at large. 

SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED WRESTLING OFFICIALS 

Cox, William B., 1 600 Ashwood Drive, Lexington, 266-4466 
Givens, C. Michael, 704 Woodland Avenue, Lexington, 258- 

9000, Ext. 77271 
Konvalinka, John P., 215 Mills Drive, Clarksville, Tenn., 648- 

2695 
Scholtz, Randolph F., Box 560, Centre College, Danville, 

236-6178 
Terry, Bob, 128 Blue Ridge Road, Anchorage, 245-0006, 

vts-4im 

BASKETBALL QUESTIONS 

(Continued from Page One) 

disregarded. If the try is not successful, Al is awarded a sub- 
stitute throw for the violation by Bl. 

31. Play: Does Rule 2-10 provide for the delayed calling 
of infractions? 



Ruling: No. Rule 2-10 makes provision for only either the 
correction of an error in the application of a penalty for a 
called infraction (foul or violation) or (e) for erroneously 
counting or cancelling a score. Rule 2-10 does not affect nor 
modify the time at which infractions (either fouls or viola- 
tions) shall be called by the officials. The five provisions of 
2-10 only authorize correction when there has been an error 
in the administration of a penalty or recording a score. 

For Example: A substitute wearing number "2" reports 
to the scorer and is beckoned onto the court by an official, 
After the ball has become alive and then been declared dead, 
it is discovered that the recently admitted player is wearing an 
illegal number (2). May the official penalize for the illegal 
number if he does so before the ball becomes alive for the 
second time? 

Ruling: No, in order that the penalty be assessed it must 
be done before the clock starts. However, if the player leaves 
the game and subsequently reenters, he is then subject to a 
technical foul if the infraction is discovered before the clock 
starts. 

32. Play: Al is making a throw-in and touches the sideline 
boundary with his foot but it does not break the plane be- 
tween the court and the inside edge of the 2-inch line bound- 

™ Comment: The rules application in this situation is the 
same for the 2-inch boundary as it is for the 8-inch boundary 
or a 3-foot belt. Care is taken here to point out that the re- 
ference is to a throw-in, that is, with the action from outside 
the court to inside the court. The same principle applies to 
'jringing the ball from back court to the front court. It might 
be well to note in relating to similar situations that the free 
thrower may not touch the line with his toe during a free 
throw because the plane is the free throw line edge the fur- 
thest from the backboard. Similarly, the players who line up 
on the free throw lane may not break the plane on the out- 
side edge of the lane boundary. To do so is a violation. The 
court diagram, as included in the rules provides support for 
these interpretations. 



IF YOU ARE NOT USING OUR STUDENT COVERAGE 
NOW, A FEW MINUTES SPENT IN COMPLETING AND 
COMPARING THE CHART BELOW WILL SHOW 
WHETHER YOU SHOULD CONSIDER OUR POLICY 
FOR THE COMING YEAR. 



PRESENT OUR 
POLICY POLICY 



1. Accident Medical Expense Benefit — Maximum 

2. Linvt for calls at doctor's office? 

3. Limit for X-rays or negative X-rays? 

4. Limit for Dental Expense, per tooth? 

5. Scheduled Surgery Benefits? 

6. Private Tutoring Benefit? 

7. Benefits payable regardless of other insurance? 

8. Coverage available on 24-hour basis? 

9. Available to employees? 

10. Does policy cover Athletics, except Football? 

11. Is Football Coverage available? 

12. Is policy approved by KHSAA? 

13. Is Claim Service prompt and is an interest she m 
in your special problems? 



$8,000 

NO 

NO 

NO 

NO 

YES 

YES 

YES 

YES 

VES 

YES 

YES 

YES 



NOTE: Items 2 through 5 provide for payment of reasonable 
and customary charges for services rendered. 

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KNOW MORE ABOUT THESE 
COVERAGES, WE WILL BE HAPPY TO CALL ON YOU. 
JUST LET US KNOW. 



*7Ue KitUfdcH Company 



GENERAL AGENT 



W. E. KINGSLEY 



121-123 LAFAYETTE AVENUE 
P. O. BOX 71fl0 



J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. 
Life Department 

LEXINGTON, KY. 40502 



CHARLES C. PRICE 
PHONE 254-40S6 



K.H.S.A.A. TOURNAMENT DIRECTORS 

District and Regional Tournament Directors can get all of their supplies 
and needs to run a tournament from Hunt's. We have the merchandise 
listed below in stock for immediate shipment. Call or write us your needs. 

BASKETBALLS 

Get the feel of a basketball same as will be used in the State Tournament in 
Louisville, and in your District or Regional Tournament. We have all 
brands. 

ADMISSION TICKETS 

Complete stock of admission tickets, 2,000 tickets to the roll numbered con- 
secutively. Printed ADULT, STUDENT, and ADMIT ONE. $1.50 per roll 
of 2,000. 

TROPHIES AND AWARDS 

We can take care of your Sportsmanship trophies, individual charms for 
All-Star teams, etc. Our stock is complete and we can engrave in our store 
and ship to you at once. 

ACCESSORIES 

Nets, scorebooks, first-aid supplies, whistles, stopwatches, timers' horns, 
powdered rosin, bath towels, shoe laces, colored top sweat socks, carry-all 
bags. All of this merchandise in stock for at once delivery. 

BANKS AND GOALS 

We have a complete stock of fan-shaped steel, fan-shaped and rectangular 
glass backboards complete with goals and nets in stock for at once delivery. 
A phone call will get them off to you at once. 



FAIR-PLAY ELECTRIC BASKETBALL SCOREBOARDS 

We have B>J STOCK the Fair Play Tick-A-Way Scoreboard ready for imme- 
diate shipment. A call will get one to your gymnasium before tournament 
time. 

Turn all of your needs over to us. We will be glad to handle them for you. 
ROY BOYD, JIM MITCHELL, DICK STONE, EDDIE THOMIS, or C. A. 
BYRN, JR. are always ready to assist you in every way possible. 
If you want the BEST QUALITY and the BEST SERVICE contact HUNT'S 

HUNTS ATHLETIC GOODS CO., INC. 

CH 7-1941 — PHONES — CH 7-1942 

MAYFIELD. KENTUCKY 
PHONE 459-6366 LOUISVILLE, KY. 



I We Ship-The Da^You BuV^ 




00^000000*00 * t00 m 





High School Athlete 



THE WOODFORD COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL 
1970 CHAMPIONSHIP WRESTLING TEAM 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Steve Hillock, Bill Mullins, Bill Barrows, Norman Davis, 
Don Butler. Second Row: Coach Wayne Hansen, Joe Short, Hartley Wilson, Eddie Davis, 
Larry Weathers, Frank Gains, Rick LeMaster, Jerry Fitch, Mgr. Tom Sturgeon. 



Official Organ of the 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 



MARCH 1970 



Modern Ides of March 



The gym lights gleam like a beacon beam 
And a million motors hum 

In a good will flight on a Friday night; 
For basketball beckons, "Come!" 



A sharp-shooting mite is king tonight. 

The Madness of March is running. 
The winged feet fly, the ball sails high 

And field goal hunters are gunning. 



The colors clash as silk suits flash 

And race on a shimmering floor. 

Repressions die, and partisans vie 
In a goal acclaiming roar. 



On Championship Trail toward a holy grail, 
All fans are birds of a feather. 

It's fiesta night and cares lie light 
When the air is full of leather. 



Since time began, the instincts of man 
Prove cave and current men kin. 

On tournament night the sage and the wight 
Are relatives under the skin. 



It's festival time, — sans reason or rhyme 
But with nationwide appeal. 

In a world of hate, our ship of state 
Rides high on an even keel. 



With war nerves tense, the final defense 
Is the courage, strength and will 

In a million lives where freedom thrives 
And liberty lingers still. 



Let commies clash and empires crash 
'Neath the wreck of a victory arch ! 

Let our boys tread where hate is dead, — 
In this happy Madness of March! 

— H. V. Porter. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXXII-NO. 8 



MARCH, 1970 



$1.00 Per Year 



Thinkers And Doers 

By Rear Admiral James F. Calvert, Superintendent, 
United States Naval Academy 

1969 National Federation Annual Meeting 

Thank you very much, Mi. Allen, I appreciate those very 
kind words. I often think in introductions like that how much 
I wish my mother and father were still living so they could 
hear them. My mother would have been pleased and even my 
father might have believed some of the things that were said, 
I don't know. 

To put myself in a little bit. better perspective for you 
though, I thought that I might share with you an experience 
I had about three years ago over in England. I was a very new 
admiral in the Navy at the time. In fact, I had been an ad- 
miral only a week or so when I received the invitation to go 
over to Oxford to participate in a seminar over there. I as- 
sumed, of course, that this was because I was at the time, the 
youngest admiral in the Navy and it was some sort of special 
recognition. 

I hastened over to England, to Oxford, and when I ar- 
rived there was an invitation to a dinner being held at St. 
John's College at which I assumed that I would be asked to 
say a few words. So 1 went prepared, and when I got there, I 
found that I was not being asked to say a few words, in fact, 
I had difficulty finding a seat but I bore up under the dis- 
appointment and listened with patience to the after dinner 
speaker who I assume did not know I was there. But I thought 
that the story he told went a little too far and I'll share it 
with you to see how you feel about it. 

It concerned three gentlemen in a smoking car or parlor 
car waiting in the station, in Waterloo station, in London for 
it to go out into the country. As I think many of you know, 
the protocal and courtesy in a smoking car in England among 
the gentlemen is much more formal than it is in our country. 
You don't lean across the aisle and say "Hey Charlie, can I 
borrow the sports pages." You wait until the oldest man 
speaks and if he doesn't choose to speak no one ever does 
speak. On this particular day, there were only three gentle- 
men in the car and the eldest gentleman didn't choose to say 
anything until the tioin had rolled out of the station and was 
on its way some 15 or 20 minutes when he fianlly lowered 
his newspaper and took his pipe from his mouth and was 
looking over the top of his glasses and said that his name was 
Brook Poppin. He was a retired admiral, married, two sons, 
both doctors, both doing well. Nobody said anything for a- 
nother 15 or 20 minutes, but after this reasonable pause in 
the conversation, the second man felt that he might speak up 
and he lowered his paper and said his name was Smith Brown- 
ing, he too was a retired admiral, married, two sons, both 
barristers, both doing well. After these two rather self- 
satisfied statements, the third man who was much younger 
was somewhat on the spot but he waited his 20 minutes, fin- 
ally lowered his paper and said his name was O'Hollahan. He 
was a retired bookmaker, he had never married, had two 
sons, both admirals, both doing well. So after dinner, I went 
up and introduced myself to the speaker. He said that was the 
Royal Navy he was talking about, not the American Navy. 

But more seriously, I am very delighted to have a chance 
to be here this morning to talk with you representatives of 
the National Federation about two or three things that con- 



cern me, to tell you a little bit about the Naval Academy ana 
perhaps give you some insight into two or three things that 
concern all of us, perhaps to enable you to see them in a 
slightly different way, I don't know. 

I suppose that if there is one subject that concerns all of 
us in the back of our minds, whether we are in public educa- 
tion, private education or simply American Citizens, it is that 
there is clearly something very wrong in the United States 
these days. I don't think it any longer possible for us to say, 
"Oh well, troubles come and go and there is always something 
going on." There is indeed something going on in America to- 
day and I think it's as serious as anything since the Civil War. 
I don't think for a hundred years, the fabric of our country 
has been so torn, the nature and spirit of America so dis- 
turbed. 

In Washington recently, within the past few weeks, there 
has been a serious campus disturbance in which the conduct of 
some of the young men was so far out of line with what can 
be accepted even in our permissive society, that a trial re- 
sulted and apparently without warning, or at least so far as 
outsiders could see without warning, the father of one of the 
young men appeared from another part of the country. The 
father was a distinguished lawyer of considerable reputation, 
certainly a fine appearance and in what to me was a most 
distressing confrontation in the courtroom, the boy told his 
father in obscene language, it wasn't just profanity that every- 
one could hear, that he wanted no part of his help or de- 
fense and he demanded that someone else represent him in 
the trial. 

In Boston recently, within the past three months, a col- 
lege dean tried to talk courteously and carefully to a group 
of students concerning a disturbance in the campus and he 
was interrupted, and I might add at 10 o'clock in the morn- 
ing by what in our day we would call a coed, with language 
that I, in my 30 years in the Navy, don't believe I have ever 
heard a sailor use. And some of these, at least in the old Navy, 
used to be pretty good. Where she learned those words, I 
don't know. I have never heard some of them before. But the 
language that young woman, and I think she forfeited the 
right to be called a young lady, used at the top of her voice 
at 10 o'clock in the morning in talking to a man who has to 
qualify as one of the more distinguished and respected deans 
in American education, ought to make all of us stop and 
think about what is happening inside the United States. 

In New York City this spring, a high school student, in 
front of a large group of people, tore down the American 
Flag from the wall, spit on it, and stamped on it and used 
language in reference to his Country that I think just 10 or 15 
years ago would have resulted in his being locked up. 

What has happened here? The stock answer given by the 
members of the campus generation and the high school gen- 
eration, who are involved in this sort of activity, is that the 
custodians of the society have failed- meaning you and me. 
It is our generation, those people now between 40 and 60, 
those who, within the framework of American society usually 
hold the positions of authority, that have failed. And it is our 
fault that high school boys tear down the American Flag and 
spit on it and stamp on it, and that a young college woman uses 
language in the public, in the earshot of hundreds of other 
people, to a dean of her college that, a few years ago, a dock 
worker would have been ashamed to use to other dock work- 
ers. 

This is our fault? We have failed as a generation? I would 
like to take a look at the record for just a moment of our 
generation, if I can speak of those of us now who are be- 
(Continued on Page Nine) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH 1970 



VOL. XXXII- NO. 8 



MARCH, 1970 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 40501 

Second class postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. b. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Ralph C. Dorsey (1966-70), Horse Cave 

Vice-President ... Foster J. Sanders ( 1966-70), Louisville 
Directors-MortonCombs(1968-72),Carr Creek; W. H. Crow 
dus (1968-71), Franklin; Don Davis (1967-71), Independ- 
ence; James T. Dotson (1968-72), Pikeville, Lee T. Mills 
(1969-73), Frankfort; Richard Vincent (1969-73). Morgan- 



field. 



Subscription Rate $1.00 per Yea 



-ftom the 6< 



ommissconei s 



Off 



ice 



REPORTS NOW DUE 

1. 1969-70 Basketball Participation List 

2. School's Report on Basketball Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Basketball) 



Spring Meets 

Tentative dates have been set for the various spring meets 
and tournaments in gymnastics, rifle marksmanship, baseball, 
track, golf and tennis. They are as follows: 

March 28, State Gymnastics Meet 

April 25, State Rifle Championship 

May 4-7, district baseball tournaments (Sites given below) 

May 8-9, regional track meets, Classes A and AA (sites 

were given in the February issue of the ATHLl'TE) 

May 11, regional golf tournaments (sites given below) 

May 15, regional track meets. Class AAA 

May 16, State Track meets. Classes A and AA 

May 19-20, Girls' Individual and Team State tournaments 

May 19-20, Boys' Team State Tournament 

May 22, State Track Meet, Class AAA 

May 22-23, regional baseball tournaments (sites given be- 
low) 

May 26-27, Boys' Individual State Tournament 

May 29-30, regional tennis tournament (sites given below) 

June 2-4, State Baseball Tournament 

June 5-6, State Tennis Tournament 

In assigning schools to districts and regions for spring 
meets, the principal source of information is the blue state- 
ment form filed by the school principal when he enrolls his 
school in the Association. If a coach is listed for a sport, it is 
assumed that the school sponsors a team in that sport. In 
some instances the coach of a particular sport may not have 
been assigned at the time the statement form was filed, and 
in other instances the principal may have decided that a sport 
for which a coach was named will not be sponsored by the 
school this year. 

Principals should study the assignment of schools by dis- 
tricts and regions which appears below to determine whether 
or not the listings for their schools are correct. The State 
Office should be notified only if the name of the school 
should be added to or omitted from any of the lists given. 

BASEBALL 

Paducah Region 

Christian County District - Christian County, Dawson 
Springs, Fort Campbell, Hopkinsville, Trigg County 

Murray District - Benton, Calloway County, Murray, 
North Marshal], South Marshall 

Paducah District - Ballard Memorial, Heath. Lone Oak, 
Paducah Tilghman, Reidland, St. Mary 

Mayfield District - Carlisle County, Cuba, Farmington, 
Fulton County, Hickman County, Mayfield 



Caldwell County District - Caldwell County, Crittenden 
County, Fredonia, Livingston Central, Lyon County 

Madisonville Region 

Henderson District - Henderson, Henderson County, Holy 
Name, Providence, Union County. Webster County 

Daviess County District - Daviess County, Livermore, 
Owensboro, Owensboro Catholic, Trinity, ( Whitesville) 

Madisonville District - Calhoun, Earlington, Madisonville- 
North Hopkins, Sacramento, South Hopkins, West Hopkins 

Hughes-Kirk District - Bremen, Centra] City, Drakesboro, 
Graham, Greenville. Hughes-Kirk, Muhlenberg Central 

Leitchfield District - Butler County, Caneyville, Clarkson, 
Edmonson County, Leitchfield 

Breckinridge County District - Breckinridge County, Fred- 
erick Fraize, Hancock County, Ohio County 

Greensburg Region 

Bowling Frcen District - BowlingGreen, Franklin-Simpson, 
University, Warrne Central, Warren East 

Auburn District - Adairville, Auburn. Chandlers Chapel, 
Lewisburg, Olmstead, Russellville, Todd Central 

Glasgow District - Austin Tracy, Allen County, Glasgow, 
Hiseville, Park City. Temple Hill, ScottsviUe 

Metcalfe County District - Clinton County, Cumberland 
County, Gamaliel. Metcalfe County, Tompkinsville 

Greensburg District - Caverna, Greensburg, Hart County, 
LaRue County 

North Hardin District - East Hardin, Elizabethtown, Fort 
Knox, Meade County. North Hardin, West Hardin 

CampbellsvilJe District - Adair County, Campbellsville, 
Lebanon, St. Augustine, St. Charles, Taylor County 

Bardstown District - Bardstown, Mt. Washington, Nelson 
County, Washington County 

Jefferson County Region 

Pleasure Ridge Park District - Bishop David, Butler, Plea- 
sure Ridge Park, Western 

Shawnee District - Central, Flaget, Shawnee 

Fairdale District - Doss, Fairdafc, Jesse Stuart, Valley 

DeSales District - DeSales, Iroquois, Southern, Thomas 
Jefferson 

duPont Manual District - Alrrens, duPont Manual. Louis- 
ville Male, St. Xavier 

Trinity District - Atherton, Louisville Country Day, Sen- 
eca, Trinity 

Fern Creek District - Durrett, Fern Creek, Jeffersontown, 
Marion C. Moore 

Westport District - Ballard, Eastern, Kentucky Military 
Institute, Waggener, Westport 

Newport Region 

Boone County District - Boone County, Dixie Heights, 
Lloyd Memorial. St. Henry, Simon Kenton 

Holy Cross District - Beechwood, Covington Catholic, 
Holmes, Holy Cross, Ludlow 

Silver Grove District - Bishop Brossart, Campbell County, 
Highlands, St. Thomas, Silver Grove 

Eminence District - Carroll County, Eminence, Gallatin 
County, Henry County, Owen County. Trimble County 

Grant County District - Grant County, Pendleton, Walton- 
Verona, Williamstown 

Newport District - Bellevue, Dayton, Newport, Newport 
Catholic 

MasonCounty District - Bracken County, Fleming County, 
Lewis County, Mason County, Maysville, Tollesboro 

Lexington Region 

Shelbyville District - Oldham County, Shelby County, 
ShelbyvilJe, Taylorsville 

Frankfort District - Frankfort, Franklin County, George- 
town, Scott County 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH 1970 



Page Three 



Woodford County District - Anderson, Harrodsburg, Mer- 
cer County, Western, Woodford County 

Harrison County District - Bourbon County, Harrison 
County, Millersburg Military Institute, Nicholas County, Paris 

Lexington District - Bryan Station, Henry Clay, Lafayette, 
Lexington Catholic, Sayre, Tates Creek 

Boyle County District - Boyle County, Danville, Garrard 
County, Jessamine County, Kentucky School for the Deaf 

Richmond District - ISerea Community, Estill County, 
Irvine, Madison, Madison Central, Model 

Casey County District - Casey County, Hustonville, Mt. 
Vernon, McKinney, Stanford 

Somerset Region 

Somerset District - Burnside, Eubank, Pulaski County, 
Somerset 

Russell County District - McCreary County, Monticello, 
Pine Knot, Russell County, Wayne County 

Clay County District - Clay County, Hazel Green Aca- 
demy, Lee County, Oneida Institute, Oakdale Christian, 
Powell County 

Hazel Green District - Bush, Hazel Green, Lily, London 

Harlan District - Cumberland, Evarts, Harlan, James A. 
Cawood, Lynch 

Middlesboro District - Barbourville, Bell County, Corbin, 
Lone Jack, Middlesboro 

Hindman District - Can Creek, Fleming-Neon, Hindman, 
Jenkins, Knott County, Letcher, Riverside Christian, Whites- 
burg 

Leslie County District - Combs Memorial, Hazard, Leslie 
County, M. C. Napier, Leatherwood 

Morehead Region 

Elkhorn City District - Belfry, Elkhorn City, Feds Creek, 
Johns Creek, Phelps 

Pikeville District - Dorton, Millard, Mullins, Pikeville, Vir- 
gie 

McDowell District - Martin, McDowell, Prestonsburg, Way- 
land, Wheelwright 

Paintsville District - Ezel, Inez, Johnson Central, Morgan 
County, Paintsville 

Ashland District - Boyd County, Fairview, Holy Family, 
Louisa, Paul G. Blazer 

McKell District - McKell, Raceland, Russell 

Morehead District - Breckinridge University, Hitchins, 
Olive Hill, Prichard, Rowan County 

Montgomery County District - Bath County, George Ro- 
gers Clark, Menifee County, Montgomery County, Mt. Sterling 



GOLF FOR GIRLS 

Caldwell County Region - Greenville, Henderson County, 
Murray, Owensboro, Union County 

Bowling Green Region - Bowling Green, Elizabethtown, 
Glasgow, Monticello, North Hardin, Scottsville 

Louisville Region - Atherton, Ballard, Eastern, Loretto, 
Oldham County, Sacred Heart, Shelbyville, Waggener, West- 
port 

Frankfort Region - Campbellsville, Carroll County, Dixie 
Heights, Frankfort, Franklin County, Highlands, Lafayette, 
Owen County. 

Winchester Region - Bryan Station, George Rogers Clark, 
Harlan, Harrison County, London, Middlesboro, Tates Creek 

Ashland Region - Fleming County, Mason County, Mays- 
ville, Paintsville, Paul G. Blazer, Prestonsburg, St. Patrick, 
University Breckinridge 



GOLF FOR BOYS 

Princeton Region - Caldwell County, Christian County, 
Crittenden County, Fort Campbell, Fulton, Heath, Hickman 
County, Hopkinsville, Mayfield, Murray, North Marshall, 
Paducah, St Mary 



Owensboro Region - Breckinridge County, Central City, 
Daviess County, Greenville, Henderson, Henderson County, 
Madisonville-North Hopkins, Meade County, Ohio County, 
Owensboro, Owensboro Catholic, Providence, Union County 

Park City Region - Allen County, Bowling Green, Camp- 
bellsville, Elizabethtown, Fort Knox, Glasgow, Greensburg, 
LaRue County, North Hardin, Russellville, Scottsville, Todd 
County, University 

West Jefferson Region - Ahrens, Bishop David, Butler, 
DeSales, Doss, Flaget, Iroquois, Marion C. Moore, Pleasure 
Ridge Park, Shawnee, Southern, Thomas Jefferson, Valley, 
Western 

East Jefferson Region - Atherton, Ballard, duPont Manual, 
Durrett, Eastern, Fern Creek, Jeffersontown, Kentucky Mili- 
tary Institute, Louisville Country Day, Louisville Male, St 
Xavier, Seneca, Trinity, Waggener, Westport 

Garrard County Region - Anderson, Bardstown, Boyle 
County, Casey County, Danville, Garrard County, Harrods- 
burg, Irvine, Jessamine County, Mercer County, Nelson Coun- 
ty, St. Augustine, St. Charles, Stanford, Washington County 

Frankfort Region - Bourbon County, Bryan Station, Emin- 
ence, Frankfort, Franklin County, George Rogers Clark, 
Georgetown, Good Shepherd, Harrison County, Henry Clay, 
Henry County, Lafayette, Millersburg Military Institute, Old- 
ham County, Paris, Shelbyville, Tates Creek, Woodford Coun- 
ty 

Covington Region - Beechwood, Boone County, Carroll 
County, Covington Catholic, Covington Latin, Dixie Heights, 
Holmes, Lloyd, Ludlow, Owen County, St. Henry, Simon- 
Kenton 

Maysville Region - Bishop Brossart, Campbell County, 
Dayton, Fleming County, Highlands, Mason County, Mays- 
ville, Newport, Newport Catholic, Pendleton, St. Patrick, 
Silver Grove 

London Region - Barbourville, Bell County, Berea, Harlan, 
James A. Cawood, Knox Central, Lee County, London, 
Lynch, Madison Central, Middlesboro, Model, Monticello, 
Puieville, Somerset, Williamsburg 

Paintsville Region - Boyd County, Elkhorn City, Fairview, 
Hazard, Holy Family, Jenkins, Johnson Central, Leather vDod, 
McKell, Paintsville, Paul G. Blazer, Pikeville, Prestons iurg, 
Russell, University Breckinridge 

RIFLE MARKSMANSHIP 

Fairdale, Louisville Male, McKell, Millersburg Military In- 
stitute, Oldham County, Owensboro, T .'aul G. Blazer, Seneca, 
Thomas Jefferson, Western (Sinai) 

TENNIS FOR GIRLS 

Murray Region - Henderson, Henderson County, Holy 
Name, Hopkinsville, Murray, Murray University, Paducah Til- 
ghman 

Bowling Green Region - Bowling Green, Campbellsville, 
Caverna, Elizabethtown, Franklin Simpson, Glasgow, Meade 
County, Russellville, University 

Louisville Region - Central, Kentucky Home, Loretto, 
Louisville Male, Mercy Academy, Presentation, Ursuline 

West Jefferson Region - Angelia Merici, Butler, Doss, Holy 
Rosary, Iroquois, Pleasure Ridge Park, Southern 

East Jefferson Region - Assumption, Ballard, Eastern, 
Jeffersontown, Sacred Heart, Seneca, Shelbyville, Waggener 

Bellevue Region - Beechwood, Bellevue, Boone County, 
Highlands, Lloyd, Ludlow, Newport, Villa Madonna 

Richmond Region - Hazel Green, Middlesboro, Model, 
Paul G. Blazer, Somerset, University Breckinridge 

Lexington Region - Bryan Station, Frankfort, Franklin 
County, Good Shepherd, Henry Clay, Lafayette, Tates Creek, 
Woodford County 

TENNIS FOR BOYS 

Murray Region - Caldwell County, Fort Campbell, Hen- 
derson, Henderson County, Hopkinsville, Murray, Murray 
University, North Marshall, Paducah Tilghman, St. Mary 

Bowling Green Region - Bowling Green, Caverna, Frank- 
lin-Simpson, Glasgow, Greensburg, Hart County, Ohio Coun- 
ty, Russellville, Tompkinsville, University 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH 1970 



Fort Knox Region - Campbellsville, Elizabethtown, Fort 
Knox, LaRue County, Meade County, iQorth Hardin, Owens- 
boro, Shelbyville 

Louisville Region - Atherton, Bishop David, Central, Fla- 
get, Kentucky Military Institute, Louisville Country Day, 
Louisville Male, St. Xavier, Trinity 

West Jefferson Region - Butler, Doss, Fairdale, Jesse Stuart, 
Pleasure Ridge Park, Southern, Valley, Western 

East Jefferson Region - Ballard, Durrett, Eastern, Fern 
Creek, Seneca, Thomas Jefferson, Waggener, Westport 

Lexington Region - Bryan Station, Frankfort, Franklin 
County, George Rogers Clark, Good Shepherd, Henry Clay, 
Lafayette, Maysville, Millersburg Military Institute, Sayre, 
Tates Creek, Woodford County 

Bellevue Region - Beechwood, Bellevue, Boone County, 
Covington Catholic, Highlands, Holmes, Lloyd, Ludlow, New- 
port, Newport Catholic 

Richmond Region - Berea, Harrodsburg, Hazel Green, 
Jessamine County, Middlesboro, Model, Paul G. Blazer, Som- 
erset, University Breckinridge 



ANNUAL MEETING SPEAKER 



BASEBALL CLINICS 

Under the requirements of K.H.S.A.A. By-Law 29-3, re- 
ristered baseball officials and head baseball coaches are re- 
quired to attend at least one rules interpretation clinic. 

The first official clinic is scheduled to be held on March 

30. The hour is 7:00 P.M. The sites are as follows: Mayfield 
High School, Brazelton Junior High School (Paducah), Hop- 
kinsville Community College, Madisonville-North Hopkins 
High School, Daviess County High School, Hughes-Kirk High 
School, Reservior Hill (Bowling Green), Elizabethtown High 
School, Campbellsville High School, Southern High School, 
Clark County High School, Collins Lane School (Frankfort), 
Washington County High School, Somerset High School, Clay 
County High School, Hazard High School, Johnson Central 
High School, Rowan County High School, Paul G. Blazer. A 
clinic is scheduled at the Beechwood High School on March 

31. The hour is 7:30. 

A 7:30 clinic is scheduled for the Maysville High School 
on April 3. Sites for the second series of clinics, scheduled 
to be held on April 5 at 2:00 P.M., are as follows: Murray 
High School, Brazelton Junior High School (Paducah), Rus- 
sellville High School, Crittenden County High School, Hen- 
derson High School, Livermore High School, Franklin Simp- 
son High School, Elizabethtown High School, Metcalfe Coun- 
ty High School, University of Louisville (Ball Diamond), Old- 
ham County High School, Bourbon County High School, 
Shelbyville High School, Boyle County High School. Somer- 
set High School, London High School, Whitesburg High 
School, Pikeville High School, Rowan County High School, 
Paul G. Blazer High School. 



Supplementary List of 
Registered Wrestling Officials 

(List Compiled March 1) 
Cline, Jack D., 1 1 8 Roan Road, Versailles 
Hardy, Thomas Wilson, Box 99 A, Route 1, California, 635- 

2253,635-2191 
Wolfe, Tony, 419 Huguelet Drive, Lexington 



CORRECTIONS 

In the February issue of the ATHLETE the 1970 as- 
signment of schools to track regions was listed. The name of 
Shopville should be deleted and Shepherdsville added in the 
Fort Knox Class AA Region for Girls. In the Richmond 
Region of Boys' Track Boyle County should have been listed 
in Class A. 




Harold A. Meyer 

Speaker at the dinner meeting of the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association, scheduled to be held in the Cry- 
stal Ballroom of the Brown Hotel, Louisville, on Thursday ev- 
ening, April 16, 1970, will be Dr. Harold A. Meyer, Commis- 
sioner or tne Ohio High School Athletic Association. 

Dr. Meyer was born in Erie, Pennsylvania. While attending 
high school in that city, he participated in football, basket- 
ball, track, swimming and water polo. He was captain of the 
water polo and football teams his senior year. After gradua- 
tion from high school he enrolled at Ohio University, winning 
freshman numerals in football and basketball. He attended 
the Edinboro State College for one year, lettering in basket- 
ball. Returning to Ohio University he completed his Bachel- 
ors' degree, majoring in Commerce and minoring in Physical 
Education and English. While at Ohio University he lettered 
in football and was on the wrestling squad. 

In the fall of 1934 Harold Meyer began his coaching ca- 
reer at Dennison High School, Dennison, Ohio, as an assist- 
ant in all sports. He became head football coach in 1935 and 
remained as such until he assumed the principalship of the 
high school in 1937. 

During World War II, Mr. Meyer served as a communica- 
tions officer aboard the U.S.S. Key, a destroyer escort at- 
tached to the Seventh Fleet. He participated in the invasions 
of Moratai, Tingayen, Balikpapen and Okinawa. 

In March of 1949 Mr. Meyer assumed the duties as Prin- 
cipal of the Martins Ferry High School, becoming Superin- 
tendent of Schools in 1950. He remained in this position 
until his appointment as Assistant Commissioner of the Ohio 
High School Athletic Association in 1963. 

Dr. Meyer earned his M. A. degree at Ohio State Univer- 
sity, and his D. Ed. degree at the University of Pittsburgh. 
Additional graduate work was taken at the University of 
Michigan. 

Dr. Meyer has served as the Chairman of the Resolutions 
Committee of the National Federation of State High School 
Athletic Associations since 1963. He also represents the Fed- 
eration as a member of the United State Baseball Federation. 
In 1965, he was appointed to the U. S.Olympic Committee- 
Women's Track and Field for the 1968 Olympic Games and 
is again serving in the same capacity for the 1972 Olympic 
Games. 

Dr. Meyer has been active in many civic and church ac- 
tivities. He served as Chapter Chairman of the Martins Ferry 
Red Cross, Executive Committee of the Community Chest, a 
member and director of the Chamber of Commerce and Boy 
Scout work in various capacities. He is a member of the 
Worthington Presbyterian Church. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH 1970 



Page Five 



KAPOS NEWS 
ATTENTION: Principals and Cheerleader Sponsors! 

Is your school a paid-up member of K.A.P.O.S.? If you 
are, and your school is the winner of your region, your cheer- 
leader squad will be eligible to compete for the top award: 
Outstanding Cheerleader Squad in the State Tournament. 

Included in the packet that will be given (by the KHSAA) 
to each winner in the regional tournament finals will be a 
letter pertaining to cheerleaders. The letter will contain the 
information concerning the basis of selecting outstanding 
cheerleader squads, and will request that the principal send 
written confirmation that the cheerleaders of his school are 
being chaperoned by a well-qualified, school-approved adult. 
The name of the sponsor should be included in this confir- 
mation letter and given to the KAPOS board member at the 
registration booth in the lobby of the Kentucky Hotel. Chap- 
erones must room with or on the same floor with their squads. 

Registration For Cheerleaders 

Please stop by the "Welcome Booth" in the lobby of the 
Kentucky Hotel to: 

1. Register your squad 

2. Get your hotel room assignment 

3. Pick up your envelope which contains the KAPOS hand- 
book and other tournament information. 

Along with a KAPOS board member there will be high 
school cheerleaders on hand to assist you. They can be iden- 
tified by their hostess armbands. Feel free to ask them for 
help, and in turn they may seek you or your cheerleaders to 
be interviewed by one of the radio commentators. In order to 
make their task easier, we are asking that you register your 
seat, row and section number. A possible radio interview is of- 
ten missed because the guides cannot locate the desired per- 
son in time for the interview. 

Hospitality Room 

May we remind all sponsors and cheerleaders that KAPOS 
has a Hospitality Room, located in Freedom HalL Besides the 
opportunity to socialize with friends, exchange ideas, and per- 
haps get help with your problems, you can have free refresh- 
ments. Be sure to register when you come to the Hospitality 
Room. 

State-at-Large and State Tournament Champions 

Beginning with the District Tournaments, all squads that 
are paid up members of KAPOS are eligible to compete for 
the honor of representing that District in their Region. The 
winner from each Region is eligible to compete for the title 
of Champion-of-the-State-at-Large. 

Judging for the State-at-Large winner will take place at 
8:30 A.M. on Friday in Freedom Hall. Admittance to Free- 
dom Hall will be upon proper identification of each squad by 
the approved adult chaperon or sponsor. 

It is possible for the winner of the State Tournament to be 
also the winner of the State-at-Large. The judging instrument 
to be used for the State-at-Large competition will be identical 
to the one used in the region. The instrument to be used for 
the State Tournament will be enclosed in the packet given out 
by the KHSAA officials to the respective winners of the 16 
regions. 

Governor Nunn Declares Sportsmanship Week 

While every week should be Good Sportsmanship Week, 
KAPOS has always tried to put special emphasis on being a 
good sport at State Tournament time. Being a good sport is 
part of being a good citizen. KAPOS doesn't believe that good 
citizens need to be reminded to exemplify good sportsman- 
ship. However, it is especially fitting at tournament time to 
remind all citizens that it is a privilege to be able to attend 
the games, and that each individual can contribute to the suc- 
cess of the tournament if he will abide by the KAPOS Sports- 
manship Creed proclaimed by Governor Nunn: 

Proclamation 

Whereas, the Kentucky Association of Pep Organization 
Sponsors upholds all standards of good sportsmanship as its 
aim; and 



Whereas, KAPOS believes that good sportsmanship con- 
tributes to the foundation of the democratic way of life 
through the application of the Golden Rule; and 

Whereas, KAPOS urges that the ideals of good sportsman- 
ship be practiced not only during this week but throughout 
the year; and 

Whereas, the Kentucky High School Basketball Tourna- 
ment will be held during this week and the majority of Ken- 
tuckians will be following the games; and 

Whereas, good sportsmanship is the obligation of all citi- 
zens, and Kentuckians need to be made aware of this respon- 
sibility; 

NOW; THEREFORE, 1, Louie B. Nunn, Governor of the 
State of Kentucky, do hereby proclaim this week as Good 
Sportsmanship Week in Kentucky, and urge all citizens of this 
state to unhold all standards of good sportsmanship not only 
during the tournament but at all times. 

Summer Cheerleader Clinic News And Dates 

The Cheerleader Association endorses the N.E.A philo- 
sophy that there should be a separation of the age groups. So, 
if we operate under the premise that our educational system 
has a sound basis for grouping children in elementary, junior 
high, and secondary scholastically, then the same philosophy 
should prevail in grouping youngsters in all other activities. 
For some time we have heard sponsors of the junior high age 
group say that their cheerleaders were not physically, emot- 
ionally or mentally mature enough to compete or associate 
with the eleventh and twelfth grade cheerleaders. Therefore, 
we are planning to pioneer in this area. 

Junior High— Senior High Clinic (July 1 2th-l 6th) 

Both clinics will be held on the University of Kentucky 
campus. The two groups will be housed separately. Classes 
and lectures will be geared to the interest and ability of the 
respective groups. This could be an opportune time to talk 
about a KAPOS organization for all sponsors of junior high 
squads. 

Brochures giving details of the clinic can be obtained at 
the State Tournament KAPOS booth or by contacting Mrs. 
Grace Fragstein (Lafayette High School), Mrs. Milly Rodes 
(Transylvania College), and Mrs. Stella S. Gilb (University of 
Kentucky), all addressed to Lexington, Kentucky. 

Note To All Administrators 

Many of you have responded to our SOS in releasing teach- 
ing personnel to assist with the many tasks necessary to keep 
this organization functioning effectively. Again, we need 
judges, hotel chaperones, and personnel to man booths at the 
hotel and at Freedom Hall. This involves at least 12 to 16 
people. It is also backbreaking, tiresome work. However, we 
have many dedicated women who have indicated a willing- 
ness to help share these duties provided they get an OK from 
their administrators. Therefore, the KAPOS board is seeking 
your understanding and cooperation, should you be asked to 
release a teacher from her duties to help carry on the work 
that KAPOS is doing to make cheerleading a worthwhile ed- 
ucational experience in the State of Kentucky. 

Awarding Of Trophies 

State Champion-at-Large: The winner will receive the Ted 
Sanford trophy while the runner-up will receive the Jane 
Meyer trophy. Ribbons will be given for honorable mention. 
These awards will be given during the halftime of the first 
game Friday afternoon. 

State Tournament: Winner, first place trophy; runner-up, 
second place trophy; honorable mention, ribbon. These a- 
wards will be given at the close of the final game on Saturday 
night. All cheerleaders are asked to wear their uniforms and 
to assemble in the KAPOS Hospitality Room during the half- 
time of the final game. All cheerleaders will then proceed to 
one of the end entrances where the winners will have easy 
access to the playing floor. 

Sponsors of the competing 16 cheerleader groups are asked 
to come to the floor with their squads. Besides getting the re- 
cognition you so well deserve, it is another way of letting the 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH 1970 



public know that cheerleading is important enough in the 
school's curriculum to merit a well-qualified "sponsor-coach- 
chaperon." 

Reminder 

It is time to send in credentials for scholarship candidates. 
Miss Jackie Ann Blair, our sixth scholarship winner, is a fresh- 
man at Western Kentucky University. We have reason to be 
very proud of Jackie. Out of a possible 4 point standing, she 
has a 3.625. Jackie is a graduate of Greenville High School. 
Miss Joanna Fox, her sponsor, proposed her. You too; may 
have a potential seventh scholarship winner. Get your appli- 
cations in early. Write our President, Mrs. John Compton, 
Bryan Station High School, Lexington, Kentucky, for ap- 
plication forms, or pick them up at the KAPOS booth in 
Freedom Hall. 

Stella S. Gilb 

Executive Secretary-Treasurer 



Registered Baseball Officials 

(List Compiled March 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone unless otherwise designated. If two numbers 
are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Anderson, Luther S-, Liberty Hts., Route 2, Carlisle, 289- 

2364. 233-2000 
Asher, Ralph, Box 232, Olive Hill, 286-4537, 286-2081 
Ashley, Kenneth, Science Hill, 423-3215, 678-4942 
Atchison, lames, Dry Ridge, 824-5877, 823-2881 
Atwell, Darryl, R.R. 1, Hardyville, 528-2364, 528-2271 

Ballenger, L. E., R.R. 1, Hanover, Indiana, 866-3651, 866- 

2145 
Barker, Phillip Michael, P. O. Box 269, Olive Hill, 286-4402 
Bertsch, Ronald L., 65 Geiger, BeUevue, 581-5790, 731-2012 
Bishop, Edward L., 2017 Scott Street, Covington, 431-5203, 

922-4080 
Blair, Kenneth, P. O. Box 224, Hindman, 785-5844, 785-5844 
Bourne, Pugh, Jr., 46 Sweetbay Cove, Jackson, 424-3312, 

427-6606 
Bouse, Robert M., 452 Boone Trail, Danville, 236-2192 
Bowling, Kenneth, P. O. Box 171. Harlan. 573-5589 
Branham. Mason, Jr., Box 1, Grahn, 286-4363 
Brantley, Kenneth Larry, Box 117, Cumberland, 589-2054, 

589-4983 
Breeden, Donald B., Route 6, Benton, Paducah 898-3964, 

Calvert City 395-4400 
Brock,. Charles Le Verne, 202 Kentucky Avenue, Corbin, 528- 

5808 (Bus.) 
Brock, Johnnie G., Stoney Fork, 337-3752 
Brooks, Michael, 115 Liberty Court, Hopkinsville, 885-5192 
Brown, Billy C, 366 Big Hill Avenue, Richmond, 623-7529, 

623,3541 
Browne, Jerome F., Box 796, Calvert City, 395-4338, 395- 

4600 
Burgess, Richard N., Box 452, BardweU, 628-3527, 628-5411 
Bushkar, John, 638 Monticello Blvd., Lexington, 278-4670, 

278-4670 
Burner, Billy M., P. O. Box 616, Lancaster, 792-3503, 925 

2711 

Callahan, Gary, 401 Skyline Park Drive, Hopkinsville, 886- 

5026 
Callis, Herbert D., 1646 E. 17th. Street, Bowling Green, 842- 

2348, 842-5351 
Carlberg, John H., 227 Main, Muldraugh, 942-2723, 942-2730 
Carr, Billy W., Longview Drive, Franklin, 586-6355 
Chumbley, Ron, Jamestown, 343-9052, 866-2545 
Claypool, Thomas W., Route 2, Owensboro, 684-8719, 684- 

5285 
Clemens, Glen C, 1012 Allison Lane, Jeffersonville, Indiana, 

282-7498, 636-3711 
Cline, Roy E., 1194 Lincoln, Louisville, 637-8249 
Cook, Bobby, 268 Brockton, Richmond, 623-61 86 
Cornwell, James, 506 South Main, Franklin, 586-4327, 586- 

4451 
Cottrell, David, 605 Shawnee Road, Danville, 236-3883, 236- 

7957 



Minutes of Board Meeting 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky High School Ath- 
letic Association met in called session at the Campbell House, 
Lexington, Kentucky, on February 25, 1970, with all Board 
members. Commissioner Theo. A. Sanford, and Assistant 
Commissioners J. B. Mansfield and Billy V. Wise present The 
meeting was called to order at 5:00 P.M. The invocation was 
given by W. H. Crowdus. 

President Dorsey stated that he had called the meeting 
following a request received from th„ Kentucky Education 
Association through its Executive Secretary J. M. Dodson 
that the Board re-schedule the forthcoming basketball tour- 
naments after settlement of the current school crisis. 

Each Board member spoke at length concerning the sit- 
uation as it existed in his Section with respect to the current 
work stoppage. Commissioner Sanford and Assistant Com- 
missioner Mansfield were asked by President Dorsey to give 
their assessment of the situation, with respect to commit- 
ments having been made at the state tournament level These 
commitments were discussed as they related to Freedom Hall 
rental and availability at later dates, television, radio, advance 
ticket sales and lodging reservations for tournament teams and 
fans. 

After much deliberation on the part of Board members, 
Tom Mills moved, seconded by Richard Vincent, that the 
Commissioner be directed to proceed with tournament plans 
as set forth in the regulations of the Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association. The motion was carried unanimously. 

The Board directed the Commissioner to send the follow- 
ing telegram to Executive Secretary J. M. Dodson of the Ken- 
tucky Education Association: "In compliance with your re- 
quest, the Board of Control of the Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association has met to consider re-scheduling basket- 
ball tournaments after settlement of the current school crisis 
in Kentucky. After much deliberation, because of commit- 
ments which should be met and with the welfare of our high 
school athletes in mind, the Board by unanimous vote has 
directed me as Commissioner to proceed with tournament 
plans as set forth hi the regulations of the Association. Now 
that your request has been granted and acted upon, we sug- 
gest that you recommend to your group that the resolution 
concerning high school athletics be rescinded in line with 
your stated worthy objective of putting kids first Our Board 
realizes of course that the decision to allow our basketball 
teams to compete in the forthcoming district tournaments 
does not rest witn the Kentucky Education Association or 
the K-H.S.A. A. Board of Control but with the local Boards 
of Education." 

There being no further business, the meeting adjourned. 



Crager, Bobby F., 100 Clark Street, Flatwoods, 836-6069, 

836-5623 
Craycroft, Harry, Box 263, Brandenburg, 422-2630, 422-3214 
Crowe, William Michael, Box 34, Stanton 
Culp, Willard E., 318 Skyline Park Drive, Hopkinsville, 886- 

7967, 886-7557 
Curnutte, Ivan M., 511 Columbia Road, Greensburg, 932- 

5047, 932-5231 

Daniels, Robert A., P. O. Box 2, Van Lear, 789-3931, 789- 

4932 
Davenport, James E., 9810 Dawson Hill Road, Jeffersontown, 

239-5667, 452-4413 
Dean, Jerry W., McKee. 287-7301, 287-7161 
Denton, William D., 14 Clore Court, Henderson, 827-3409, 

826-3733 
Dickinson, Ruddie L., R. R. 5, Box 180, Olive Hill, 286-2194 
Divine, Wayne L., 626 Walnut Street, Central City, 754-2783, 

754-2272 
Drivers, Bob, Route 1, Scottsville, 237-4005, 237-3841 
Duerson, William Robert, Route 2, Paint Lick, 925-2357, 

925-2711 
Duncan, James T., Route 2, Russellville, 726-2802, 726-9531 
Dunn, Chesley, Route 4, Hopkinsville, 886-4394 
Durbin, Roy V., 2911 Dale Ann Drive, Louisville. 452-1730, 

587-1121, Ext. 237 
Dwyer, James \- , Jr., 5020 Mile of Sunshine Drive. Louis- 
ville, 964-6894 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH 1970 



Page Seven 



Elliott, Billy A., 1122 Castlewood PL, Owensboro, 685-3393 
Elliott, Carroll L., 307 College, Elizabethtovvn, 765-4007, 

765-6118 
Elmore, Jimmy A., Brandenburg, 422-2465, 422-3214 
Emery, George A, 234 Clay Street, New Albany, Indiana, 

944-5257, 283-3511, Ext. 254 
Evitts, Harold E., Box 167 A., Luzerne Drive, Greenville, 

338-2970, 338-2970 
Eyl, Eddie, 2252 Bradford Drive, Louisville, 442-1001 

Fenton, Don J., 4890 Oaklawn Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio, 271- 

3792, 751-4344 
Flynn, Joseph Lloyd, P. O. Box 156, Frankfort, 227-2658 
Foust, Ray, Jr., Box 677, Calvert City, 395-4901 
Frankel, Louis S., 3723 Stanton Blvd., Louisville, 454-6519, 

454-6519 
Fritsch, William Stephen, 426 Marquette Drive, Louisville, 

623-9981 
Frymire, Leslie H., Irvington, 547-2553, 547-3951 
Furnish, Gary L., 303 Bays Avenue, Morehead, 784-7646 

Gaines, Curtis, 1514 Young, Henderson, 826-9933, 827-3537 
Gardner, Gary, Route 3, Magnolia, 528-2947, 528-2947 
Garland, Danny A., 1220 Dale Avenue, Frankfort, 223-8608 
Gibbons, Mike, 2733 Carolyn, Ashland, 324,2056 
Gibson, Junior Lee, Clarkson, 242-3551, 242-2171 
Giordano, Al, 107 Ratliff, Princeton, 365-5680, 365-5615 
Glass, Frank, 2004 Deauville Drive, Lexington, 2 55-1798 
Glass, K. L., 108 Adkins Street, Clarksville, Tennessee, 648- 

2056 
Goetz, Herbert, 35 Linet Avenue, Highland Heights, 441-2825 
Goodman, Bennie Ray, East View, 862-4638, 862-3924 
Gour, Bob, 218 S. Lee, Bowling Green, 843-9582, 842-9431 
Green, Donald P., 832 Brand, Mayfield, 247-6038, 247-6038 
Gupton, Lawrence, 105 Hillview, Greensburg, 932-5001, 465- 

4101 

Hamilton, Mike D., Circle Drive, South Shore, 932-4673, 932- 

3757 
Hammons, George F., Box 23, Barbourville, 546-4589, 546- 

4022 
Handley, Sam, Hodgenville, 358-4773, 358-3195 
Hardin, Don G., Box 88, Morehead, 784-7698 
Hardin, William E., Mackville Hill, Springfield, 336-7128 
Hargo, Austin A., 108 Airport Road, Clarksville, Tennessee, 

431-3781, 798-3781 
Hazelwood, Howard P., 1211 Devonport Drive, Lexington, 

252-5112,254-8031 
Hendrix, Jack, 415 S. Mill, London, 864-2075, Richmond, 

864-2331 
Henry, James, II, 1501 Cowling Avenue, Louisville, 451-2770, 

587-6923 
Hensley, Larry Gene, Box 164, Belfry, 353-4295, 235-4242 
Hensley, Larry O., Box 572, Lexington, 255-9346, 299-1221, 

Ext. 6102 
Hill, Clyde E., Box 117, Williamsburg, 549-2666, 549-1360 
Hilton, Billy, 323 Maplewood Avenue, Springfield, 336-7594 
Hina, Henry B., Route 1, Sturgis, 333-5933, 333-4008 
Hinton, Henry G., 1210 Witawanga, Lyndon, 425-7627 
Hollings worth, Henry R., Box 481, Elkton, 265-2340, 265- 

2545 
Hord, Tracy, Star Route, Lebanon, 692-3612 
Horton, John L., Route 2, Owensboro, 683-5234, 684-5285 
Houchens, Joe Danny, Route 4, Glasgow, 678-2317, 651- 

8341 
Hubbs, Sonny, 260 Old Orchard Road, Paducah, 442-8978, 

443-5177 
Huggins, James F., 5304 Sennridge Lane, No. 5, Valley Sta- 
tion, 935-5251 
Hurt, Thomas C, 122 Hamilton Avenue, Lancaster, 792-3067, 

792-2312 

Ingram, William R., Det. C, 12th. M. P. GP. (C), Ft. Knox, 

624-4898, 624-7455 
Johnson, Harry B., 3024 Stanford Drive, Lexington, 277- 

2889, 266-0532 



Johnson, Willis Clayton, Leon Road, Grayson, 474-5386 

Joiner, Bruce, 1000 Central, Hopkinsville, 886-1471 

Jones, Frank, Route 1, Box 288, Manchester, 598-2305, 598- 

5242 
Jones, James Ervin, 1804 Oak Street, Hopkinsville, 886-8050, 

798-6903 
Jones, Joe S., 203 Green Street, Manchester, 598-3793, 598- 

2129 
Jump, Frank E., 200 Elizabeth Street, Bowling Green, 842- 

8060, 843-4707 

Kasperski, Harry W., 3652., "B" Fincastle Road, Louisville 

451-1065, 582-5215 
Kaufman, Alvin R., 8215 St. Anthony Church Road, Louis- 
ville, 366-0126, 587-0871 
Kays, AUie, Route 5, Box 75B, ShelbyvUIe, 633-3203 
Keeling, Reuben, 3757 Ramona Drive, Paducah, 442-4190 
Kidwell,, James S., 1112 Parkway, Covington, 291-6856 
Kimmel, Jerry, Beechmont, 476-2656, 476-8375 
King, James A, 5000 Clarrnar, Jeffersontown, 239-8015, 778- 

2791 
Kinney, Paul C, RR 2, Williamstown, 824-5140 
Kirk, Charles, Main Street, Benham, 848-2039 
Kouns, Robert H., Box 582, South Shore, 932-4540, 932- 

3323 
Kuhl, Lawrence, Houser Lane, London, 864-6235, 864-4182 

Lamb, Paul, 427 Carlisle Avenue, Lexington, 255-4126, 255- 

6666 
Landers, John F., Route 4, Box 221, Clarksville, Tennessee, 

647-2656, 798-6805 
LaRue, William D., Jr., Salem, 988-3138, 988-7562 
Laskey, George O., Box M, Beattyville, 464-2509, 464-2767 
Laugherty, Kenneth Ray, 2100 Peabody Lane, Louisville, 

451-1706, 584-1211 
Leigh, Eugene F., 506 17th. Street, Corbin, 528-1501, 528- 

1212, Ext. 35 
Levy, Arthur E., Mt. Rt. 2, Box 74A, Williamson, West Va., 

237-1171, 237-1010 
Lewis, Dennis, 519 N. 4th., Bardstown, 348-9269, 348-5914 
Lindsey, Eugene M., Route 3, ShelbyvUIe, 633-3829, 633- 

2471 
Littlepage, Pryce, 665 Echo Lane, Madisonville, 821-1642 
Logsdon, Charles, 550 Gates Road, Elizabethtown, 769-2253, 

769-3388 
Louden, James, 10 Smith Street, Florence, 371-7699, 621- 

6491 
Lovell, Monty Joe, 429 Oak Street, Richmond, 623-1304, 

623-4959 

McCoy, Gary W., 666 Emerson Drive, Lexington, 252-1020, 

252-9094 
McDonald, Walter Dixon, RR 1, Box 79, Corydon, 533-6637, 

827-2506 
McDowell, Charles V., 2419 Roosevelt, Ashland, 325-2886, 

325-8511, Ext. 731 
McKinney, Adelle F., 5th. Fid. Hospital, APO 96346, San 

Francisco 
McKinney, Tony, Morgantown, 526-4698, 526-3662 
McMillin, Larry, P. O. Box 178, Crestwood, 241-8998, 241- 

4458 
Manasco, Norman, 402 E. Wilson, Earlington, 383-5360, 383- 

5511 
Marion, James Lee, 303 Cleveland Avenue, Glasgow, 651- 

5241 
Marlette, Ronald L., 1004 Delia Drive, Lexington, 278-6374 
Martin, Charlie, Sharpsburg, 247-2141, 247-3031 
Mason, George, 20 Summerhill, S. Newport, 581-3434, 421- 

6815 
Mattingly, Charles "Pete", 3813 Poplar Level, Louisville, 459- 

5793, 448-2761 
May, Douglas, Route 1, Box 539, Pikeville, 437-6512 
Melmige, James, Jr., Box 21 17, Williamson, West Va. 
Meredith, M. Kenneth, 9905 Stone Street Road, Louisville, 

935-4607, 634-1551, Ext. 296 
Meredith, Thomas Louis, 7100 Ky. Avenue, Pleasure Ridge 

Park, 935-1272 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH 1970 



Metcalf, Ken, Muntordville, 524-9704, 524-9341 
Meyers, John F., Box 513, Maysville, 564-3535, 759-7141 

Milby, W. C, Route 3, Box 165, Greensburg, 932-5692 
MUls, J. F., Route 3, Marion, 965-3683, 965-3186 
Mooneyhan, James H., 810 Henry Street, Franklin, 586-4989, 

586-4451 
Morgan, Richard, Route 6, Box 64, London, 864-6511, 864- 

5114 
Morse, Richard K., 163 N. Deepwood, Radcliff, 351-3748, 

Ft. Knox 624-4454 
Mulligan, J. T., 427 Center Street, Erlanger, 341-5628, 341- 

5628 
Mullins, Arthur, Elkhorn City, 754-4041, 754-7981 
Mullins, Charles E., Schultz Road, South Shore, 932-3388, 

932-3388 



Nash, Lloyd R., 725 Walnut Park Crive, Ownesboro, 683- 

5871 
Neal, Alan, 1327 College, Apt. 14, Bowling Green, 843-9404, 

842-5696 
Nolan, Michael Bruce, 36 W. Morgantown Road, Bowling 

Green, 842-8978 
Noland, Douglas, 305 Herndon Avenue, Stanford, 365-2609, 

365-2619 
Norwood, Donald V., Strawberry Lane, Franklin, 586-5119, 

586-4636 
Norwood, Thomas Richard, 81 1 Henry Street, Franklin, 586- 

3614, 586-3541 

Omer, Harold, 150 N. Crestmoor, Louisville 
Orem, Dale L., 409 Chippewa Drive, Jeffersonville, Indiana, 
283-8225, 636-4151 

Pack, James R., Stambaugh, 265-4848, 789-5273 

Pardue, Israel L., 1005 So. 28th., Louisville, 772-2488, 774- 

6431 
Parkey, Cecil Edward, 109 Greenwood Road, Middlesboro, 

248-6148, 445-4094 
Payne, Bob, Route 1, Maceo, 264-1379, 684-4251 
Penner, Merritt D., Jr., Route 4, Box 739, Manchester, 598- 

3711 
Pietrowski, Paul, 108 Bishop, Corbin, 528-6391, 528-1630 
Pollock, Robert, Irvington, 547-6341 
Price, James E., Route 4, Box 22, Liberty, 787-7296, 787- 

6323 
Primm, James T., Route 1, Lafayette Road, Hopkinsville, 

885-9483 
Pyle, John Wayne, 91114 Central, Hopkinsville, 886-8197, 

798-3316 

Quisenberry, James M., 1900 Farnsley Road, Louisville, 448- 
6152, 366-0940 

Raines, J. W., 1117 Lebanon Road, Danville, 236-3380 
Ramey, Herbert D., Farmers, 784-4724, 784-7726 
Reif, Harry F., Route 2, Eminence, 346-5284, 346-8421 
Reining, Dan, P. O. Box 582, Shepherdsville, 543-2633, 543- 

2633 
Richards, Ed, 6316 Gayle Drive, Louisville, 969-3484 
Ring, Bill, 481 Rookwood Parkway, Lexington, 299-7089, 

255-8492 
Robinson, Harvey Lewis, Box 579, Pikeville, 432-2895, 432- 

3380 
Rogers, Eldridge, 310 Talbert, Hopkinsville, 885-5571, 885- 

3921 
Royce, Walter L., 3232 Hampton Street, Ashland, 325-7994, 

324-1111, Ext. 6247 

Salyer, Henry Edsel, 4817 Bluebird, Louisville, 969-6371, 

634-1511, Ext. 71 
Sammons, John I., 1 105 Elm, Murray, 753-5738, 753-3642 
Sandusky, Jerry, Route 1, Liberty, 787-7742, 787-7484 
Satterly, Grant, 832 Shelby Street, Frankfort, 223-3810 
Saylors, Carlee, Route 6, Murray, 753-7979, 924-5602 
Scott, Bill, 1816 McDonald Road, Lexington, 278-2844, 254- 

1313 



Scott, Travis Paul, Route 2, Box 317, Russell Springs, 866- 

1133, 384-2933 
Sexton, Steven Carroll, 9126 Edmonston Terrace, Greenbelt, 

Maryland, 474-4591, 964-4815 
Sharp, Ronnie, Box 304, Middlesboro, 248-3916, 337-3093 
Shaw, Earl, 121 Hagan Court, Lancaster 
Simons, Ray D., 3489 Lansdowne Drive, Bldg. D., Apt. 19, 

Lexington, 278-9184, 621-8360 
Sipes, Robert L., Jr., Box 351, Irvington, 547-5511 
Smith, Benny, Route 3, Box 5, Manchester, 598-2461 
Smith, W. Jack, 203 Ohio, Somerset, 679-1211, 252-6602 
Smith, WiUard N., P. O. Box 23, Campbellsville, 465-5339, 

465-4191 
Smithson, Richard A., 821 Palatka Road, Louisville, 368- 

2853, 935-2948 
Staten, Gordon Lee, Route 2, Falmouth, 654-8660, 654-3977 
Stethen, James E., Box 1 34, Bedford, 255-3285 
Strain, Richard P., P. O. Box 472, Radcliff, 351-4306, 624- 

2214 
Strasburger, Charles, Bogle Tr. Park, Lot No. 1, Russellville 

Road, Bowling Green, 879-6263 
Stratton, Robert J., Eastview, Shelbyville, 635-3816, 633- 

1612 
Stratton, Robert Wayne, Glenn Avenue, Route 3, Shelbyville 
Sullivan, Don Chris, 2083 Nassau Road, Lexington, 277-6953, 

277-6953 
Sullivan, Howard, 111 Evergreen Drive, Lawrenceborg, 839- 

4177, 873-3181 
Sullivan, William H., Ill Evergreen Drive, Lawrenceburg, 

839-4177,839-3061 
Swinford, James W., 5502 Oak Creek Lane, Fern Creek, 239- 

0055, 448-2761, Ext. 222 

Tarry, W. R. "Bud", Route 5, Glasgow, 678-2539 

Tarter, Lloyd K, 205 Allison, Greenville, 338-3590, 338-4631 

Taylor, Carl D., 408 Bellefonte-Princess Road, Ashland, 325- 

2606, 324-3144 
Taylor, Ed, 435 N. 41st. Street, Louisville, 772-0126, 584- 

6311 
Taylor, John O., 803 East Drive, Box 48, Danville, 236-3915, 

236-3181 
Thomas, Bill, 3418 Burrell Drive, Louisville, 447-7521 
Thomas Paul E., P. O. Box 435 A, Franklin Furnace, Ohio, 

574-51 11, 574-5111 
Tines, Ronald W., Skyline Mobile Home Park, No. 24, Bow- 
ling Green, 781-2007, 842-1681 
Tyre, Donald, 316 Senate Drive, Frankfort, 223-3668, Lex- 
ington, 254-6612, Ext. 244 



Upton, Leon, Route 1, Greensburg, 932-5174, 932-4996 
Urlage, Richard, 822 Highland, Ft. Thomas, 441-5513, 471- 
8120 

Varble, William, 3108 Widgeon Avenue, Louisville, 635-6930, 

772-2509 
Varner, Ray G., 737 Kingston Road, Lexingtion, 299-4145 

Wagner, Marvin Rudy, Route 1, Box 445, Pikeville, 437-4611, 

432-3380 
Waller, Bobbie E., 309 Strathmore, Lexington, 299-6123, 

299-6123 
Wallin, Charles. 668 Northside Drive, Lexington, 299-8639, 

299-1221, Ext. 4251 
Ward, Tommy, Marsee Drive, Harlan, 573-4653, 573-3711 
Washer, Jamie Don, 1 10 Broach Avenue, South, Murray, 753- 

5330, 753-5313 
Watts, Frank C, P. O. Box 475, London, 348-3977, 348- 

3363 
Webb, James Otis, Box 94, Horse Cave, 786-2195, 786-2195 
Wells, Wayne, 910 Gardenia, CampbeUsville, 465-8434, 465- 

8736 
Wesche, James A., 1704 Chickasaw, Lexington, 299-8058, 

252-2312 
White, John Stanley, 1517 Fairfax Drive, Ashland, 325-2090, 

325-2090 
Wicicham, James Robert, 311 Cathedral Manor, Bardstown, 

348-5282, 833-4611 






THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH 1970 



Page Nine 



Williams, Bobby Gene, East View, 862-4664, 862-3924 
Williams, S. Jack, 323 Steele, Frankfort, 223-5078, 564-5586 
Williamson, Junior, Cline Street, Pikeville 
Wilson, Philip M., 5003 Dreamers Way, Louisville, 964-6234 
Winfrey, Shelby, 315 Sharon Drive, Campbellsville, 465-8392, 

465-5681 
Wingfield, Felix G., 1132 Eastern Parkway, Louisville 636- 

2282, 636-2282 
Wise, Dale, Tollesboro Christian Church, Tollesboro, 798- 

3691 
Wiseman, Melvin, 410 Broadway, Irvine, 723-2836, 723-9935 
Wood, Thomas David, 1314 Rammers Avenue, Louisville, 

634-9334, 587-8411 
Woosley, James R., Caneyville, 879-3375 
Wren, Bethel, Route 2, Paint Lick, 792-2751 
Wright, David H., 11711 Pierce Way, Valley Station, 937- 

4982, 937-4982 
Wright, John David, 442 Mclean Avenue, Hopkinsville, 885- 

9915, 886-3921 
Wyatt, William T., P. O. Box 875, Bowling Green, 843-8098, 

842-9431 
Wylie, Wayne T., 737 Lakeview Drive, Lexington, 254-3055, 

252-2312 

Yewell, Morgan R., Jr., 475 Flamingo, Frankfort, 875-2745 

Zitnheld, Leonard, 9105 Blue Lick Road, Louisville, 969- 
5925 



THINKERS AND DOERS 

(Continued from Page One) 
tween 40 and 60 as a generation. What has been accomplished 
in the time that we have held the custody of the society? 
For one thing, we have given more foreign aid to more coun- 
tries than all other countries have given in the history of the 
world since recorded history began. To more than 100 differ- 
ent countries, we have poured out tens of billions of dollars 
worth of American treasure. Our generation has built more 
schools, more libraries and more hospitals in the United States 
than have been built by all other countries combined in the 
last thousand years. We have conquered polio, diphtheria, TB, 
and a host of other diseases that used to cause anguish and 
heartbreak and sorrow across the country. None of them are 
any longer a matter of concern. We have developed and pro- 
duced the airplane, the automobile, radio, TV, computers 
and, unless our plans go awry, we will land men on the moon 
before this month is out. Our generation has created legis- 
lation and made court decisions which have done more by 
the minority groups of the United States than have been done 
throughout the history in all the history of the United States. 
Our generation has increased the real income, and by real in- 
come I mean the ability to buy material things, of the work- 
men of the United States until we have created an aristocracy 
of workmen. Many cars, many gadgets, television, washers, 
dryers, long vacations, air conditioning, all these things are 
accepted, taken for granted by men who have little education 
who work for their living with their hands. 

All this has been done in our time and yet a group of 
young people (16, 17, 18, 19, and 20) point the finger of 
jcom at our generation and say we have failed in our mission. 
We have failed as custodians of the society. Well, I would sub- 
mit that where we have failed is in our affluence, in our com- 
passion, in our soft heartedness, in our determination to make 
sure that our children had what we never did have, we have 
denied them those things they needed worse-discipline, stan- 
dards and competition. We have read Dr. Freud and allowed 
our children to read him and believed that when our children 
were surly, ungrateful and rude, that it was because they had 
a problem with sibling rivalry or that they had an over-dom- 
inate mother or that something mysterious had happened in 
the first two or three years of their life in relation to the 
wrong kind of covers in their cribs, or the wrong substance 
in the nipples of the bottles. And we've closed our eyes to the 
fact that the reason that they are rude and surly and ungrate- 
ful is that we have denied them the discipline that they de- 
served and needed from us. We have read Dr. Spock and be- 



lieve that if our children were under-achievers, tested well 
but made all "D's" and "F's" that the fault was that we had 
not been permissive enough with them when they were young, 
and that we had cramped their psychies and had not given 
them sufficient love and tenderness, compassion and closed 
our eyes to the fact that the real truth was that we had denied 
them the standards that they should have had. We didn't set 
standards and insist that they maintain them. We have listened 
to our friends at countless cocktail parties tell how Johnny 
tests in the genius line but somehow we just can't get him to 
work, and we have closed our eyes to the fact that we never 
really have insisted that our children compete. 

We have always been afraid of competition for our child- 
ren because it might put them in ordinal listing where one 
would be better than the others, and one might finish first 
where the other would finish last. We grew up with that kind 
of competition and we have protected them from it and by 
protecting them from it we have denied them an important 
birthright. We have listened to a group of progressive educa- 
tionalists who have said that you can't teach self-discipline by 
imposing discipline which is about as large a myth or simply 
a misstatement or misunderstanding as anything 1 know. 

I feel that at Annapolis, we have known something about 
this for a number of years and there is only one way to teach 
self-discipline and that is to lay discipline on in the younger 
years and then take it off gradually as people mature and, if 
we expect them to teach themselves self-discipline, we are ex- 
pecting what never will be and never has been. We don't set 
standards and yet we wonder why our children, as the boy in 
the Graduate, come home, are seduced by one of our con- 
temporaries' wives, and then complain that everything is all 
like plastic. 

When we were young, we used to read Lewis Carroll's 
story of the Red Queen in Through the Looking Glass. Per- 
haps you can remember her croquet game and other competi- 
tions she held in which the Red Queen insisted that everyone 
get a prize for everyone had won. Everyone was really the 
best. We thought that this was Lewis Carroll's nonsens i but 
it really is a description of much of high school and coi lege 
society today. Everyone must have a prize-don't mak : or- 
dinal listing of the class for God Sake, don't let him kno^y he 
is first or last or in the middle, you might cramp his psyche. 
Everyone must have a prize for everyone is best. 

1 suppose you could ask at this pjint, "Well, Admiral, 
that's great but what do we do abou I it?" I think there is 
something that all of you as high school principals , school 
superintendents, athletic directors, all of you are in connec- 
tion in one way or another with high school men particularly 
because I feel more comfortable talking about them, I don't 
know quite how we solve the problem with the girls, but I 
have the feeling that if we solve it with the young men, we 
might go a long way toward solving it with everyone. I think 
we have overlooked the importance of organized athletics in 
the solution of the problems that I have set forth today. 

I am afraid that we are not going to get American parents 
to change. Our society has created affluence beyond our wild- 
est dreams. I think all of you can remember along with me, 
as we were growing up in the 1930's and 20's we used to 
read Popular Mechanics, Popular Science and see all those 
wonderful gadgets and we thought that if we somehow could 
get all those gadgets for ourselves that we'd be happy and we 
know that's not true, but that affluence is with us and we 
have gotten use to two or three cars and air conditioning, 
and two or three television sets, and long vacations, and lots 
of leisure time, and all these things are with us. We reap a 
very unfortunate harvest from such affluence but it cannot 
be this. I am not one who doesn't believe the clock can be 
turned back. The clock can be turned back on a good many 
things and it better be or there isn't going to be a United 
States very much longer. But on this one, I don't think we 
can turn the clock back. Affluence is with us, and for most 
of the young men that you are dealing with in high school 
today, even though they would say, "Well, I come from mid- 
dle class parents, lower middle class, my father is a working 
man or something," still in terms of gadgets or comforts at 
home he has, and his parents go out in the evening a lot- 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH 1970 



ours didn't, they stayed home all the time. I remember my 
mother saying you can't have children and have anything 
else, you have to stay home with them, we don't, you don't 
no one does now. 

All these things produce problems for you people, but 
where young men can be brought in to organized athletics 
and brought into it strongly so that they are picked up with 
it and see it themselves, I believe a great deal can be done to 
overcome the lack of discipline, the lack of standards and 
the lack of competition that are at the root of the trouble of 
this Country today. There is nothing I can say to you people 
about athletics that's possibly new at all, but perhaps this 
application of organized athletics conscientiously, to produce 
better standards of discipline and competition is something 
you can work on in your individual high schools. 

I would like to talk if 1 can very briefly about our pro- 
gram at Annaplois because I think that it is one of the rea- 
sons, and I suppose I should knock on wood because it may 
be going on this morning back there, but I believe that our 
very strong occupation with athletics at Annapolis and West 
Point and Colorado Springs, has been one of the reasons why 
we have been free of the sort of disturbances that have pla- 
gued so many of the campuses. 

Now I know that many of you will smile and say, "Ah 
come on now, Admiral, you know you're going to put them 
all in a brig if they give you any trouble." That's not really 
true and those of you that know what goes on in detail at the 
three service academies realize that that isn't really a work- 
able program. The government of the student body has long 
been I'm speaking now of West Point and Annapolis, in the 
hands of the senior class. The officers of the brigade, the 
seniors, really do run it; we really do let them make the fun- 
damental decisions as to discipline, schedule, time and so 
forth. Every once in a while, they curl my hair with the decis- 
ions they make but it has been our practice and it will con- 
tinue to be, I'm sure to let the senior class run it. They are 
the ones who must run the discipline and organization at the 
academies if we are to achieve what we hope to achieve in 
our programs. If they wanted to, or if the under-classes want- 
ed to, in the twinkling of an eye, they could overthrow what 
appears to be a very well ordered and very well disciplined 
system. There is no police force, there are no Marines, there 
is really no workable means of applying force to the student 
bodies at these three academies. I do think, though, corning 
back to our programs there, that the three part program at 
these academies is very important in understanding what goes 
on at them. Of course, there is an academic program, and 
there is and perhaps uniquely, a very strong moral program. 
We believe that our instruction in leadership in the moral 
responsibilities of leadership is one of the most important 
parts of what we have. But the athletic program is all en- 
compassing and I think most valuable in achieving the stand- 
ards, the discipline and the competition that are missing in 
so much American high school and college society today. 

Every one of our 4,200 midshipmen compete in intra- 
mural athletics. This is required in all three seasons. We have 
23 different sports in the intramural program. We have com- 
plete equipment for all of them including the touch football 
program, I mean the tackle football program. The overall 
budget for our total athletic program at the Naval Academy 
is 1.35 million donars per year, none of which is obtained 
from appropriated funds. This is all a privately financed pro- 
gram, the great majority of the money coming from football 
receipts. Basketball and wrestling makes a small contribution, 
and over the years, the Naval Academy Athletic Association 
has invested its money well and does have some endowment 
income which helps to support this program. The tax payers 
of the United States do not contribute either to the inter- 
collegiate or the intramural program. I suppose when we talk 
about Naval Academy athletics, you can't help asking me, 
"Admiral, what has happened to Naval Academy football," 
and I could go on at some length about that. A lot of people 
ask me why we can't play an easier schedule. I think a lot of 
you are deeply enough involved in football scheduling to 
know what schedule I am working on right now but our ath- 



letic director, Captain Coppedge, an<* I are going over the 
1978-79 schedules. Everything is locked in until then and so 
it does no good for me to talk about making easier schedules 
for Naval Academy football. Nor would 1, if! could, because 
I think we must compete with the strongest and most able 
colleges in the country and on a regional basis so that we 
play teams from the West, Southwest, South and so on. 

This year, we will be playing at Austin, Texas, with the 
University of Texas, and at Miami with the University of 
Miami in Florida. I know full well we are going to be out- 
classed in both games, it's just inevitable but we are going to 
compete and do the very best we can. A lot of people wonder 
why we don't stop playing Notre Dame. One of the answers, 
of course, is in that 1.35 million dollar budget 

I am sure that many of you know what it costs to run a 
crew program, but no one comes to watch those boys row ex- 
cept their mothers, as far as I can determine, and yet it costs 
us about $50,000 a year to maintain the Navy Crew. 

So this is where the money goes and, of course, if it 
weren't for Army-Navy in Philadelphia in early December, 
and if it weren't for Notre Dame-Navy, we simply couldn't 
have the kind of athletic program we have now. Those are 
facts of life which I have to deal with the same as many of 
you must deal. But I love the competition of Notre Dame. I 
like Rick Frazino's story of a few years ago when we were a 
little more competitive— the score was 21-21 (I think this 
was about 60 or 61) with only about a minute to go. They 
brought the ball about down to our 35 yardline where we 
held for a fourth and seven. We thought we had them because 
we knew their place kicker pretty well and we just didn't think 
he could kick one from that far back. But sure enough, they 
sent in a place kicker but it was a new boy we had never seen 
before in a fresh uniform and this looked bad to us. Our 
hearts kind of sank but Rick said when they got lined up and 
he saw the referee cross himself, he knew we were really in 
trouble. 

Rick Frazino, our new football coach, has a big job cut 
out for him and that goes I suppose without saying. If you 
stop and think what it means to recruit these days for an 
academic program that I think is as tough as any in any of the 
Ivy League schools in an affluent society where the fact that 
the tuition is free, doesn't really matter as much as it used to 
and where there is a five year requirement after graduation 
for service in the Navy or Marine Corps as an officer, you can 
see some of our problems. 

There are, I believe, 26 professional football teams now 
and they really take in 250 to 300 boys a year, at the most, 
but every really fine young high school football player sees 
himself in that group and he hates to go to a school where he 
knows he can't compete for five years afterward. However, I 
believe we can do it; I believe \wiy much in Rick Frazino. 
You know, Rick is a Presbyterian but with a name like that 
it is a big help to him because when he gets up there in Pen- 
nsylvania talking to the parents of a boy named Mongano, 
who is 612" and runs 100 yards in 9.5, he doesn't tell them 
any different. 

In our regular intercollegiate program, we compete in 21 
different sports. We compete in practically every major inter- 
collegiate sport except ice hockey. And taking a look at that 
one these days, I don't think I want to be in the ice hockey 
business— that is a rough business. We have 47 paid coaches; 
most of these are paid by the NAAA-Naval Academy Ath- 
letic Association, which is a nongovernment private organiza- 
tion that runs Naval Academy athletics but some of them are 
paid by the government as physical education instructors at 
Annapolis and then they double as coaches. This is true es- 
pecially in some of the minor sports. We have 40 officers 
who are qualified in one way or another, who act as assistant 
coaches, and so we have a total of 87 people actively involved 
in coaching at the Academy. A very sizable staff. We are par- 
ticularly proud of the percentage of the student body that 
participates in intercollegiate sports of some kind and I in- 
clude freshman sports here. Thirty-eight percent of the stu- 
dent body this last year was involved in intercollegiate sports 
to the degree that they at least sat on the training table and 
made some of the trips with the team. A third of the whole 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH 1970 



Page Eleven 



KHSAA AREA BASEBALL REPRESENTATIVES 




Pictured above are eighteen baseball area representatives who are currently assisting the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association in conducting the 1970 clinics for officials and coaches. They are: (Left to Right) 
Front Row- James Johnson, Frankfort; "Bunny" Davis, Danville; Eldridge Rogers, Hopkinsville; Carroll Elliott, 
Elizabethtown ; James Mooneyhan, Franklin; James Kidwell, Covington. Second Row- Don Hardin, Morehead; 
Kenneth Ashley, Science Hill; Jerry Kimmel, Beechmont; Curtis Gaines, Henderson; Al Giordano. Princeton: 
Roy Cline, Louisville. Third Row- Bill Ring, Lexington; Shelby Winfrey, CampbeUsville; Richard Morgan, Lon- 
don; Eddie Eyl, Louisville; Robert Daniels, Van Lear; W. P. Russell, Murray. (Area Representatives CletusHubbs, 
Hopkinsville, and Dale Griffith, Ashland, were not present.) 



student body received some sort of athletic award I think 
our standards of giving letters are high. To win the Varsity N, 
the boy in most of the sports must participate in 75 percent 
of the scheduled games or meets. And for track and swimming 
and so on, there are standards that he must maintain in ac- 
tually putting points on the board. We give an award called 
NA, which is a lessor award for significant assistance to the 
varsity team and most of these boys have played in a third 
or more of the games, and then we give numerals for those 
who have been out all year, tried hard, and at least made the 
training table. And, as I say, about a third of the student 
body wins some kind of an award. 

We are proud of our won-lost record at Annapolis by and 
large although I wish it were better. Over the last 10 years, 
we have won in varsity competition 1,346 meets or games 
and lost 615 for an overall average of 67%. Our best year, 
during that period, was 71% wins and our worst year, which 
was the one just completed, was 62%. By and large, I think 
this is about where the service academy should be and I do 
believe we are relatively representative in all sports except 
football. With a 2 and 8 record, we are clearly in deep trouble 
and if you think Naval Academy alumni don't care about the 
football team, you should read some of my mail. When peo- 
ple ask me how long I am going to be at the Naval Academy 
as superintendent, I say the normal tour is three years but if 
we don't win more football games this fall, I think 111 be 
departing about Christmas. 

You may ask why the emphasis on athletics at the Naval 
Academy. I have tried to answer that a little bit but I would 
like to philosophize with you just a moment on the need 
that officers be both thinkers and doers. I have talked here 
this morning about five years of obligated service but I do 
want to remind you that statistically from 75 to 80 pereent 



of the young men who graduate frojt Annapolis stay with 
the Navy or the Marine Corps at least 12 years. Which I 
think, speaking from your point of view as tax payers, gives 
you a fme return on their education. So we are talking about 
a group of young men who, by and large, do remain on as ca- 
ieer officers. They do need to be both thinkers and doers. 
They need to have a good education but above all, they need 
to know what it means to take a small ship someplace and do 
something with it, to be responsible for it in the terms of ac- 
tion, to lead young men who do not themselves have a com- 
plex and complete education, but to lead them in a way that 
makes them want to come along whether it's a Marine pla- 
toon, a small ship, a submarine, a group in an aircraft squad- 
ron, or whatever it is, that leadership is really what we are 
trying to produce and we have seen it over, and over, and 
over again, come from young men who have had athletic ex- 
perience than without it. 

I think most of you know about our Blue and Gold Pro- 
gram, but if you don't, I wish you would get in touch with 
the reserve officer on inactive duty in your area who has the 
information on the Naval Academy. I think, particularly in 
this time in the history of our country, the service academies 
are significant. As I told some of you at breakfast this morn- 
ing, the number of young men who applied for the class this 
summer was somewhere between 20,000 and 24,000. It is 
difficult for us to get the exact figures because they apply to 
the congressmen. We had 6,135 nominated which is the high- 
est number we have had in five years and we took in a class 
of some 1,300 on the 30th of June. They have been there 
going on two weeks. 

1 don't think it is true that interest in the academies is 
waning. I think some of the uproar on the college campuses 
will help ratter than hinder. But if you do know young men 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH 1970 



In Stock for 
Immediate Delivery 

First-aid Supplies 



A.B.A. Cold Tablets 

Adhesive Tape 

Alcohol 

Am Caps 

Analgestic Liniment 

Ankle Brace 

Ankle Weights 

Ankle Wraps 

Aspirin 

Athletic Liniment 

Athletic Soap 

Ath-O-Gesic 

Atomic Balm 

Atomic Rub-Down 

Band Aid 

Batter's Rosin 

Bike Tape 

Black Magic 

Body Powder 

Butterfly Tablets 

Carbonate Stick 

Cotton 

Cotton Applicators 

Cramergesic 

Dextrotabs 

Dial A Tab 



Dry Smelling Salt 

Elastic Wraps 

Elbow Pads 

Felt 

Firm Grip 

First Aid Kits 

Foam Rubber 

Foot Ointment 

Foot Powder 

Foot Solution 

Fung-o -spray 

Gauze 

Glare Guard 

Instant Ice 

Iso-Quin 

J & J Cream 

J & J Tape 

Kleen Ball 

Knee Braces 

Knee Pads 

Tape 

Tape Remover 

Tongue Depressors 

Towels 

Training Kits 

Tuf-Skin 

Vitamins 



The Sport Shop 



Phone 502 651 5143 




969 70 school catalogue 



in your area that you think can work a program like ours, a 
physical fitness, a certain degree of simply being an extrovert, 
simply a part of liking to work with other people and being 
gregarious and, of course, board scores in the 600's, please 
send him our way. We would like to see them and we think 
it will do them good and do the country good. 

In closing, I would like to repeat, though, that those of 
you that are directly or indirectly involved in athletics, I hope 
you believe in what you are doing and you don't loose faith 
in it. It isn't something that is anachronism as so many young 
people would have us believe. It is not, it is absolutely as ger- 
mane and pertinent as anything that is being done in the high 
school or college area today. You know and I know that 
young men that are involved in athletics are rarely among 
the deep trouble makers in either high school or college ac- 
tivities. This isn't just because they are too preoccupied or 
anything else, it is because I think they understand a little 
more of what is meant by discipline, by standards, and by 
competition. They are not afraid of competition. They are 
not asking or demanding that something be given to them. 
They are willing to go out and compete for it and win it for 
themselves, which is the American way, the way that has 
made the country work in the past and that must make it 
work in the future. 

Whenever I give a talk like this, I often give it for Mrs. 
Calvert first and I gave this for her just a little while ago. She 
said it was fine but she has a copy of the New York Times 
with her and she said, "Let me read you this, though." It was 
an ad for an apartment combination washer-dryer. It said 
that it was fully automatic, had its own source of hot air, 
spun itself dry and shut itself off automatically in 40 minutes, 
and I recommend that you do the same and I'm going to do it 

Thank you very much. 



Basketball By The Rules 

The production of a new motion picture entitled BAS- 
KETBALL BY THE RULES is announced by the National 
Federation of State High School Athletic Associations. The 
film is the latest addition to the Official Sports Films, Inc. 
library of official rules films and is scheduled for release on 
July 1, 1970. Prints will be distributed through the various 
State High School Associations as well as film libraries 
throughout the United States and Canada. 

BASKETBALL BY THE RULES is produced under the 
sanction and supervision of National Federation fo State High 
School Athletic Associations and allied groups. It is the 29th 
picture in the series of official rules films and the 11th bas- 
ketball movie. The film is made possible through the sponsor- 
ship of Wilson Sporting Goods Company and Desenex Foot- 
Care Products. 

Scenes for BASKETBALL BY THE RULES will be filmed 
during the week of March 29, 1970 at Quincy, Illinois. Play- 
ing personnel will be chosen from the Quincy Senior High 
School and will be under the direction of coach Sherill Hanks. 
To assure the authenticity of the play situations to be filmed, 
the National Federation has selected a technical staff made 
up of representatives of the National Basketball Committee 
of the United States and Canada as well as other rules ex- 
perts of national prominence. Outstanding officials from Iowa 
and Wisconsin will also be participating in the filming. 

BASKETBALL BY THE RULES will penetrate beneath 
the surface of the game to provide a thorough examination 
of the playing rules and officiating procedures. It is intended 
to present guidelines that will aid the fans as well as the of- 
ficials, coaches and players in a better understanding of those 
difficult judgment decisions that are constantly occurring in 
this action-packed game of basketball, America's favorite win- 
ter sport. 



In Choosing An Insurance 

Program, Service And 

Benefits Should Always 

Be Considered First. 

Our Customers Have Found 

That They Get Full Value 

For Their Premium Dollar. 

Do You? 



< 7!4e KMujden Company 



GENERAL AGENT 



W. E. KINGSLEY J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. CHARLES C. PRICE 

Life Department 

121-123 LAFAYETTE AVE 

P.O. BOX 7100 LEXINGTON, KY. 40502 PHONE 254-4095 









We Smp-TJie DaYYou BuY' 



HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO., INC. 

PHONE CH 7-1941 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 



IT'S PLAY TIME 



Outdoor playground programs will be conducted in many schools during 

summer months. 

Our stock is complete on all types of playground and play time equipment. 

Try our "WE SHIP THE DAY YOU BUY" service on: 
Basketballs 

Basketball goals 
Volley balls 

Volleyball nets and posts 
Playground balls of all sizes 
Softballs and Softball bats 

Badminton racquets and shuttlecocks 
Nets and complete badminton sets 

Regulation horseshoes in steel and rubber 
Shuffleboard sets and supplies 
Tennis racquets, nets and balls 

If you plan to have baseball or softball in connection with your recreation 
program, we have a complete stock of uniforms, shoes, bats, balls and 
gloves in Little League, Babe Ruth League and regulation sizes. 

Please write or call for complete information and prizes, and our sales- 
men will be glad to call or give you any information and assistance you 
may need. 

Our salesmen have been out since January 1st with the 1970 Football 
and Basketball samples. Our complete line of Spanjian, Rawlings, Mac- 
Gregor, Seco, Wilson and many accessory lines are sure to contain your com- 
plete requirements for a successful Fall and Winter Season. Let us help you. 

HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO., INC. 



Phone: Bardstown, Ky. Mayfield, Ky. Paducah, Ky. 



348-9679 247-1941 

Dick Stone Roy Boyd, Jim Mitchell 

Phil Carrico, C.A. Byrn, Jr. 



443-3012 
Eddie Thomis 



M<0*0 Ji 0M\0 





Hiqh School Athlete 



MALE HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL TEAM 
K.H.S.A.A. CHAMPION-1970 




(Left to Right) Kneeling in Front: Mgr. Mattingly, Bill Gordon, Darryl Stobaugh, Bill Bacon, 
Harold Snow, Charles Duncan, Ronald Butler. Second Row: Coach Jim Huter, Henry Huskey , Clarence 
Childers, Lawrence Haralson, Bill Bunton, Ed Love, Robert Shackelford, Ass't Coach Charley Roberts. 

District Tournament Games Won Regional Tournament Games Won 

Male 73-53 Manual Male 61-49 Eastern 

Male 64-58 St. Xavier Male 71-52 Atherton 

Male 93-64 St. Xavier 

Official Organ of the 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

APRIL, 1970 



MADISON - RUNNER-UP 
1970 STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 



^ .SB^^MMI^^H 




' © 


■ n 


ft^r 




A> 


■ ^% ^> 




vX-mI^. ^^wi 


jh -J 4 El 




1 54 1 

■ AJGM ■ 


14 4 ■ I 40/1 

1 ™"^fcl nlG " M 


'kubwihI 

[sea 


l 2e A 

^UlIGH IB 


t'. , • IB ^B 










njjtfV...' "v - * 












■ 'flDISO* 


Hb. '! 


n'p Alwl 


^isoz/iPi 












« itf it*-' 


p3l 







(Left to Right) Front Row: Mgr. Bale Griggs, Ed Freeman, Frank Parks, Reggie Camp, Frank Turner, Randy 
•Black, Second Row: Coach Ray Vencill, Dwight Douglas, Alex Embry, Howard Miller, Bob Brooks, Jim Curry, 
Tim Harris, Donnie Catching, Charles Sweatt, Asst. Coach Jess Ward. 



PLEASURE RIDGE PARK - SEMI-FINALIST 
1970 STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Steve Parks, Ricky Carter, David Slayton, Randy Waddell, Carl Stamps, Carey 
Bonds, Mike Patrick, Nick Diachenko. Second Row: Asst. Coach Bill Waddell, Asst. Coach Melvin Green, Ronnie 
Embry, Kenny Eckhardt, Kevin Kok, Steve Davis, Steve Dennison, Coach Gary Schaffer. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXXII-NO. 9 



APRIL, 1970 



$1.00 Per Year 



The Indestructible Sport 

By Max Rafferty, Superintendent 
California State Department of Education 

National Federation Annual Meeting 

Football. 

It's the only pastime known to man in which just about 
as many people line up to knock it as line up to patronize it 
It's the oldest team game there is, and for more than 2,000 
years all sorts of sages, pundits, and self-styled experts have 
been reviling, abusing, taunting, excoriating, denouncing, stig- 
matizing, and accusing it of everything from mild mayhem 
to mass murder. 

The old Greeks and Romans played it under the name 
"harpastum," : and Caesar Augustus criticized it because it 
tooK his legionaries away from military drill too often. 

Medieval Italians played a kind of football they called 
"calcio," and the Church authorities frowned on it because 
it was sometimes played on Sundays. 

The game was popular in Merrie England under the Plant- 
agenets, and in fact made everybody merry except the Plant- 
agenets themselves. Both Edward II and Henry VI outlawed 
the sport because it tended to interfere with archery practice. 

American colonists were playing football in Jamestown as 
early as 1609, a date when there were hardly enough colon- 
ists to choose up two teams. And true to form, the colonial 
governors took a dim view of the ancient sport 

Around 1905, Theodore Roosevelt almost had to blow 
the whistle on football, although he was personally an ar- 
dent fan. Such lethal innovations as the flying wedge and 
mass blocking were threatening to kill off the game by killing 
off the unfortunate participants who happened to get caught 
in the meat-grinder. 

"I want to learn how to make football a less homicidal 
pastime," quoth Teddy with admirable restraint "I don't 
wish to speak as a mere sentimentalist, but I don't think that 
killing should be a normal accompaniment of the game." 

But somehow football has always managed to survive. 
Today, far more than baseball-a relatively recent innovation 
in the world of athletic competition— football is America's 

Number One team sport. It's played by tens of thousands and 
enjoyed by tens of millions. 

What is there about this primeval pastime which so en- 
thuses its friends, infuriates its enemies, and yet mesmeriaes 
both? 

Well, for one thing, it's predictable in a sense that soccer 
is definitely not. While it's perfectly true that a football 
takes funny bounces, it's just as true that superior strategy 
properly executed by players who are equal to their op- 
ponents in ability will produce superior results. This aspect 
of the game appeals strongly to the intellectual sports fan- 
the same sort of fellow who goes in for chess. 

His opposite number, of course, is the less cerebral and 
more adrenal devotee of brute force and rousingly gung-ho 
bodily contact. The twang of outraged ligaments, the crunch 
of a good hard tackle, the mournful whistle of some 250- 
pounder as the air is knocked out of him on a downfield 
block-these are music to the ears of our occasional Nean- 
derthal types. Only football provides them, par excellence. 

Then there's that indefinable thing called "color" which 



has always been an inseparable part of the game. Compared 
to football, baseball is about as colorful as a treasurer's report. 
So, incidentally, are track, la crosse, tennis, field hockey, and 
what have you. In no other sports does the crowd in the 
stands share so fully in the agony and the ectsasy of the play- 
ers, or sweep them along to victory or defeat on the strength 
of spectator enthusiasm. The marching bands, the cheer lead- 
ers, the card stunts, and all the rest are unique to football, and 
go far toward making it the most popular as well as the most 
colorful of sports. 

But the greatest attraction which the game holds for the 
average man is its essentially military nature. We humans are 
war lovers. We always have been, ever since we crawled out 
of caves. Small boys are drawn instinctively to popguns and 
lead soldiers. Girls gravitate as though by magnetism to any 
male in the crowd who wears a uniform. All of us love a 
parade, because war exerts a fatal and profound fascination 
for our species. 

Well, football is war without killing. With football, we 
can have our military cake and eat it too. A fast, shifty half- 
back executes a flanking maneuver every time he sets out on 
an end run. A quarterback sneak is a surprise attack. A huddle 
is a council of war. Any forward pass is aerial warfare in 
miniature. Time out is an armed truce. The goal line is an 
enemy objective. And anyone who has ever watched a 200- 
pound fullback bulldoze a line for five yards with a sawed- 
off, five-by-five guard running interference for him knows 
without any further demonstration exactly what tank war- 
fare is like. 

Given this universal appeal of what is certainly a universal 
game, how does one explain the almost fanatical opposition 
to it? 

Part of it comes from college professors, and always as. 
Legend has it that President Eliot of Harvard once turned 
down a bid to send a championship team west to play Michi- 
gan with the classic statement: 

"I refuse to send eleven of our young men one thousand 
miles merely to agitate a bag of wind." 

More recently it was Robert Hutchins of Chicago, who 
abolished football at that great institution with considerable 
fanfare, declaiming piously the while that he was doing it to 
benefit other more desirable and less professionalized sports. 
This was some years back. Right now, I'd like to see the hand 
of anyone who has ever heard of any University of Chicago 
sport since then- from mumbletypeg to bowling-on-the-green. 

But the most formidable enemies of the grand old game 
are not the professors any more. After all, they've been a- 
round for years. No, it's the "new breed" of so-called stu- 
dent "activists" - the "Let's-Donate-Blood-to-the-Commun- 
ists" agitators - the hairy, loud-mouthed beatniks of both 
sexes who infest our college campuses today like so many 
unbathed boll weevils. Oddly enough for people so extremely 
vulnerable to ridicule themselves, they have elected to attack 
college football by ridiculing it, as indeed they ridicule all 
human activities involving anything more physical than wav- 
ing placards and swallowing LSD. 

And in so doing, they have created a myth- a kind of car- 
toon caricature which I'd like to analyze briefly, here and 
now. 

The stereotype is that of the muscle-bound and moronic 
football player. Of late he has receipted for so many "avant 
garde" jokes that he has become a permanent cliche, like the 
college widow and the absent-minded professor. 
(Continued on Page Nine) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1970 



VOL XXXII-NO. 9 



APRIL, 1970 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 40501 

Second class postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Ralph C. Dorsey (1966-70), Horse Cave 

Vice-President . . . Foster J. Sanders (1966-70), Louisville 
Diiectors-MortonCombs(1968-72), Cair Creek; W. H. Crow- 
dus (1968-71), Franklin; Don Davis (1967-71), Independ- 
ence; James T. Dotson (1968-72), Pikeville, Lee T. Mills 
(1969-73), Frankfort; Richard Vincent (1969-73). Morgan- 
fi eld - Subscription Rate $1.00 per Year 



ZTiom the Ct 



ommissionei 



's Offi 



ice 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1969-70 Basketball Participation 
List (Eligibility) 

2. School's Report on Basketball Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Basketball) 



Minutes of Board Meeting 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky High School Ath- 
letic Association met at the Kentucky Hotel, Louisville, on 
Thursday morning, March 19, 1970. The meeting was called 
to order by President Ralph C. Dorsey at 9:00, with all 
Board members and Commissioner Theo. A. Sanford present. 
The invocation was given by Foster J. Sanders. 

W. H. Crowdus moved, seconded by Don Davis, that the 
reading of the minutes of the January and February Board 
meetings be waived since the members of the Board had re- 
ceived copies of these minutes. The motion was carried un- 
animously. 

The Commissioner reported the results of the recent bal- 
loting for Board membership for Sections 3 and 4. Prin. J. C. 
Cantrell of the Valley High School was elected to Board mem- 
bership to represent Section 3 with no opposition, and Supt. 
Roy L. Winchester of the Henry County Schools was elected 
to Board membership to represent Section 4 with no op- 
position. 

Chairman Foster J. Sanders of the Retirement Committee 
presented to the Board a retirement contract for the Com- 
missioner, which had been drawn by the Association's attor- 
ney, Mr. Calvert T. Roszell. After discussion of the contract 
and proposed contracts to be given to certain other employees 
of the Association, James T. Dotson moved, seconded by 
Tom Mills, that the Commissioner be authorized to have the 
Association's attorney finalize the contract as presented, with 
certain suggested amendments, to be executed by the Com- 
missioner and the Board of Control at the April meeting of 
the Board; that the attorney be authorized to prepare for 
study a similar type of contract for Assistant Commissioner 
J. B. Mansfield, to be executed at the June meeting of the 
Board; and that the Commissioner be prepared to present 
recommendations at a subsequent meeting of the Board con- 
cerning other employees of the Association. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

There was a discussion of new proposals to be submitted 
by the Board at the forthcoming 1970 Delegate Assembly. 
Don Davis moved, seconded by Richard Vincent, that the 
following proposals be submitted to the Assembly: 

"Proposal 1 - Add to the first sentence of K.H.S.A.A. By- 
Law 3 the following: 'or then equivalent in units of credit 
accepted for graduation.' 



"Proposal II - Amend K.H.S.A.A. By-Law 5-4 to read as 
follows: To be eligible during any semester, a student must 
have been enrolled in school during the immediately pre- 
ceding semester, must have been in attendance at least three 
school months, and must have passed for that semester in at 
least three full-credit high school studies or their equivalent 
in units of credit accepted for graduation; or in three-fourths 
of the grade school studies, etc' 

"Proposal III - Amend Article VII of the K.H.S.A.A. Con- 
stitution by substituting 'September 1' for 'October 1' in the 
first sentence, other sentences in the article to be amended 
accordingly." 

The motion concerning the proposals was carried unani- 
mously. 

The Commissioner stated that the Board should make its 
decision at this time concerning the dates of the 1971 State 
Basketball Tournament. The Commissioner was directed to 
make the plans for the 1971 State Basketball Tournament to 
be held during the third week in March, as provided in Basket- 
ball Tournament Rule 1. 

James T. Dotson moved, seconded by Morton Combs, that 
all bills of the Association for the period beginning January 1, 
1970, and ending February 28, 1970, be allowed. The motion 
was carried unanimously. 

There being no further business, the meeting adjourned. 



Sanctioning Interstate Events 

THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE of the National Feder- 
ation, at its meeting in Las Vegas, Nevada on July 6, 1969, 
adopted revised procedures to be followed for applying for 
a sanction of interstate events. This was necessitated by the 
increasing munber of sanction requests received each year. 

THE REVISED PROCEDURES are streamlined to reduce 
the amount of paper work at both the state and national 
levels. There will be no relaxation of standards in the sanc- 
tioning program. 

THE HOST SCHOOL for any interstate event shall init- 
ate the application not later than thirty ( 30) days prior to 
the event. Applications which are initiated less than thirty 
days before the event will not be accepted. A single copy of 
the application form is to be executed by the host school 
and forwarded to the executive officer of the state in which 
the meet is to be held. 

IN APPLYING FOR APPROVAL of any interstate event 
through the National Federation, the host state shall: 

1. Review the application from the host school, and if it 
meets state standards, sign it and forward it to the National 
Federation office. 

2. Complete and forward forms for endorsement purposes 
to the executive officers of each state association from which 
schools will be invited to participate. 

3. States from which schools are invited, upon receiving 
endorsement forms, will indicate their action (approval or 
denial), sign, and forward the form to the National Federa- 
tion. 

4. Each state association is then responsible for notifying 
its concerned member schools of National Federation action. 

THE NATIONAL FEDERATION will act on the basis of 
the recommendations received from the various state execu- 
tive officers and will formally notify the host school's state 
association of the action. Machine copies of the completed 
application for sanction will serve as notification and will be 
forwarded to the offices of each state association from which 
schools have been invited to participate. 

APPLICATION FOR SANCTION to the National Feder- 
ation commits a host school to conduct the interstate com- 
petition in compliance with conditions which have been a- 
dopted by the constituency of the National Federation. If 
any of these provisions are lacking, the sanction is void. The 
contest conditions are: (a) each school guarantees it is a mem- 
ber in good standing of its own state high school association 
and also guarantees that participation in this contest will not 
violate any standard of that state association or the National 
Federation; (b) each contestant will be eligible under the 
standards of his home state association; (c) awards will be 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1970 



Page Three 



limited to those which are permitted by the most restrictive 
state high school association from which the competitors 
enter; (d) if a school fails to fulfill his contract obligation, 
that school will be required to make amends in accordance 
with terms fixed by the National Federation Executive Com- 
mittee after consultation of executive officers of the states 
involved; and (e) no entry will be accepted for any com- 
petitor from any state or section of a state not included in 
the list for which approval is granted. 

THE FRIENDS AND NEIGHBORS POLICY provides that 
schools not eligible for membership in their home state as- 
sociation may tie approved for participation in a National Fed- 
eration sanctioned meet provided: (1) non-member partici- 
pants adhere to standards as high or higher than the inter- 
scholastic association of their state: (2) the policies of the 
state associations represented in the meet prevail for all in- 
stitutions 'which are represented; (3) the state associations 
which are represented in a National Federation sanctioned 
meet unanimously agree to the participation of schools which 
do not have state association membership because they can- 
not qualify. Non-member schools in an increasing number 
have shown a desire to participate in intra and interstate meets 
which involve state association member schools. When it can 
be shown that the non-affiliated schools maintain similar 
standards to that state's member schools and that the com- 
petition will be conducted in accordance with the require- 
ments of all states, requests for sanctions may be honored. 
The same procedures will be followed for requesting sanction 
under the Friends and Neighbors Policy. 



Baseball Area Leaders 



K.H.S.A.A.-trained area representatives in baseball, who 
are currently conducting clinics for coaches and officials and 
who are assisting with registration of new officials, are ren- 
dering a fine service to the Association. The names and ad- 
dress of these men, with the residence and business phone 
numbers (residence numbers given fust), are as follows: 

W. P. Russeil, 1112 Elm Street, Murray, 753-8722, 752-5125 
Cletus Hubbs, 260 Old Orchard Road, Paducah, 442-8978, 

443-5177 
Eldridge Rogers, 310 Talbert, HopkinsviUe, 885-5571, 886- 

3921 
A! Giordano, 107 Ratliff, Princeton, 365-5680, 365-5615 
Curtis Gaines, 1514 Young Street, Henderson, 826-9933, 

827-3537 
Jerry Kimmel, Beechmont, 476-2656, 476-8375 
James H. Mooneyhan, Franklin, 586-4989, 586-4451 
Carroll EUiott, 307 College Street, Elizabethtown, 765-4007, 

765-6118 
Shelby Winfrey, 315 Sharon Drive, Campbellsville, 465-8392, 

465-8392 
Ed Eyl, 2252 Bradford Dr., Louisville, 452-1001 
Roy Cline, 1194 Lincoln, Louisville, 637-8249, 774-7632 
Bill Ring, 481 Rookwood Pky., Lexington, 299-7089, 255- 

8492 
Jim Johnson, 174 Pinehurst Drive, Frankfort, 223-2822, 875- 

1535 
Bunny Davis, 598 W. Lexington, Danville, 236-3002, 236- 

2606 
Kenneth Ashley, Science Hill, 423-3215, 679-4942 
Richard Morgan, Route 6, Box 64, London, 864-6511, 864- 

5114 
James Kidwell, 1112 Parkway, Covington, 291-6856, 581- 

9141 
Buddy Roe, Isom. 633-2973.633-2961 
Robert Daniels, Box 2, Van Lear, 789-3931, 789-4932 
Don Hardin, P. O. Box 88, Morehead, 784-7698, 784-7696 
Dale Griffith, 2714 Lorraine St., Ashland, 324-2497, 325- 

8511 



Newly Elected Board Members 




J. C. Cantrell 



Roy L. Winchester 



Prin. J. C. Cantrell of the Valley High School and Supt. 
Roy L. Winchester of the Henry County Schools will repre- 
sent Sections 3 and 4 respectively on the Board of Control 
for a four-year period, beginning July 1, 1970. 

J. C. Cantrell was born in Smithville, Tennessee. His par- 
ents moved to Carrollton, Kentucky, when he was three, and 
some ten years later to Bedford. He attended elementary 
school in Carrollton, high school in Bedford, and received 
his A.B. degree from Western Kentucky State University. He 
holds the M.E. degree from the University of Louisville. 

Mr. Cantrell taught and coached at Bedford during the 
1938-42 period. In June of 1942 he was accepted in the Navy 
V-7 Program. Upon his release by the Naval Reserve in 1946, 
he was employed at the Valley High School where he served 
as teacher and basketball coach until 1952. He became the 
school's athletic director in 1952, assistant principal in 1954, 
and principal in 1956. 

The new Board member holds membership in local, state 
and national professional organizations. He has held offices in 
these organizations at the local and state levels. He is a mem- 
ber of Phi Delta Kappa. He is a member of the local Optimist 
Club, jinri is an Elder in the Vallev Christian Church. He is a 
Member of the Navy League and the NRA. 

Mr. Cantrell is married to the tormer Zula Dovle. The 
Cantrells have two sons, Joe and John. Joe, a graduate of 
Transylvania and the University of Kentucky, is employed in 
the accounting department of the Courier-Journal. John is a 
sophomore at the University of Kentucky. 

Roy L. Winchester attended high school at Gallatin Coun- 
ty and Science Hill, playing both basketball and baseball. 
graduating in 1943. He was in the U. S. Navy during the 
1943-44 period. He taught at the Junior Military Academy. 
Chicago, Illinois, in 1945-46, coaching all sports. 

Mr. Winchester was basketball coach at the Pleasurevllle 
High School for five years. He received his A.B. degree from 
Western Kentucky University in 1950, his M.A. degree from 
the University of Kentucky in 1954. Subsequently he was 
principal of the North Warren High School for two years. 

At Fern Creek High School Mr. Winchester was head bas- 
ketball coach for a period of three years. He coached golf for 
six seasons. He was on the staff of Waggener High School for 
two years, and was athletic director of the Henry County 
High School for five years. He has been superintendent of 
Henry County Schools since 1967. lor nineteen years Mr. 
Winchester has been a registered basketball official with the 
K.H.S.A.A. He has called eight state tournaments. 

Mr. Winchester is married to the former Zelma Peyton of 
Bethlehem, Kentucky. The Winchesters have four duaghtcrs. 
Their ages are 18, 15, 10, and 7. 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1970 



1970 Annual Meeting 



The business meeting of the K.H.S.A.A. will be held on 
Thursday, April 16, at 2:30 P.M., in the Crystal Ballroom of 
the Brown Hotel, Louisville. The dinner meeting will be held 
at 6:00 P.M. in the Crystal Ballroom. Dr. Harold A. Meyer, 
Commissioner of the Ohio High School Athletic Association, 
will be the principal speaker at the dinner meeting. 

As provided in Article IX, Section 1, of the K.H.S.A.A. 
Constitution, the following changes in the Constitution and 
By-Laws will be acted upon by the Delegate Assembly: 

Proposal I 

The Board of Control proposes that the following be add- 
ed to the first sentence of By-Law 3: "or their equivalent in 
units of credit accepted for graduation." 

Proposal II 

The Board of Control proposes that By-Law 5-4 be a- 
mended to read as follows: "To be eligible during any se- 
mester, a student must have been enrolled in school during 
the immediately preceding semester, must have been in at- 
tendance at least three school months, and must have passed 
for that semester in at least three full-credit high school stud- 
ies or their equivalent in units of credit accepted for gradua- 
tion; or in three-fourths of the grade school studies, etc." 

Proposal HI 

The Board of Control proposes that Article VII of the 
Constitution be amended by substituting "September 1" for 
"October 1" in the first sentence, other sentences in the ar- 
ticle to be amended accordingly." 

Proposal IV 

Prin. Thomas W. Johnson (Providence) proposes that By- 
Law 4 be amended to read as follows: "A contestant be- 
comes ineligible on his twentieth birthday." 

Proposal V 

Bro. Conrad Callahan, C.F.X., Prin. (St. Xavier) proposed 
to amend the last sentence of By-Law 8 by omitting 'swimm- 
ing" and "wrestling". 

The Growth Of Wrestling 

By Clifford B. Fagan 

The great potential interscholastic wrestling has for the 
education of boys is now universally recognized. The amaz- 
ing growth the sport has had at the interscholastic level at- 
tests to this recognition. 

Over 5900 high schools sponsored the activity during the 
1968-69 season. One hundred eighty-eight thousand boys 
took part. Wrestling has been added to more high school pro- 
grams during the last three years than any other sport. The 
interest in it has been phenomenal and, in many areas, more 
boys try out for wrestling than either for basketball or swim- 
ming. 

There are many qualities to recommend its inclusion in 
the interscholastic program. Competition is based upon 
weight classifications, thereby insuring a degree of physical 
equality. The grouping of weights ranging through 12 classes 
accommodates boys of all sizes. It is an activity which can 
be conducted in the wintertime in a minimum of space and, 
while it is advantgaeous to have individual coaching, one in- 
structor can supervise a rather large group of wrestlers. 

It is a contact sport. Educators and psychologists are em- 
phasizing the need of contact experiences for junior and sen- 
ior high school boys. These experiences definitely contribute 
to masculinity. 



There is no sport which better teaches the value of condi- 
tioning. It is one of the few truly developmental sports. The 
growing boy who goes through the rigorous training schedule 
required in preparing for and taking part in interscholastic 
wrestling, develops his physique. Wrestling is comparatively 
inexpensive and, with adequate care, the equipment for it 
lasts several seasons. 

Not the least of the qualities to recommend wrestling is 
that it is an individual sport and the wrestler, when he goes 
on the mat, must have courage and be self-reHant. Unfortun- 
ately, in some team sports, a competitor can ride alonj; on 
his teammates' efforts and he can alibi his shortcomings by 
faulting teammates or officials. In wrestling, the individual 
must depend upon himself and the officiating, while import- 
ant, certainly does not affect the outcome to the degree it 
does in some other activities of the interscholastic program. 

As is the case with any activity which has so much "going 
for it", there is a great opportunity for abuse and exploit- 
ation. 

If interscholastic wrestling is to contribute the maximum 
to the education and development of boys and to the schools 
program, it is essential that the leadership be dedicated to de- 
veloping and educating boys. Already there are too many 
signs that not all the leadership can meet the rigid demands. 

The greatest, and perhaps the most frequent, abuse ix ex- 
cessive weight reduction. A minimum of weight reduction is 
associated with attaining the proper condition, but the prac- 
tice of excessive weight reduction is harmful to the partici- 
pants health. Excessive reduction is all too common and 
wrestling leaders themselves must take the responsibility of 
eliminating this abuse if the activity is to reach its potential, 
or even maintain its present place in the program. 

State associations have already been forced to legislate for 
reasonableness in the matter of weight reduction. The sys- 
tems, which have been established to protect the health of the 
participant, cannot be made foolproof. Unfortunately they 
can be exploited by the unethical coach. Wrestling coaches 
are among the most enthusiastic in the interscholastic arena. 
Enthusiasm is good and needed, and serves to make the pro- 
gram interesting. However, it must be kept within bounds and 
directed properly. Coaches of the sport must acknowledge 
that there are reasonable limits to the sport season and 
that, even though we are undoubtedly tending to want greater 
specialization, wrestling must not consume all of a growing 
boys energy or time. A growing boy should not expose him- 
self to wrestling as a year-round activity. If leaders demand 
such dedication, it will bring increasing restrictions and un- 
necessary limitations. A course of reasonableness voluntarily 
pursued by wrestling leaders will insure greater freedom. 

The educational community appreciates the need of adeq- 
uate representation in sports internationally. International ex- 
changes of athletes have contributed greatly in recent years 
to an improved understanding between nations. However, 
responsible leadership in wrestling must acknowledge that the 
sport is not a part of the school program solely for the devel- 
opment of champions to insure strong representation inter- 
nationally. 

The schools include wrestling in the interscholastic pro- 
gram and support it for the contribution wrestling can make 
to the education of the participants and to the program of the 
school itself. If champions can be and are developed through 
a natural course in which the educational programs are neith- 
er abused nor exploited, it is a program plus. But, school 
leaders cannot and will not sponsor a program at the cost of 
a fair and equitable opportunity for all boys only for the 
purpose of developing champions. This would be a mistake. 
Leaders must accept that as a school activity, wrestling is 
subject to the same principals as other school activities. 

Responsible leadership must recognize that the interschol- 
astic wrestling program is going to have its healthiest develop- 
ment and its greatest acceptance if the sport is conducted in 
accordance with the educational principals which apply to all 
aspects of interscholastics. Wrestling must be one of the fam- 
ily if it is to realize its great potetnial. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1970 



Page Five 



Track Questions 



These interpretations of the 1970 National Alliance Track 
and Field Rules do not set aside nor modify any rule. The 
rulings are made and published by the National Federation of 
State High School Athletic Associations in response to situa- 
tions presented. -Clifford B. Pagan 

1. Situation: A school constructs a new track and because 
of space limitations it is necessary that the radii of the curved 
ends be 114 feet. Because of this adjustment, the distance 
around each curve is^ greater than the length of the straight 
sides. One of the sides has been extended so tnere is a straight- 
away of 150 yards. 

Ruling: While a standardized track is most desirable, it is 
recognized that there are sometimes factors which must limit 
the shape of a track. Even though this track does not con- 
form with the standardized facility, it may be legal. A plot 
diagram and a statement by a licensed civil engineer specify- 
ing the measurements for all starting and finishing lines, and 
for relay exchange zones, and for the placement of hurdles, 
should be readily available and will provide the information 
necessary to certify the legality of the track. 

2. Situation: During the high hurdles Kl loses his balance 
and jostles Bl. 

Ruling: Al is disqualified. Whenever a runner is hampered 
or impeded by jostling, the offender is disqualified. 

3. Situation: In the area where the running long jump 
competition is to be conducted, the takeoff board abutts the 
nearest edge of the landing pit. The landing pit is 9 feet wide 
and 27 feet long. There is no solid space between the front of 
the takeoff board and the landing pit. 

Ruling: The area is legal provided the level of material 
immediately in front of the takeoff board is such that the 
judges will be able to determine whether or not a runner 
touches over the scratch line. The requirement that the 
scratch line be approximatley 12 feet from the near edge of 
the landing pit was adopted so that it would not be necessary 
to construct extremely large landing pits. The fact that the 
area beyond the scratch line is all landing pit, while unusual, 
does not cause a facility to be illegal. The concern of the rules 
committee is that the pit extend far enough from the scratch 
line so that long jumpers do not land beyond the pit. It is 
common for those who conduct grade school and junior high 
track meets to make adjustments in the placement of the take- 
off board in relation to the landing pit. If a facility as the one 
described were available, these adjustments would not be nec- 
essary. 

4. Situation: Team A appears for an invitational meet 
with individual participants in varied uniforms: (a) High Jum- 
per Al has slit the outside leg seam of his track pants 4 to 6 
inches above the lower hem for more leg freedom; (b) A2 re- 
ports to the discus throwing circle without a shirt; (c) A3 is 
wearing a T-shirt under a sleeveless track shirt; and (d) A4 re- 
ports to the starting line for the 100-yard dash without shoes. 

Ruling: The track uniforms in (a) and (b) are not in con- 
formance with the rules. Al andA2 may not participate until 
adjustments have been made in the uniform to comply with 
the rule. In (c) the uniform worn by A3 is legal. A4 may 
compete without shoes in (d). Shoes are recommended but 
not required. 

5. Situation: Inpre-meet information, the Games Commit- 
ee has notified participating schools that competition will be 
conducted on an all-weather track and that the maximum 
length spikes which may be used is 1/4". Bl reports to the 
starting line wearing shoes which have: (a) fixed spikes 1/2" 
long; or (b) several rows of brush spikes 1/4" long. 

Ruling: In (a) Bl will not be permitted to compete un- 
less he changes to shoes which comply with the standards 
established with the meet management. A maximum of 5 
minutes should be adequate in order to make this adjustment. 
In (b) the described shoe is legal. Because all-weather track 
surfaces vary according to materials used, the Games Com- 
mittee is authorized to establish the maximum length spikes 



State Wrestling Tournament 

The 1970 State High School Wrestling Tournament was 
held at the Jeffersontown High School on February 20-21. 
The Woodford County High School, with 64 points, won the 
tournament. Ray Crooker of the Boone County High School 
was named the meet's "Most Outstanding Wrestler." The 
Fort Campbell High School was second with 55 points. 
Boone County, North Hardin, and Waggener tied for third 
place with 52 points. 

The tournament was managed by wrestling Chairman Or- 
ville Williams of the Seneca High School. It was the seventh 
tournament sponsored by the K.H.S.A.A. 

Teams which scored finsihed in this order: 1-Woodford 
County, 64; 2-Fort Campbell, 55; 3 (tie)-North Hardin, Wag- 
gener, Boone County, 52; 6-Westport, 40; 7-Flaget, 27; 8- 
Trinity, 22; 9-Danville, 21; 10-Newport Catholic, 19; 11-Fern 
Creek, 17; 12 (tie)-Eastern, Campbell County, Hopkinsville, 
16; 15-Frankfort, 14; 16 (tie)-St. Xavier, Kentucky School 
for the Blind, 11; 18 (tie)-Pleasure Ridge Park, Western, 8; 
20-Millersburg Military Institute, 6; 21 (tie)-Seneca, Valley, 
4; 23-CaIdwell County, 3; 24-Franklin Simpson, 2; 25 (tie)- 
Harrison County, Lafayette, Oldham County, 1. 

Medals were awarded to the first three places in each class. 
These winners were as follows: 

95 lb. -Bill Clarkson, Hopkinsville; Ron Hall, Waggener; 
Mike Holloway, Boone County 

107 lb.-AUan Boyd, Fort Campbell; Don Butler, Wood- 
ford County; Danny Legal, St. Xavier 

1 15 lb.-Doug Sieger, Boone County; Norman Davis, Wood- 
ford County; Richard Burden, Pleasure Ridge Park 

123 lb.-Ronnie Chapman, Fort Campbell; Joe Pusateri, 
Westport; Bill Barrows, Woodford County 

130 lb.-Nick Barker, Danville; Ronnie Hickock, North 
Hardin; Brians Lyons, Flaget 

137 lb.-Ray Russell, Eastern; Don Sundberg, Waggener; 
Stan Whittnessy, Fort Campbell 

145 lb.-Charles Roach, North Hardin; Ken Welsh, Flaget; 
Alan Martin, Western 

155 lb.-Ray Crooker, Boone County; Mike Cassity, Fort 
Campbell, Jeff Kreigg, Westport 

165 lb.-Victor Masson, Boone County; Mike Stone, New- 
port Catholic; Arthur Noonan, Waggener 

175 lb.-Hartley Wilson, Woodford County, Reni Jackson, 
Kentucky School for the Blind; John Hilb, Trinity 

185 lb.-Steve Vessles, Fern Creek; Remo Butler, Fort 
Campbell; Stan Hill, Campbell County 

Heavyweight-Larry Weathers, Woodford County; Berme 
Head, North Hardin; Ken Coin, Frankfort 

to be permitted during competition on local all-weather track 
andjunways. 

6. Situation: Review the procedure to be followed by an 
inspector who observes a running infraction. 

Ruling: When the infraction occurs, the inspector will 
wave a red flag above his head to signify the foul or irregular- 
ity. At the conclusion of the race, he shall report what he has 
seen to the head inspector who, in turn, shall report to the 
referee. After hearing all of the evidence, the referee shall 
make his decision as to whether or not the runner is to be 
disqualified. The referee is the only official authorized to dis- 
qualify a runner once the race has started. 

7. Situation: Due to a shortage of meet officials, a number 
of inspectors are called from their stations to help at the 
finish line. During the race, runner Al commits a foul on a 
turn where there is no inspector. The referee observes the ac- 
tion of A 1 and disqualifies him. 

Ruling: The referee, more than any other official, is re- 
sponsible for seeing that there is fairness in the application of 
the rules. He has wide discretionary authority and may dis- 
qualify a runner who commits an infraction he observes, but 
which is not reported to him. because of the absence of an 
inspector. (Continued on Page Ten) 



Iltasfi 



J2 . r 1 -a • JS>^ O U — C *0 

■3s 



•■a 



» ' 5 = 5 

p 5 , 



SO: 3E 

Ac«B 



J iSl5 = 



laSSilJi'S-ii- 

OS «Hoo* w H a. ul O -=. OS 



1 






H 
OS 


X 




H 
Q 


OS 


OS 

ul 


o 


CO £ 


as 

hi 


Ul 
«g 

-J o 


Q 

OS = 

"ft 


OO 

a? 


- % 




£3 g 

X.C 


E 

c 

3 

o 
H 


> 2 

X 


— c 
oo Si 

03 


Q u 
_l = 
<> 
OS 

ui 
O 


* 3 

z 
ui 

Q 




os 

> 
5 


so > 

8 


Z2 

> 
o 

as 



<D 
S 

a 

o 

H 

0) 

Id 



(D 

rd 
H 

CO 

■s 

CO 



rd 
& 

CO 



Pd 


o 


o 


m 


1- 


Os 


OS 


O 


t> 


Os 


r- 


oo 


r> 


o 


r- os 


pioj 


o 


so 


(N 




SO 


oo 


o 


sO 


oo 


SO 


O 


so 


in 


SO f- 


in 


r- 


SO 


r~ 


r> 


r^ 


m 


SO 


p» 


SO 


r^ 


SO 


in 


so in 


OIJB^ 


00 


Os 


in 


o 


o 


in 




•* 


m 


o 


r~ 


O 


- 


es « 


jnoj 


so 


in 


00 


00 


m 


OS 


so 


Ju 


Os 


in 


4 


in 


6 


00 OS 




— h 








•—i 


~^ 


~* 




^^ 


~* 


fN 


*i 


es 


f-4 ^h 


*>d 


o 


en 


c-~ 


Os 


Os 


o 


(N 


oo 


(♦> 


in 


f~ 


f» 


en 


O en 


PPM 


OS 


OS 


PH 


rs 


5 


SO 


m 


(N 


r- 


Os 


r^ 


Os 


oo 


r~ o 


en 


eS 


en 


-* 


-* 


en 


ro 


cn 


m 


en 


es 


es 


en , ^- 




en 


es 


Os 


r- 




m 


Os 


O 


(N 


o 


so 


_ 


r^ 


O Os 


oxj^a 


es 


<N 




eS 


m 


rS 




<N 


<N 


rn 


es 


es 


-h 


rs rs 


PP!d 


On 


in 


rS 


en 


Os 


o 


4 


ph 


Os 


SO 


Os 


r^i 


o 


•«• es 


in 


t~~ 


so 


so 


SO 


in 


m 


SO 


in 


r- 


SO 


r- 


so 


in r~ 


Suoq 


9 


2 2 S 


9 


9 


S S S S 


9 

es 


§ 


9 


2 § 




. 








<N 






l-vl 












, 


uinips^i 


oo 


rs 


rs 


m 

Os 


Os 


s 


S 5 
O 


m 


s6 


3 


en 
rn 


op 
00 


en 
4 


4 00 




rS 


<N 


(N 


1-1 


(N 


<N 


fN 


m 


(N 


•* 


"*■ 


en 




rs es 




(N 


so 


r- 


rs 


OS 


m 


ro 




in 


CN 


m 


en 


Tf 


't 00 










<N 








00 




rs 


es 








noqs 


6 

en 


en 
in 


00 
en 


i 


Os 
m 


Os 


^ 


SO 




so 


4 
in 


m 


in 


os 4 
es ■* 


pq 

CO 

3 


O 
Ci 

1 

C 

4> 


o 

75 

> 
o 
U 


T3 

C 

| 

< 


1 

1> 


6 
u 

« 


d 
U 

x> 

1 

00 


a 


c 

§ 


d 

u 

u 
CQ 


6 
u 

e 


■g 

o 

3 

« 


c 

IU 

6 

N 


d 
u 

■I 


^ s 
2 -g 

£ i2 


■*>a 


r» 


oo 


O 


_ 


r~ 


SO 


■* 


t»> 


rn 


r- 


en 


oo 


in 


t- so 


o 


l» 


3 


r~ 


SO 


in 


00 


o% 


so 


so 


Os 


oo 


TT 


« <yv 


inoj 


so 


r> 


in 


■* 


in 


SO 


t~ 


m 


m 


in 


SO 


m 


t)- so 


oijbh 


r~ 


-* 


so 


o 




in 


ro 


,_, 


oo 


t*- 


so 


_^ 


rs 


O so 








<N 


r» 




















P*°d 


00 


00 


in 


in 


in 


r~- 


Os 


in 


("Si 


rS 


r- 


sn 


es 


4 en 


eS 


— < 


CS 


CO 


"- 1 


fN 


— ' 


- 1 


CO 


en 


es 


"i 


es 


es es 


V>d 


r- 


■* 




m 


m 


p» 


w 


m 


Os 


<N 


es 


en 


SO 


m O 


PPU 


p^ 


rs 


en 


so 


m 


rs 


r- 


3 


rN 


Os 


SO 


Os 


oo 


en m 


Tf 


■* 


eS 


en 


m 


•* 


m 


"t 


■* 


<3- 


en 


en 


en •* 




in 


in 


in 


Os 


00 


rs 


rsi 


m 


m 


Os 


o 


rj 


r- 


t r~ 


oijb^i 


<N 


(N 




(N 


m 


m 


(N 


r<l 


m 


es 


en 


es 


rs 


es es 


PPId 


6 


OS 


in 


d> 


H 


in 


Os 


OS 


r~ 


Os 


in 


so 


6 


es d> 


so 


in 


so 


oo 


f^ 


r- 


m 


r~ 


c~ 


in 


so 


m 


r~ 


r- so 


8uoq 


S 


9 


S S 


9 


9 


§ 


9 


§ § § 


9 


§ 


9 9 












rs 


















o 






in 


r^ 


3 






so 


r~ 


t~ 


so 


SO 


r^ 


oo 


2 3 


uinipsft 


r~ 


m 


si 


JU 


so 


r> 


so 


6 


en 


_i. 


M 


en 




~* 


•"* 


(N 


^ 


m 


* H 


rj 


<N 


CN 


^ 


es 


<N 


rs 


en — 




T 


O 




in 


SO 


^ H 


so 


oo 


so 


m 


■* 


m 


r> 


■* en 




es 


(N 


00 


eS 


rs 


o-i 




r^ 


rN 


eN 


es 






— es 


woqs 


CO 

•t 




CI 


3 


OS 


00 
in 


rn 


in 


m 


i i 


4 

m 




$ 3 


g 


•d 


d 
U 








H 


c 

4) 


£ 


xi 






<d 


•6 




1 


S 


1 
n 
u 

pa 


o 

o 


O 

u 




■a 

o 

3 
T3 

eg 

Oh 


o 


00 


s 


o 




0> 


S 




i 


J3 
u 

2 


c 
5 


§8 
■c 

H 


■a 


4) 

H 


s 




§8 
•c 


■a 

s 




J3 

s 


73 73 
S 2 




— 


<s 


en 


*• 


m 


SO 


r^ 


oo 


Os 


O 


- 


r^i 


en 


4 in 



1970 State Basketball Tournament Statistics 

Total number of games included in this report: 1 5 

Average score: For Winners 69; For Losers 59; for Both Teams 128. 

Average total time from opening whistle to end of game 1 hour, 16 minutes. 

Average number of personal fouls (fouls by A plus fouls by B) 31 per game. 

Average number of times a player committed 5 personal fouls 1.1 per game. 

Total number of free throw attempts resulting from Personal Technical fouls during all games: 40.8 ; Successful 

throws: .637%. 
Total number of overtime games: 

AVERAGE NUMBER 

PERSONAL FOULS: 

(a) Involving dribbler and his guard: 7.3 per game 

(b) Times dribbler committed foul: 1.5 per game 

(c) Foul by player who screens (offense) 40 per game 

(d) Foul by player being screened (defense) 1.3 per game 

(e) Intentional foul by offense per game 

(f) Intentional foul by defense 33 per game 

(g) Times 2 free throws given unsuccessful thrower for field goal 6.4 per game 

(h) Times successful thrower for field goal received 1 free throw 1.8 per game 

BASKETBALL INTERFERENCE: 

(a) Times per game there was basket interference or goal tending: 

1. At player's own basket 07 per game 

2. At opponent's basket 47 per game 

BALL RETURNED TO BACK COURT: 

(b) Times ball was returned legally after jump at center 13 per game 

(c) Times returned ball resulted in violation 27 per game 

VIOLATIONS 

(d) 3-second lane 1.3 per game 

(e) Free throw lane 53 per game 

(f) Throw-in 47 per game 

(g) Double dribble 73 per game 

(h) Travelling 7 per game 

HELD BALL: (do not include jump balls at beginning of period) 
(i) Closely guarded player in front court holding and/or dribbling 

for 5 seconds 66 per game 

(j) All other __ 2.8 per game 

TIME-OUT: (Charged) 

(k) For purpose of conferring with official regarding correcting error 53 per game 

(1) All other 5.7 per game 

TOTAL FOULS: (average) 

Personal By winning team 14; By losing team 18; Both teams 32 

PLAYER DISQUALIFICATION: (Total Average) 

(m) Five fouls 1.3 per game 

(n) All other per game 

TECHNICAL FOULS FOR: Average 

(o) Delay of game per game 

(p) Excess time-out per game 

(q) Failure to report 07 per game 

(r) Unsportsmanlike conduct by player on court per game 

(s) Unsportsmanlike conduct by bench personnel 20 per game 






THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1970 



Page Nine 



Alumnus Football 

By Giantland Rice 

Editor's Note: Most fans know by heart the last two lines 
of this famous poem, but few have enjoyed the entire 14 
verses or have even known the title of this poem. Grantland 
Rice wrote the poem between 1910 and 1916. He died in 
1954. 

Bill Jones had been the shining star upon his college team, 
His tackling was ferocious and his running was a dream. 
When husky William took the ball beneath his brawny arm, 
They had two extra men to ring the ambulance alarm. 

Bill hit the line and ran the ends like some mad bull amuck. 
The other team would shiver when they saw him start to 

buck. 
And when some rival tackier tried to block his dashing pace, 
On waking up, he'd ask, "Who drove that truck across my 

face?" 

Bill had the speed-Bin had the weight— Bill never bucked 

in vain; 
From goal to goal he whizzed along while fragments strewed 

the plain. 
And there had been a standing bet, which no one tried to call, 
That he could make his distance through a ten-foot granite 

wall. 

When he wound up his college course each student's heart 

was sore. 
They wept to think bull-throated Bill would sock the line 

no more. 
Not so with William— in his dreams he saw the Field of Fame, 
Where he would buck to glory in the swirl of Life's big game. 

Sweet are the dreams of college life, before our faith is 

nicked— 
The world is but a cherry tree that's waiting to be picked; 
The world is but an open road— until we find, one day, 
How far away the goal posts are that called us to the play. 

So, with the sheepskin tucked beneath his arm in football 

style. 
Bill put on steam and dashed into the thickest of the pile; 
With, eyes ablaze he sprinted where the laureled highway led— 
When Bin woke up his scalp hung loose and knots adorned 

his head, 

He tried to run the ends of life, but with rib-crushing toss 
A rent collector tackled him and threw him for a loss. 
And when he switched his course again and dashed into the fine 
The massive Guard named Failure did a toddle on his spine. 
Bill tried to punt out of the rut, but ere he turned the trick, 
Right Tackle Competition scuttled through and blocked 

the kick. 
And when he tackled at Success in one long, vicious prod, 
The Fullback Disappointment rubbed his features in the sod. 

BUI was no quitter, so he tried a buck in higher gear, 
But Left Guard Envy broke it up and stood him on his ear. 
Whereat he aimed a forward pass, but in a vicious bound 
Big Center Greed slipped through a hole and slammed him 
to the ground. 

But one day, when across the Field of Fame the goal seemed 

dim, 
The wise old coach, Experience, came up and spoke to him. 
"Old Boy," he said, "the main point now before you win your 

bout 
Is keep on bucking Failure till you've worn the piker our! 

"And, kid, cut out this fancy stuff— go in there, low and hard; 
Just keep your eye upon the ball and plug on, yard by yard, 
And more than all, when you are thrown or tumbled with 

a crack, 
Don't sit there whining — hustle up and keep on coming back; 

"Keep coming back with all you've got, without an alibi, 
If Competition trips you up or lands upon your eye. 
Until at last about the din you hear this sentence spilled: 
"We night as well let that bird through before we aU get killed. 

"You'll find the road is long and rough, with soft spots far 

apart, 
Where only those can make the grade who have the Uphill 

Heart. 
And when they stop you with a thud or halt you with a crack, 
Let Courage caU the signals as you keep on coming back. 



"Keep coming back, and though the world may romp across 

your spine. 
Let every game's end find you still upon the battling line; 
For when the One Great Scorer comes to mark against your 

name, 
He writes — not that you won or lost — but how you played 

the Game." 

— Reprinted from T.S.S.A.A. News- 

THE INDESTRUCTIBLE SPORT 

(Continued from Page One) 

Yet when one puts the myth of the jug-headed, oafish, 
muscle-man under the cold light of logical analysis, it doesn't 
hold up worth a nickel. 

The sophisticates claim the football man is stupid. Yet in 
every high school where I've ever worked, the grade-point 
average of the varsity players was above that of the student 
body as a whole. 

The lank-haired leaders of our current literati sneer at the 
varsity letterman for his juvenile enthusiasms and his willing- 
ness to die for dear old Rutgers. But they themselves are 
quite openly and ardently guilty of enthusiasms over such 
strange causes as the apotheosis of Joan Baez and the possible 
canonization of Mario Savio, and they seem ready to die at a 
moment's notice for a smile from Ho Chi-Minh or even for 
the slightest relaxation of the built-in scowl on Mao Tse-Tung. 
By comparison, dying for Rutgers has its points. 

The intellectual vials of wrath are constantly overflowing 
onto the hapless head of the athlete because of his hopeless 
Philistinism and his alleged inability to communicate with 
his peers save in monosyllabic grunts. 

Yet the halls of Congress and the board rooms of giant 
industrial complexes are alike populated by a striking num- 
ber of ex-athletes who seem to have no difficulty whatever 
in communicating, and the Philistine mentality of such for- 
mer contenders on the playing fields as Douglas MacArthur, 
John F. Kennedy, and Justice Byron "Whizzer" White may 
be left safely for history to judge. 

It's presently fashionable to condemn football scholar- 
ships as anti-intellectual, and to demand that the alumni stop 
recruiting burly sons of coal miners to advance to old school 
colors every Saturday afternoon. Why? 

If a football scholarship win permit a youngster who 
couldn't otherwise afford four years at UCLA or USC to go 
there, what's wrong with that? And as for coal miners' sons, 
we don't have enough of them in college either. 

Don't get me wrong. When the boy gets his break, he's 
got to be able to cut the mustard. Once he gets in, he has to 
hit the books and stand or fall on bis own ability to study 
and to master the same subjects as his classmates. If he can't 
keep up, out he goes. 

If I had my way, I'd abolish all the hypocritical recruiting 
restrictions which furnish such regular and sensational fodder 
for our newspaper sports pages, and I would substitute instead 
the following very simple rules for athletes in our institutions 
of higher learning. 

(1) Any individual or organization which wants to seek 
out muscular young men and pay their way through college 
is welcome to do so. 

(2) The muscular young men must pass the same entrance 
exams and meet the same scholastic requirements as their 
less muscular classmates. 

(3) The athlete's course of study must be of comparable 
status and difficulty with that of the non-athlete. 

(4) Nobody gets any special consideration in testing or 
grading, and flunk-out rules apply to everyone equally. 

These four little commandments would do the trick, I 
think, and would satisfy just about everybody except the 
chronic critics of the game who wouldn't like it even if all 
its practitioners were Phi Beta Kappas and Nobel Prize- 
winners. 

As spring practice gets under way yet once again, I have 
to confess a lifelong fondness for the gridiron gladiators. 

Over the oast thirty years, I've seen a remarkable number of 
then fighting and even dying for their country, and remark- 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1970 



ably few of them ending up in jail or talcing the Fifth Amend- 
ment before a Congressional investigating committee. They 
seem to be conspicuously absent from Communist-inspired- 
demonstrations and Filthy Speech Movements. 

They are, in short, above-average, decent, reasonably pat- 
riotic Americans. Maybe that's why they're under increasing 
attack from the kopks, the crum-bums, the Commies. 

I'm not too worried about the outcome. The love of clean, 
competitive sports is too deeply imbedded in the American 
matrix, too much a part of the warp and woof of our free 
people, ever to surrender to the burning-eyed, bearded draft- 
card-burners who hate and envy the football player because 
he is something they can never be-a man. 

Our greatest soldier-statesman of the twentieth century 
once had this to say about football and the men who follow 
its rigorous and demanding discipline: 

"Upon the fields of friendly strife are sown the seeds 
which, in other days, on other fields, will bear the fruits of 
victory." 

Little enough of idealism and faith and cheerful willingness 
to fight on steadfastly for the right remains to us in these, 
the Sick Sixties. Football, rising surprisingly and increasingly 
above its age-old status as a mere game, serves today as the 
staunch custodian of these treasured concepts out of our past 

There is a tune which has rung out over a thousand hard- 
fought fields. Football's most stirring marching song, it stands 
for far more now than it did when it was first written, so 
long ago. We come here tonight from the four corners of 
this vast country as do all CaUfomians, claiming many col- 
leges for our own, calling a mighty diversity of schools by 
the magical, mystic title "Alma Mater". But all of us, no 
matter whence we hale or how deeply we may love the old 
school for which we played, keep a special spot in our hearts 
for the symbol and the prototype, the bastion and the bulwark 
of American football: the University of Notre Dame. Oh, her 
team may have beaten us from time to time. Or we may have 
beaten her, in which unlikely case we will tell our grandchild- 
ren about it. And rightly so. 

No matter. When her warriors run out upon the gridiron 
whether to win or to lose-when her sons high in the wind- 
swept stadium stand to sing, "What though the odds be great 
or small, old Notre Dame will win over all," a chord deep 
buried within each one of us responds and thrills as it does to 
nothing else in the whole wide spectrum of sports. And we 
join, all of us, half-smiling, half misty-eyed, urging on the old 
team of Rockne and the Gipper and the Four Horsemen, and 
each of his does his personal best to "shake down the thund- 
er from the sky." 

And as we sing, brothers in the great fraternity which is 
football, we know in our hearts that we are really singing not 
just for that small, far-off college in South Bend which has 
earned the hard-bought right to symbolize the greatest of all 
sports, but singing also for ourselves, for those who came be- 
fore and will come after, for the clean, bright, fighting spirit 
which is America herself. 



TRACK QUESTIONS 

(Continued from Page Five) 



8. Situation: In a meet in which competitors may use 
their favorite throwing equipment the discus: (a) preferred 
by Al has a diameter of 8 1/8"; or (b) to be used by Bl 
has a diameter of 8 5/16"; or (c) to be used by CI measures 
8 1/4" in diameter. The weight of each discus is in excess of 
3 lbs. 9 oz. and other specifications are met. 

Ruling: The discus in (a) is illegal, but in (b) and (c) the 
disci are within the maximum and minimum requirements. 
In measuring the implements for competition the meet man- 
agement should carefully review the standards as presented 
in 1-4-1. 

9. Situation: In an outdoor multiple school meet, it was 
previously agreed that individual participants in the shot put 
may use implements of their own choosing provided they 



meet specifications. The choices varied as follows: (a) Al, an 
iron shot; (b) Bl, a brass shot; (c) CI, a plastic shot filled 
with lead pellets; and (d) Dl, an iron shot the size of a 16- 
pound implement but drilled to weigh only 12 pounds. 

Ruling: The implements chosen in (a) and (b) are legal. 
The shot in (c) is legal only for indoor meets. It may not be 
used for outdoor competition. In (d) the shot may not be 
used even though it is the proper weight. The shot shall have 
a smooth surface and the implement described in (d) does 
not conform. 

10. Situation: The pit to be used for the high jump com- 
petition: (a) is filled with sawdust; or (b) contains 24 inches 
of loose foam rubber; or (c) consists of an air mattress in- 
flated to 24 inches; or (d) is filled with sand. 

Ruling: The pits as described in (a), (b) and (c) are legal. 
The use of sand in the high jump landing pit in (d) is illegal. 
Competition is not to be conducted with pits in which sand 
is used. The use of 24 inches of foam rubber or an air mat- 
tress inflated to a height of 24 inches is recommended. The 
new techniques in the high jump require a landing area wnich 
is more resilient than that provided by materials other than 
foam rubber or the air pits. 

11. Situation: In the 120-vard high hurdle event Al runs 
through the hurdles making no attempt to go over them. None 

of the hurdles falls so that other competitors are impeded. 
Al is the first to cross the finish line. 

Ruling: Al is declared the winner. There is no penalty for 
knocking down one or more hurdles except, if the hurdles 
do not conform to rules specification, no record may be al- 
lowed if any hurdle is knocked down. If any of the hurdles 
are forced out of the lane and cause another competitor to 
veer or change his stride in order to avoid them, this con- 
stitutes interference and the offender would be disqualified. 
If it is necessary to rerun the race because of interference, 
the offender will be excluded. 

12. Situation: For the start of the mile, runners Al and 
Bl take a crouching position and CI and Dl a standing pos- 
ition at the starter's command, "On your marks." When all 
are steady, the starter fires the gun. 

Ruling: A legal start. In races of more than 880 yards 
there will be only two starting commands. The participants 
will be called to the starting line on the command "on your 
marks", when all runners are motionless in position, a pistol 
shall be fired to signify the start of the race. I f starting from 
a crouch, the runners must assume their final starting position 
at the command, "On your marks." Any movement between 
that command and firing the gun shall be interpreted as a 
false start. 

13. Situation: During a distance race where lanes are not 
specified a runner steps on the curb for two or three running 
steps while coming around a curve. This occurred during sev- 
eral of the laps in the distance race. In all instances there was 
no other runner near, and there was no interference. The curve 
judge assigned to that particular area indicated the violation 
by waving the red flag. After the race was completed he re- 
ported to the head inspector who then reported to the re- 
feree. The referee did not disqualify the runner. 

Ruling: This is within the referee's jurisdiction. In his 
judgment other runners were not hindered by this action so 
he is not required to disqualify the runner 

14. Situation: In a multiple school meet where there are 
mo preliminary heats for the 880 yard relay and teams are 
assigned to groups and each team is individually timed. Each 
relay race is a final in which team places are determined by 
individual times. In the fust heat, team A fouled team B to 
the extent tnat team B was unable to finish the race. Since 
there was room in a later race, team B was permitted to com- 
pete. 

Ruling: Legal. The meet management is authorized to 
make this type of adjustment. If the described interference 
had occurred in the final heat, the offended team would be 
given the opportunity to compete without interference. In 
this case, ihs final race must be rerun without the offending 
team participating. 






THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR. APRIL, 1970 



Page Eleven 



TRIGG COUNTY - SEMI-FINALIST 
1970 STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Simon Ladd, James Hopson, George Barnes, N. Radford, Billy Alexander. Second 
Row: Asst. Coach Sivills, William Wharton, Lennus Redd, David Fitzwater, Dwight Martin, Bruce Higbee, Ro- 
bert Baker, Eddie Radford, Coach Wallace. 



Supplementary List of 
Registered Baseball Officials 

(List Compiled April 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it 
is the home phone unless otherwise designated. If two num- 
bers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Adams, George David, Letcher, 633-7787, S49-9045 

Adams, William M., Letcher, 633-7787, 633-7787 

Akemon, Rudy, P. O. Box 286, Hazard, 436-5013, 436-2141 

Akin, Steve, Box 152, Dawson Springs, 797-2657 

Allen, Thomas E., 108 Central, Vine Grove, 877-2703, 422- 

3214 
Amburgey, Manuel, Letcher, 633-7021 
Anderson, Kenneth, 861 Parkway Drive, Louisville, 637-1769 

459-1500 
Andress, BUI, 2039 Now Linden Road, Newport, 581-9832, 

221-7400 
Ayers, Edward L., 625 Laramie Road, Lexington, 277-2333, 

277-1161, Ext. 44 

Baker, Paul W., 516 Perry Street, Greenup, 473-6311, 473- 

7251 
Barnes, Karl A., P. O. Box 115, Nortonville, 676-3334 
Bartels, John T„ 1344 Sixth Street, Dayton, 581-4250 
Bennett, James L., Route 1, Box 75, Elkhorn City, 754-5165, 

639-4402 
Bersaglia, Nick, Bulan, 436-4891 
Bersaglia, Ron, Bulan, 436-4891, 436-4891 
Biter, Charles D., 6602 Moor haven Drive, Louisville, 239- 

3580, 452-4631 
Blevins, Boone, Staffordsville, 297-4842, 297-37 38 
Booker, James M., Star Route 42168, Brownsville, 597-3449, 

749-2665 
Branstetter, Elwood, 1 1 5 Kathleen Avenue, Horse Cave, 786- 

2032, 524-5211 
Brock, Lavone, Stoney Fork, 337-3271, 337-3271 
Brown, John W., 975 Waverly, Lexington, 252-3212, 252- 

0954 
Butcher, Douglas, Box 14, Meally, 789-5553, 789-5301 



Calvert, Eston C, Route 1, Box 42, Berry, 234-1783, 234- 

17&3 
Cappel, William F., 822 Perry Street, Covington, 431-0232, 

721-8070 
Chambers, Harold Eugene, Box 276, Edmonton, 432-2762, 

432-2131 
Charles, James B., 15 Cook Avenue, Winchester, 744-5296, 

255-7991 
Chasteen, Earl, Jr., 109 Taylor Drive, Cynthiana, 234-4897, 

234-2040 
Chinn, Clyde, 333-27th. Street, Ashland, 324-5245, 325-4777 
Clark, Barry, 516 Apache, Hopkinsville, 885-5596 
Coleman, Don, RR 2, Winslow, Indiana, 789-4365, 789-2072 
Colvin, Dorce A., 2408 Broadway, Catlettsburg 
Cooper, Willie V., 2206 Madison, Paducah, 443-3107, 444- 

7251 

Daugherty, Roger Franklin, 213 E. McLaugnlin Avenue, Mad- 

isonville, 821-6676, 821-8503 
Daugherty, Thornton E., Jr., Pine Knot, 3S4-368S, 354-2511 
Davit. Morgan, P. O. Box 72-303, Valley Station, 935-4400, 

585-2251, Ext. 240 
Delk, William L., 614 Church Street, Ludlow, 261 8574, 431- 

6151 
Dill, J. Roger, 15 Palmer Manor, Wilmore, 858-4081, 858- 

3581 
Dillcpv, Jeff, 3023 So. 5th. Street, Ironton, Ohio, 532-7498 
Diuguid, Duane, Route 7, Hopkinsville, 269-2253, 269-21 35 
Dooley, George S., Route 1, Cerulean, 885-3896, 386-331 1 
Dougherty, Mike, 2408 Florence Street, Hopkinsville, 886- 

7574 
Felix, Guy W., 2405 Adams Avenue, Ashland, 324-2966, 324- 

8922 
Fennell, Robert Eugene, 503 Lexington, Newport, 581-6910, 

291-5250 
Fish, Leland G., 826 Oak Hill, Lexington, 255-7156, 252- 

2312, Ext. 2535 
Francis, William Lewis, 8909 Brandywyne Drive, Fern Creek, 

239-9859, 585-5081, Ext. 22 
Freeman, Joe T., 125 Byron Drive, Paducah, 898-2006, 898- 

2006 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1970 



Gaskin, Donald Wayne, 1686 Bryan Station Road, Lexington, 

299-1942, 252-2626 
Greer, Raymond Wayne, 6905 Creston Drive, Pleasure Ridge 

Park, 935-5002, 935-5464 
Grimes, Herman L., Salem, 988-2193 

Hale, Richard F., Route 1, Russellville, 726-2801, 734-4621 
Hardin, Harry Stanley, 5813 Rocky Mt. Drive, Louisville, 

968-1894, 239-3267 
Harper, Robie, Beechmont, 476-8084, 476-8411 
Harris, David L., 321 W. Stephen Foster Ave., Bardstown, 

348-5733, 348-3311 
Harrison, Mark, Route 7, Box 279, Hopkinsville, 269-2216 
Heaberlin, Bill, 436 Washington Avenue, Flatwoods, 836- 

6915, 325-8511, Ext. 469 
Henderson, Charles, 316 Andrew Drive, Hopkinsville, 885- 

5771 
Herbert, Jesse L., P. O. Box 1301, Newgarden Station, Ft. 

Knox, 942-3517, 624-4051 
Hildabrand, Gerald Wayne, P. O. Box 313, Lewisburg, 755- 

6562, 755-6191 
Hill, Archie B., Box 71, Williamsburg, 549-2167, 549-2484 
Hilton, Dudley, 516 Walnut Street, Springfield, 336-7667, 

336-3922 
Holbrook, Earl, White Oak 

Hord, Ronnie, Box 74, Campbellsville, 465-5871, 465-7771 
Hudson, Miles F., 407B Stryker Villiage, Ft. Campbell, 798- 

2747, 798-5587 
Hurst, Terry, 416 Kentucky Court, Lexington 

Ingraham, Gary J., 9706 Lanesboro Way, Louisville 425 
5215, 897-2815 

Jamerson, Wilbur R., Box 1, Bypro 

Jenkins, Ronald E., 2116 Gregory Drive, Henderson, 827- 

9545, 826-9527 
Johnson, Leroy, Lamb, 434-2296, 427-2611 
Jones, Dexter, Route 7, Hopkinsville, 269-227 5 
Jones, Thomas V., 50 S. Scott, Madisonville 
Joseph, Jerry, 516 South 7th, Murray, 753-9524, 489-3281 

Kasey, Mike, 220 Springwood Drive, Henderson, 827-2282, 

826-3733 
Kearns, Meredith Wayne, 216 N. Miller, Cynthiana, 234-2297, 

234-1100 
Kinch, Marvin N., 316 College Street, Somerset, 679-3690, 

678-8191 
King, Mike, Route 6, Box 69, Franklin, 586-4729, 586-4636 

Ledden, David, Box 418, Owenton, 484-2230 
Little, Jack Douglas, 1482 Tates Creek Road, Lexington, 266- 
0865, 255-7519 

McBride, W. Kenneth, 157 St. William Drive, Lexington, 266- 

7786, 25S-6666 
McCamish, Dan L., 374 Oak Street, L-10, Radcliff, 351-4812 
Markham, Stan P., 828 E. 11th Street, Bowling Green, 781- 

2379 
Marshall, Barry J., 448 Hollow Creek Road, Apt. C-9, Lex- 
ington, 299-0757, 277-1556 
Martin, Roger K., Park City, 749-842 5, 749-2860 
Moore, Marvin, Box 2425 M.S.U., Morehead, 748-4992 (Bus.) 
Morgeson, James R., 225 N. Forrest, Lebanon, 692-2846 
Morris, Dean, Route 2. Edmonton, 432-3147 
Mudd, James W., 110 Stephen Foster, Bardstown, 284-5511 

(Mooresville, 348-9003) 
Mulberry, Larry Gene, 643 E. 14th Street, Bowling Green, 

842-7003, 425-7568 
Mullins, Ronnie, Fifth Street, Elkhorn City, 754-8969 
Muoio, Raymond A., 309 Mulberry Drive, Lexington, 266- 
8609 

Nash, Robert E., 4107 Pixley Way, Louisville, 969-5603, 937- 

0878 
Newman, Joe D., 218 Paradise Street, Greenville, 338-4246 
Newton, Jerry L., Box 244, LaCenter, 665-5329 
Nucci, Donald D., 102 Main Street, Hazard, 436-2525, 436- 

2741 

Owens, Roy, Route 4, Box 71, London, 864-7489 

Padgett, R. K., 112 Richardson Drive, Somerset, 678-5485, 
678-4141 



Pierson, Oscar, Owenton, 484-3303, 484-3878 

Pilcher, Dennis, Hickory, 247-6206, 623-4349 

Powers, Clark, 716 Link Avenue, Paris, 624-3514, 624-5529 

Prather, Clinton Randal, Route 1, La Grange, 279-5812, 279- 

5812 
Prather, Lee R., 503 N. 5th Avenue, La Grange, 279-6752 
Prather, Vernon, Jr., Owenton, 484-51 19, 484-8029 

Ray, Collins R., 809 N. 32nd., Paducah, 442-2146,442-1979 
Rhodes, Joseph D., 1529 S. Corum Drive, Madisonville, 821- 

7905, 821-4780 
Rigon, Dennis, 322 Wickliffe, Campbellsville 
Rison, Johnny B., 197 Third Street, Ravenna, 723-2852, 723 

2852 
Robbins. Michael Joseph. 778 Jimae, Independence, 356- 

2209, 381-1880 
Roberts, Harry, 417 Monument, Falmouth, 654-S471, 654- 

3314 
Robinson, Joseph Byron, 1120 McConnell Street, Ashland, 

324-0572, 325-8511, Ext. 253 
Rock, W.A..P. O. Box 183, Cave City, 773-8381, 453-2722 
Rodgers, Billy Gerald, Gen. Del., Farmington, 345-2110 
Roller, Otis C, 808 Chamberry Drive, Louisville, 895-6356, 

587-1121, Ext. 396 
Romanello, Daniel J., 4420 Floral Avenue, Norwood, Ohio, 

731-8033. 632-3253 
Rowe, Steve H., Poland Hall, W.K.U., Bowling Green, 745- 

4171. 745-4756 
Salsbury, Don, Route 3, Greensburg, 932-5 577 
Schultz, Harold, 13 Orphanage Road, Ft. Mitchell, 331-1386 
Sharp, Jerry Wayne, 121 S. 21st Street, Middlesboro, 248- 

3916, 248-2930 
Sheperson, Cecil, 199 Riverside Drive, West Liberty, 743- 

3882, 743-3403 
She tier, Vernon G., 114 Sunset Place, Winston Park, Coving- 
ton, 581-9136 
Singleton, Jim, 9017 Cinderella Lane, Louisville, 964-0090, 

366-9561, Ext. 532 
Sinkhorn, Richard, Mitchellsburg, 322-7748, 236-3315 
Skaggs, Randall, Bonnieville, 531-2298 
Smallwood, Talmadge, Stanton, 663-2096 
Smith, Wayne f N., 313 Beechwood Drive, Campbellsville, 46S- 

5268, 384-2751 
Snider, Herbert, 103 Druien Street, Campbellsville, 465-3062 
Staker, Robert, 1237 E. Second Street, Maysville, 564-4274, 

564-4274 
Stanley, O. A., Box 1 S6, Belcher, 754-8567 
Statham, Richard, Route 4, Hickman, 236-2641, 236-2641 
Stevens, James L., 1 10 Hamby Avenue, Dawson Springs, 797- 

2966, 797-2017 
Stone, Joe, 507 Morehead Street, Central City, 754-4364, 

754-2331 
Stout, Louis, 808 Cedarwood Drive, Lexington, 233-0383, 

272-1513 
Straub, Walter, 940 Summit Avenue, Glendale, Ohio, 771- 

7642, 291-8925 
Streible, Howard P., Route 3, Shelbyville, 633-4374, 279- 

5540 
Strickland, Herbert, 105 Friar Drive, Clarksville, Tenn., 647- 

7477, 798-3709 
Strohofer, Raymond A., 3360 Key West Drive, Cincinnati, 

Ohio, 931-0577, 861-1177 
Stuart, Terrance Ray, 909 Orchard Drive, Russellville 
Stull, Benjamin C, Center Street, Wilder, 581-3262, 291- 

5250 
Suhr, George C, 663 Mix, Louisville, 637-6204 

Thornton, Bryce C, 1115 Forrest Court, Ashland, 325-3646, 
928-6414 

Vincent, Jesse C, 308 Fairview Street, Greenville, 338-4740 

Weatherford, Charlie, Bassett Avenue, Hopkinsville, 886-7459 
Wemhoener, James M., P. O. Box 94, Fordsville, 276-521 1 
White, Thomas R., 2516 Hermitage, Louisville, 426-2272, 

366-9561, Ext. 607 
Wolford, W. D., Route 1 , Campbellsville, 465-5459, 465-8880 
Wood, Walter, 562 Stonehaven Drive, Lexington 
Worsham, Ray, Route 1, Monticello, 561-4300, 348-3106 
Wright, J. B., 1017 E. Main, Greenup, 473-7971, 473-9861 



SINCE WE PROVIDE COVERAGE FOR 
ABOUT 50% OF THE SCHOOLS IN THE 
STATE, WE DO HAVE A COMMERCIAL 
INTEREST IN THE ACADEMIC AND 
ATHLETIC PROGRAMS OF ALL OUR 
SCHOOLS. 

BUT OUR REAL INTEREST IS MUCH 
DEEPER, WE ARE VITALLY CONCERN- 
ED THAT GOOD CITIZENSHIP, A SPIRIT 
OF FAIR PLAY, AND A REAL SENSE OF 
PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY BE IN- 
STILLED IN THE YOUTH OF OUR DAY. 

WE BELIEVE THESE ARE THE QUALI- 
TIES THAT HAVE MADE AMERICA 
GREAT, AND ARE THANKFUL FOR 
OUR SCHOOLS AS THEY WORK TO 
CONTINUE THAT GREATNESS. 



^Ue KitUfdeti Gamftfuuf, 



GENERAL AGENT 



W. E. KINGSLEY J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. CHARLES C. PRICE 

Life Department 

121-123 LAFAYETTE AVENUE LEXINGTON, KY. 40502 PHONE 254-4095 

P. O. BOX 7100 



Outdoor playground programs will be conducted in many schools during 

summer months. 

Our stock is complete on all types of playground and play time equipment. 

Try our "WE SHIP THE DAY YOU BUY" service on: 
Basketballs 

Basketball goals 
Volleyballs 

Volleyball nets and posts 
Playground balls of all sizes 
Softballs and softball bats 

Badminton racquets and shuttlecocks 
Nets and complete badminton sets 

Regulation horseshoes in steel and rubber 
Shuffleboard sets and supplies 
Tennis racquets, nets and balls 

If you plan to have baseball or softball in connection with your recreation 
program, we have a complete stock of uniforms, shoes, bats, balls and 
gloves in Little League, Babe Ruth League and regulation sizes. 





We Ship The Day^You BuY' 
HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO., INC 

PHONE CH 7-1941 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 

IT'S PLAY TIME 



Please write or call for complete information and prizes, and our sales- 
men will be glad to call or give you any information and assistance you 
may need. 

Our salesmen have been out since January 1st with the 1970 Football 
and Basketball samples. Our complete line of Spanjian, Rawlings, Mac- 
Gregor, Seco, Wilson and many accessory lines are sure to contain your com- 
plete requirements for a successful Fall and Winter Season. Let us help you. 



HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO. ; INC. 



Mayfield, Ky. 

247-1941 

Roy Boyd, Jim Mitchell 

C.A. Bym, Jr. 

J0 0\0 rft 



Paducah, Ky. 
443-3012 
Eddie Thomis 




TRINITY HIGH SCHOOL SWIMMING TEAM 
KENTUCKY CLASS AAA CHAMPION -1970 




(Left to Right) Front Row: M. Radmacher, M. Jenne, J. Wight, M. Zoeller, T. Cotney, 
B. Davenport, C. Baron. Second Row: S. Sheridan, T. Pursley, J. Roberts, J. Johnson, 
D. Ribar, K. Kremer, M. Suell. Third Row: Coach B. Hublar, S. Smock, P. Thomas, D. 
Fackler, C. Zaephel, C. Smock, B. Curran, C. Young, J. Hardesty, M. Wahl, T. Callahan, 
K. Young, R. Klemenz, D. Wright, T. Zoeller, M. Bryant, K. Kremer. 



Official Organ of the 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

MAY, 1970 






WESTPORT HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS' SWIMMING TEAM 
KENTUCKY CLASS AAA CHAMPION- 1970 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Shelia Neumann, Toni Hawkes, Jeanne Henderson. Second Row: Cathy Enright, 
Becky Phillips, Kathy Belanger, Susan Schafer, Sherrill Brakmeier, Susan Hamm. Third Row: Becky Cress, Betsy 
Rulketter, Kathy Wyatt, Marta Render, Robbin Wright, Dawn Gold, Barbara Davis, Ellie Dailey. 



MODEL HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS' SWIMMING TEAM 
KENTUCKY CLASS AA CHAMPION- 1970 




(Lett to Right) tront Row: T. Thompson, A. Moretz, M. Muncy, L. Roberts, R. Coy, A. Bladen, M. McKinney. 
Second Row: Coach D. Lichty, C. Combs, L. Hume, A. Brown, J. Powell, Ca. Combs, B. Cockerhan. B. Smith, 
Third Row: C. Smith, P. Metcalf, K. Powell, B. Kirkpatrick, C. Wiggins, M. Smith, N. Cornelison, V. Brotherton. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXXII-NO. 10 



MAY, 1970 



$1.00 Per Year 



Minutes Of The Annual Meeting 

The fifty-third annual meeting of the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association was held at the Brown Hotel, 
Louisville, on Thursday afternoon, At'fil 16, 1970. 

President Ralph C. Dorsey called the meeting to order at 
2:30, and asked the Commissioner to call the roll. Sixty re- 
gularly elected delegates or alternates answered the roll call. 

James A. Pursifull moved, seconded by O. C. Leathers, 
that the minutes of the 1969 meeting of the Assembly, which 
had been sent previously to all member schools, oe approved 
without being read. The motion was carried unanimously. 

Commissioner Sanford then gave a report on the activities 
of the Association during the 1969-70 school year. (The re- 
port of the Commissioner appears elsewhere in this issue of 
the magazine.) 

President Dorsey presented to the Assembly newly elected 
Board members J. C. Cantrell and Roy L. Winchester, who 
will represent respectively Sections 3 and 4 for a four year 
period, beginning July 1, 1970. 

President Dorsey stated that consideration of proposals 
was the next order of business. 

L. L. McGinnis moved, seconded by Tom Hunt, that Pro- 
posal I, substituting units of credit for studies in By-Law 3, 
be adopted. The motion was carried unanimously. 

T. G. Florence moved, seconded by Arnold S. Oaken, that 
Proposal II, making it possible for units of credit, to be sub- 
stituted for studies in By-Law 5-4, be adopted. The motion 
was carried unanimously. 

Joe Ohr moved, seconded by James A. Pursifull, that Pro- 
posal III, providing that "September 1" be substituted for 
"October 1" in the first sentence of Article VII of the Con- 
stitution, be adopted. The motion was carried. There were 
three dissenting votes. 

James A. Pursifull moved, seconded by J. M. Burkich, 
that Proposal IV, providing that a contestant becomes ineligi- 
ble on his twentieth birthday, be tabled. The motion carried 
with no dissenting votes. 

O. C. Leathers moved, seconded by Don Stephenson, that 
Proposal V, providing that "swimming" and "wrestling" be 
omitted from the last sentence of By-Law 8, be tabled. The 
motion carried by a vote of 33-17. 

Pete Grigsby, Jr., moved, seconded by L. L. McGinnis, 
that he be allowed to present a proposal from the floor re- 
lative to a seeding plan to be used in district basketball tourna- 
ments. The Commissioner, in interpreting the rules of the 
K.H.S.A.A., explained that such a proposal could not be con- 
sidered by the Delegate Assembly, which had authority only 
to consider changes in the Constitution and By-Laws. He 
stated that changes in tournament and meet regulations may 
be made only by the Board of Control. 

James A. Pursifull moved, seconded by J. M. Burkich, that 
he be allowed to present from the floor a proposal relative to 
the required registration of baseball officials for regular sea- 
son games. The Assembly, by a vote of 34-16, gave Mr. Pursi- 
full this permission. He moved, seconded by Mr. Burkich, 
that "baseball" be deleted from By-Law 22 and By-Law 29-1. 
After a discussion of the proposal, the vote to adopt the pro- 
posal was taken. The proposal failed to carry by a vote of 10- 
39. 

There being no further business, President Dorsey declared 
the meeting adjourned. 

The dinner meeting of the_ Association was held in the 
Crystal Ballroom of the Brown Hotel at 6:00 P.M., with some 
500 school administrators and coaches present. 

Recipient of the Game Guy Award was Rocky Roberts 
of the Bath County High School. Presentation of the award 
was made by W. H. Crowdus. 



The address of the evening was given by Dr. Harold A. 
Meyer, Commissioner of the Ohio High School Athletic As- 
sociation. Dr. Meyer spoke on current problems of schools 
holding membership in high school athletic associations, and 
challenged the school men present to use their programs of 
athletics in solving some of these problems. His address was 
well received. 



1969-70 ANNUAL REPORT 

(Presented to the Delegate Assembly) 

Three hundred fifty-eight schools have joined the Associa- 
tion during the 1969-70 school year. This number compares 
with 362 members last year. 

Financial reports filed by the sixteen regional basketball 
tournament managers show total receipts of $192,793.56. 
District receipts were $278,740.16. These receipts were ap- 
proximately the same as those of last year. 

Attendance at the State Basketball Tournament for the 
eight sessions was 129,934. This was somewhat lower than 
the attendance for 1969. However, receipts held up well, total 
ticket sales for 1970 being $238,835.00. Profits to the As- 
sociation should be the largest in history. These profits will 
almost completely underwrite the current K.H.S.A.A. bud- 
get. A complete record of all receipts and disbursements will 
appear in a subsequent issue of the Association magazine. 

Fifteen hundred fourteen basketball officials, 714 football 
officials, 475 baseball officials, and 23 wrestling officials have 
registered with the Association in 1969-70. Ten football rules 
clinics were held under the direction of Edgar McNabb, and 
105 football officials took the National Federation examina- 
tion for the higher ratings. Of this number, ten were added to 
the Certified list and there were fifty-seven officials on the 
Approved list. Assistant Commissioner Billy V. Wise conduct- 
ed a school for basketball officials, the sixteen regional re- 
presentatives involved later conducting clinics in their res- 
pective areas. Mr. Wise also conducted a school for baseball 
officials, with twenty-one men holding area clinics for um- 
pires and coaches in the areas which they represented. One 
hundred sixty-four basketball officials took the examination 
for the higher ratings, with thirty-five being added to the 
Certified list and 117 receiving the Approved rating. In 1968- 
69, seventy baseball officials took the examination for the 
higher ratings. Of this number, twenty-five were certified and 
thirty-seven were approved. 

It has been necessary to suspend only one member school 
from the Association this year to date. Five schools have been 
placed on probation. Of the six schools, violation of K.H.S.A. 
A. By-Law 17, Practice of Sportsmanship, was involved in 
five of the cases. 

The number of schools maintaining sports sponsored by 
the Association are approximately the same as last year with 
the exception of girls' golf, boys' and girls' track, boys' ten- 
nis, and cross country teams, all of which show a slight in- 
crease. The 1969-70 figures are: boys' golf, 163; girls' golf, 
44; boys' track, 217; girls' track, 132; boys' tennis, 86; girls' 
tennis, 60; beys' swimming, 40; girls' swimming, a; Doys' 
gymnastics, 21; girls' gymnastics, 23; wrestling, 45; baseball, 
293; basketball, 343; football, 185; cross country, 118; rifle 
marksmanship, 10. 

If the expanding program of the Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association has been successful, one of the principal 
factors in this success is the continued cooperation, assistance, 
and constructive criticism of the administrators and coaches 
who represent our member schools. Your continued help is 
solicited. 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1970 



VOL. XXXII-NO. 10 



MAY, 1970 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 40501 

Second class postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Ralph C. Dorsey (1966-70), Horse Cave 

Vice-President . . . Foster J. Sanders (1966-70), Louisville 
Directors-Morton Combs(1968-72),Carr Creek; W. H. Crow- 
dus (1968-71), Franklin; Don Davis (1967-71), Independ- 
ence; James T. Dotson (1968-72), Pikeville, Lee T. Mills 
(1969-73), Frankfort: Richard Vincent (1969-73). Morgan- 
field - Subscription Rate $1.00 per Year 



ZPiom the Commissionei $ (Jffi 



ice 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1969-70 Basketball Participation List 

(Eligibility) 

School's Report on Basketball Officials 

Official's Report on School (Basketball) 



Attention, Principals! 

Approximately 100 principals of K.H.S.A.A. member 
schools have not as yet filed requests this school year for 
their insurance subsidies. If the school is underwriting all or 
part of insurance protection for its athletes, the Board of 
Control will allow a maximum credit or refund of $60 to each 
school for "all sports except football," and an additional 
credit or refund of $40 to each school maintaining a football 
team. Principals of schools which qualify for the credit or re- 
fund should write for reimbursement forms at once. 

Attention, Officials! 

The registration period for K.H.S.A.A. officials is and has 
been for several years the same as the Association fiscal year, 
namely July-June. Advance applications for registration in 
football and basketball are not now being accepted. Previous- 
ly registered officials in these sports will receive their renewal 
application cards at some time during the summer months af- 
ter the new National Federation publications have been re- 
ceived in the State Office. Previously registered officials should 
not send in their renewal fees until they receive these cards. 

Minutes of Board Meeting 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky High School Ath- 
letic Association met at the Kentucky Hotel, Louisville, on 
Thursday morning, April 16, 1970. The meeting was called 
to order by President Ralph C. Dorsey, with all Board mem- 
bers, Commissioner Theo. A. Sanford, and Assistant Com- 
missioners J. B. Mansfield and Billy V. Wise present. The in- 
vocation was given by W. H. Crowdus. 

Tom Mills moved, seconded by Richard Vincent, that the 
reading of the minutes of the March 19th meeting be waived 
since members of the Board had received copies of these min- 
utes. The motion was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner stated that attendance at the 1970 
State Basketball Tournament for the eight sessions was 129, 
934, this being somewhat lower than the attendance for 1969. 
He reported, however, that receipts held up well, total ticket 
salestor 197U being $238,835.00, with profits to the Associa- 
tion being the largest in history. Estimated tournament pro- 
fits are $186,000.00. 

The Commissioner stated that, acting under Board aut- 
hority, a year ago he had negotiated with the Kingden Com- 



pany of Lexington, a two-year catastrophic insurance cover- 
age for K.H.S.A.A. athletes. He presented a report written by 
Mr. J. E. McCreary of the Kingden Company reflecting claims 
paid to date during 1968-69 and 1969-70 under policy No. 
GAA-2022. 

Don Davis moved, seconded by W. H. Crowdus, that the 
insurance subsidy for each school for 1970-71 be a basic a- 
mount of $60.00 with an additional subsidy of $40.00 for 
each school maintaining football. The motion was carried un- 
animously. 

Chairman Foster J. Sanders of the Retirement Committee 
reported that the Association's attorney, Mr. Calvert T. Ros- 
zell, had not finalized retirement contracts for Messrs. San- 
ford and Mansfield, and that the committee hoped to have 
the contracts prepared by the June meeting of the Board. 

Don Davis of the Swimming Committee reported that, 
although the 1970 state swimming meets had been successful, 
certain problems had arisen during the Class AA meet held in 
Lexington, and that a meeting of the committee should be 
called by its chairman prior to the beginning of the 1970-71 
swimming season. 

There was a discussion concerning the need of area meet- 
ings with administrators and coaches from time to time, and 
members of the Board were of the opinion that such meetings 
would be helpful in the matter of rules interpretations and 
Association policy. 

The Commissioner reported the need for basketball re- 
districting in two areas. He read letters from several school 
administrators and coaches, giving suggestions concerning re- 
districting in the areas involved. After considerable discussion 
concerning the matter of redistricting, Morton Combs moved, 
seconded by James T. Dotson, that the Board for 1970-71 re- 
district regions 8 and 12 as follows: Anderson County is to be 
moved from District 42 to District 29. Counties in Region 12 
are to be re-aligned as follows: D.45-Boyle, Garrard: D.46- 
Casey, Lincoln: D.47-McCreary, Wayne, Russell; D.48-Laurel, 
Pulaski. The motion was carried unanimously. 

James T. Dotson moved, seconded by Richard Vincent, 
that Don Davis and W. H. Crowdus be named delegate and 
alternate respectively to the forthcoming annual meeting of 
the National Federation. The motion was carried unanimous- 

iy- 

Morton Combs moved, seconded by Tom Mills, that all 
bills of the Association beginning March 1, 1970, and ending 
March 31, 1970, be allowed. The motion was carried unani- 
mously. 

There being no further business, the meeting adjourned. 



Approved and Certified Baseball Officials 

Some seventy K.H.S.A.A. officials registered in baseball 
took the National Federation examination for the higher rat- 
ings on April 20, 1970. Officials who qualified for advanced 
ratings are as follows: 

Certified Officials 






Jr. 



Ashley, Kenneth 
Bosse, William V 
Calvert, Eston C. 
Cline, Roy E. 
Davis, Bunny 
Duerson, W. R. 
Durbin, Roy 
Elliott, Carroll L. 
Evitts, Harold E. 
Eyle, Edward W., Jr. 
Fish, Leland 
Frankel, Louis S. 
Gaines, Curtis 
Giordano, Al 
Glass, Frank, Jr. 
Griffith, Edwin D. 
Hardin, Don G. 
Hubbs, Cletus 
Jones, Frank 
Jones, Joe S. 
Kaufman, Alvin R. 
Kays, Allie 
Kidwell, James S. 



Kimmel, Jerry 
King, James A. 
Kinney, Paul C. 
Lamb, Paul W. 
Marlette, Ron 
Mattinglv, Charles Pete 
Morgan, Richard 
Morse, Richard K. 
Mulligan, J. T. 
Pardue, Israel L. 
Ring, BUI 
Sandusky, Jerry 
Shaw, Earl 
Singleton, Jim 
Smith, W. Jack 
Smith, Willard N. 
Strain, Richard P. 
Tyre, Donald 
Urlage, Richard 
Wesche, James A. 
Winfrey, Shelby 
Wingfield, Felix G. 
Zirnheld, Leonard 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1970 



Page Three 



Approved Officials 



Anderson, Luthe S. 
Ballenger, Ed 
Burgess, Richard N. 
Butcher, Douglas 
Charles, James B. 
Cornwell, James 
Daniels, Robert 
Dickison, Ruddie 
Francis, William 
Hardin, William 
Hendrix, Jack 
Hord, Tracy, Jr. 
Mooneyhan, James 
Norwood, Donald V. 



Norwood, Thomas 
Peters, W. A. 
Reif, Harry F. 
Rhodes, Joseph D. 
Roe, Doyle "Buddy" 
Rogers, Eldridge 
Sammons, John 
Sellier, Ed 
Taylor, John O. 
Thornton, Bryce C. 
Washer, Jamie 
Williams, Jack 
Wright, John D. 
Wylie, Wayne T. 



KENTUCKY'S GAME GUY 

6 



The Cavana Award 

The Highlands High School of Fort Thomas won the 
M. J. Cavana Swimming Achievement Award for the school 
year 1969-70. This is the ninth year for the award to be given. 

In determining the points which a school competing for 
the award may accumulate, the State Swimming Committee 
secures the following information: 1) current school enroll- 
ment (grades 9-12), 2) number of pupils who can swim 45 
feet in deep water, 3) number of pupils who can swim cor- 
rectly three strokes (crawl, back crawl, elementary backstroke, 
breaststroke, side stroke), 4) number of pupils who hold life- 
saving certificates (American Red Cross or Y.M.C.A.). The 
percentages of the student body Qualifying are applied to 
items 2, 3, and 4, the maximum points for each of these items 
respectively being 40, 40, and 20. Ten points are given to a 
school having a swimming team which enters a minimum of 
three meets, six events in each meet. Ten points are given for 
team participation (six entrants) in the State Swimming Meet. 

Supplementary List of 
Registered Baseball Officials 

(List Compiled May 1) 

Adkins, Garry Len, Route 3, Box 13, West Liberty, 743- 

4523, 783-3S32 
Akridge, Damon, Cloverport, 788-3388 (Bus.) 
Allie, Bert E., 712 GiUey Street, Flatwoods, 836-6538, 324- 

6114 
Anderson, William A., Ill, 405 Legion Blvd. Apt. 13, Owens- 

boro, 684-6454 
Atchison, Terry L., 911 Beecher Street, Louisville, 366-2504, 

587-1121. Ext. 309 

Back, Phillip D., 98 S. Rosemont, Providence, 667-5649, 667- 

2411 
Belcher, William O., LeJunior, 837-2509, 837-2 817 
Bosse, William J., 3306 Roger Street, Covington, 291-8765 
Bottom, Lawrence, Georgetown High School, Georgetown, 

863-3805 (Bus.) 
Boucher, Larry Gene, Jr., 645 Raven Avenue, Frankfort, 223- 

5419, Richmond 622-5186 
Bunch, Charles Douglas, 1569 E. 15th. Street, Bowling Green, 

842-4153. 842-4153 
Burkhart, Clark, Loyall, 573-3831 
Burton Billy J., 401 Barbour Street, Providence 

Cain, James William, 301 Wallace, Richmond, 623-7465 

Camp, Tommy P., Box 158, Barlow, 334-3356, 334-3555 

Cecil, Donnie, Route 1, Rineyville, 877-5877, 624-7317 

Clardy, Barry D., Route 2, Greenville, 338-3510, 338-3036 

Cochran, Ray Delano, Win, 297-3135 

Cochran, T. J., Box 50, Paintsville, 789-8618, 349-2011 

Collins, William E., Jr., Millwood, 879-6261 

Cook, Raymond L., Box 81 B. Crestwood, 241-4083, 241- 

8458 
Crowe, Michael D., 776 Plainview, Madisonville, 821-1374 




Rocky Roberts 

The Kentucky High School Athletic Association gave its 
highest award to an individual on the evening of April 16 
when Director W. H. Crowdus presented Rocky Roberts of 
the Bath County High School the 1970 Game Guy Award. 

Weighing four pounds at birth and fighting for his life, 
Rocky was left with cerebral palsy. He underwent several 
operations, hours of therapy, and many more hours of pain 
and misery. He was finally able to walk with the use of braces 
and crutches. Before he entered school the crutches had been 
thrown away. 

"The Rock" has been manager of the basketball team 
since he was a sixth grader. He is an honor student at his high 
school where he is also a member of the Beta Club. He par- 
ticipates in his physical education class at school, and he 
challenges his fellow classmates to a spot shooting contest on 
the basketball floor. He is currently pitching for his high 
school baseball team, which is his most recent accomplish- 
ment. 

In addition to his school activities, Rocky has found time 
for a very unusual hobby of his own. He is quite a horseman. 
Having learned to ride a bicycle at a very early age, he decided 
that this was too simple so he turned to riding horses instead. 

The K.H.S.A.A. salutes Rocky Roberts, truly a Game 
Guy. 



Daniel, Roger T., P. O. Box 15, Paintsville, 789-3372, 886- 

2311 
Davis, Bunny, 598 W. Lexington Avenue, Danville, 236-2606, 

236-2606 
Davis, Harold T., Box 191, Beaver Dam, 274-4159, 232-4213 
Day, William S., Route 1, Falls of Rough, 879-3348, 879- 

3240 
Downs, Joseph W., 829 Bartley Avenue, Bardstown, 348- 

5123, 348-3991 
Duvall, Danny Earl, 161 1 Oliver Avenue, Bowling Green, 843- 

2258s 842-5101 

Engle, William Cyrus, P. O. Box 46, Hindman, 785-5543 

Farmer, Joseph Tyler, 803 Phillips Lane, Corbin, 528-3508, 

Richmond, 622-2488 
Fartell, George A., 6202 Casper Drive, Pleasure Ridge Park, 

935-4676 

(Continued on Page Seven) 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1970 



1970 Kentucky State High School Swimming Meet 

Plantation Club, Louisville, Kentucky, March 24-25, 1970 

TEAM SCORING - CLASS "AAA" BOYS 





>. 




>. 














X 


£ >. 




TEAM 


■oaS 


>• » 
O o 


■2=3 
§| 


"H5 


u.5 


■a >, 

o S 
3. 


■o o 

> % 

o 22 
2£ 


O u 

2£ 


o Ji 


■a 2 

>■ S 

o S 

25 


■a J2 


-2 c 
o o 
H a. 


Trinity 


10 


28 


23 


22 


3 


14 


n 


23 


17 


30 


24 


205 


West port 


26 


18 


17 


13 


28 


18 


13 


10 


7 


21 


32 


203 


Atherton 


18 


16 


23 





5 


16 


12 


3 


17 


26 


4 


140 


Paul G. Blazer 


22 





14 


16 





8 


16 


26 


5 


2 


20 


129 


Tates Creek 


32 


10 





9 





10 


10 


16 


4 


3 


10 


104 


Covington Catholic 


24 





9 





13 


2 


4 


9 











61 


St. Xavier 


6 





2 


15 


16 








1 








22 


62 


Newport Catholic 


14 








2 


10 





11 








11 


8 


56 


Waggener 


20 








5 





4 


7 


5 








14 


55 


Lafayette 








5 


10 





9 














26 


50 


Henry Clay 





12 





1 





12 








24 








49 


Franklin County 


8 











7 

















18 


33 


Seneca 





9 




















19 








28 


Fern Creek 


4 











11 

















2 


17 


Bryan Station 




















3 











6 


9 


Moore 




















5 














5 


Ballard 


2 
































2 


Eastern 






































Jeffersontown 






































Campbell County 







































1. 200 Yard Medley Relay- 

1. Tates Creek 

2. We^tport 

3. Covington Catholic . 

4. Paul Blazer 

5. Waggener 

6. Atherton 

2. 200 Yaid Freestyle- 

1. E. Bell, Atherton 

2. D. Dean, Westport 

3. J. Ockerman, Henry Clay . 

4. D. Wright, Trinity 

5. W. Roscoe, Tates Creek . . . 

6. S. Sheridan, Trinity 

3. 200 Yard Individual Medley 

1. T. Pursley, Trinity 

2. R. Eli, Paul Blazer 

3. T. Hennessey, Atherton. . . 

4. M. Terry, Atherton 

5. D. Rubenstein, Westport . . 

6. M. Grogan, Covington Cath. 



4. 50 Yard Freestyle - 

1. M. Stuffier, Paul Blazer 

2. L. Bloom, Westport . . 

47.2 3. McAuliffe, St. Xavier 

49.3 4. K. Young, Trinity . . 
52.5 5. A. Parker, Lafayette. . 

54.1 6. D. Quick, Tates Creek 
541 5. Fancy Diving- 
54 - 6 I. J. Thompson 

2. J. Finn 

51.7 3. J. Brettman 

53.2 4. M. Howard 

53.2 5. T. Zimmerman .... 

5 5.6 6. C. Stewart 

56.0 6. 100 Yard Butterfly- 

S?- 1 1. J. Tingley, Atherton. . 

2. K. Young, Trinity . . 

:07.0 3. D. Watkins, Henry Clay 

:08.1 4. C. Sprigg, Westport . . 

: 1 1 .3 S. J. Stanback, Tates Creek 

;11.5 6. C. Wade, Lafayette . . . 

:14.5 Tingley set a new state record 
:16.3 event with his time of : 54.0. 



22.8 
23.2 
23.3 
23.3 
23.4 
24.1 

371.75 
354.35 
320.85 
289.20 
284.55 
250.25 

54.0 
55.2 
57.5 
58.6 



00. 



02.4 
in this 



7. 100 Yard Freestyle- 

1. M. Shiffler, Paul Blazer . . . :50.0 

2. E. Bell, Atherton :50.2 

3. D. Dean, Westport :50.2 

4. D. Wright, Trinity :51.2 

5. W. Roscoe, Tates Creek . . . :51.8 

6. R. Rosing, Newport Catholic :57.8 

8. 100 Yard Backstroke- 

1. M. Richards, Tates Creek :58.7 

2. R. Eli, Paul Blazer :59.5 

3. C. Smock, Trinity 1:00.5 

4. J. Eaves, Paul Blazer 1:00.6 

5. C. Hanson, Westport 1:01.5 

6. J. Abeln, Covington Catholic 1:01.6 

9. 400 Yard Freestyle- 

1. J. Tingley, Atherton . . . 3:58.0 

2. J. Ockerman, Henry Clay . 4:02.7 

3. S. Sheridan, Trinity 4:09.0 

4. D. Watkins, Henry Clay 4:15.9 

5. H. Friedly, Seneca 4:17.8 

6. K. Daniels, Seneca 4:18.5 

Tingley set a new state record in this 

event with his time of 3:58.0. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1970 



Page Five 



10. 100 Yard Breaststroke- 

T. Pursley, Trinity 1:05.3 

T. Hennessey, Atherton. . . 1:06.6 

M. Terry, Atherton 1:06.9 

R. Hassman, Newport Cath. 1:07.4 



5. P. Thomas, Trinity 1:07.8 

6. R. Rubenstein, Westport . 1:07.9 
11. 400 Yard Freestyle Relay- 

1. Westport 3:32.8 

2. Lafayette 3:36.9 



Trinity 

St. Xavier 

Paul G. Blazer . 
Franklin County . 



3.41.3 
3:45.4 
3:48.4 
3:51.1 



University of Kentucky Colisium, Lexington, Kentucky, April 3-4, 1970 



TEAM SCORING - CLASS "AA" BOYS 







>> 
























TEAM 


■o 


£. 


•o a 


>» 








■o u 


•sl 


■o D 


■o 2 


73 2 
































>• 

o 


5 




£s 


> s 


u c 


o S 


O u 


o £> 


>■ 3 

o 3 


>" 


2 <= 
































(S 


^ 




M 5 












i-u. 




*t TS 


HO. 


Highlands 


32 




9 


9 


31 


SO 


6 


9 


24 


17 


20 


26 


233 


Model 


14 




45 


21 


12 


11 


10 


19 


28 


34 


9 


20 


223 


Hopkinsville 


26 




14 


16 


20 


10 


22 


23 


20 


18 


8 


32 


209 


Dixie Heights 


22 




2 


27 


11 


14 


13 


10 


9 


9 


27 


14 


158 


Fort Knox 


20 




7 


7 








9 


11 











22 


76 


Shelbyville 


24 










8 








5 


4 








24 


65 


L'ville Country Day 










13 


11 





16 








1 


17 





58 


Simon Kenton 







16 














16 














32 


Woodford County 
















2 








5 





12 





19 


Beechwood 


































18 


18 


Bellevue 



















11 





2 











13 


Sayre 



















2 








11 








13 


Newport 
















5 


4 

















9 


Danville 




























3 








3 





1. 200 Yard Medley Relay- 




1. 


Highlands 


1:55.2 


? 




:55.3 


3. 


Shelbyville 


2:04.5 


4. 


Dixie Heights. . , . . . 


2:07.3 


S. 


Fort Knox 


2:08.7 


6 


Beechwood 


Msqu. 




2. 200 Yard Freestyle- 




1. 


D. Flerlage, Simon Kenton . 


1:57.6 


2. 


P. Watkins, Model . 


2:01.2 


3. 


J. McKinney, Model . . . 


2:01.6 


4. 


J. Pettengill, Model ... 


2:01.8 


S. 


P. Dorroh, Hopkinsville . . 


2:02.4 


6. 


B. Clouse, Model 


2:10.7 




3. 200 Yard Individual Medley- 




1. 


R. Rabe, Dixie Heights . . 


2:14.3 


2. 


D. Bryant, L'ville C. Day . 


2:17.4 


3. 


B. Dorroh, Hopkinsville. . . 


2:17.8 


4. 


B. Rozen, Model 


2:24.5 


5. 


B. Cornelison, Model . . . 


2:26.8 


6. 


W. Lanham, Dixie Heights . 


2:31.3 




Rabe set a new state record 


n this 


event with his time of 2:14.3. 






4. 50 Yard Freestyle- 




1. 


M. Wilson, Highlands 


23.8 


2. 


B. Higgins, Hopkinsville. . . 


24.0 


3. 


T. Hume, Model 


24.6 


4. 


T. Brady, L'ville C. Day. . . 


25.6 


5. 


S. Hersting, Dixie Heights . 


25.8 



6. J. Bathiany, Highlands . . . :26.6 

B. Higgins set a new meet record in 
the qualifications of this event with his 
time of :23.7. 

5. Fancy Diving— 

1. M. Blades, Highlands. . 

2. M. Megnerey, Highlands 

3. M. Lukens, Highlands 

4. B. Congleton, Model. . 

5. B. Russell, Highlands 

6. R. Moher, Highlands. . 

6. 100 Yard Butterfly- 

1. C. Bryant, L'ville C. Day. . 

2. R. Taglaver, Dixie Heights 

3. B. Shanklin, Hopkinsville 

4. J. Cavana, Bellevue .... 

5. B. Cornelison, Model . . 

6. B. Rickman, Fort Knox. . 

7. 100 Yard Freestyle - 

1. D. Flerlage, Simon Kenton 

2. B. Dorroh, Hopkinsville . . 

3. J. Pettengill, Model .... 

4. C. Carter, Fort Knox . . 

5. S. Hersting, Dixie Heights 

6. T. Scott, Hopkinsville . . 

8. 100 Yard Backstroke- 

1. T. Hume, Model 

2. D. Kiering, Highlands . . 

3. B. Rozen, Model 



C. Heilman, Highlands ... 1:09.5 
M. Cayce, Hopkinsville . . . 1:09.6 
K. Taglaver, Dixie Heights . 1:10.2 



. 


331.80 




9. 400 Yard Freestyle- 




. 302.45 


1. 


J. McKinney, Model . . 


. 4:27.3 


. 295.40 


2. 


P. Dorroh, Hopkinsville 


4:30.9 


. 293.90 


3. 


B. Clouse, Model .... 


. 4;34.5 


. 281.60 


4. 


K- Knapp, Sayre 


4:45.2 


. 254.95 


5. 


S. Miller, Highlands. . 


. 4:47.9 




6. 


J. Brady, Dixie Heights 


4:39.0 


. 1:02.6 








. 1:03.2 
1:05.9 




10. 100 Yard Breaststroke- 




1. 


R. Rabe, Dixie Heights . . 


. 1:07.8 




2. 


D. Bryant, L'ville C. Day 


. 1:07.9 


. 1:06.9 


3. 


T. Ewing, Woodford Co. 


1:11.9 


4. 


D. Crooks, Highlands 


1:13.3 




5. 


W. Lanham, Dixie Heights 


1:13.4 






6. 


B. Bathiany, Highlands . . 


1:14.6 




55.1 










55.8 




11. 400 Yard Freestyle Rel 


ay- 




57.2 


1. 


Hopkinsville 


. 3:55.6 




58.9 


2. 


Highlands 


3:59.4 




3. 


Shelbyville 


4:05.7 


1:02.7 


4. 


Fort Knox 


4:10.8 


. 1:05.1 


5. 


Model 


4:14.2 




1:06.0 


6. 


Beechwood 


4:35.5 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1970 



TEAM SCORING - CLASS "AA" GIRLS 



TEAM 


•o as 

>• a 


T3 o 

s % 

o % 

8£ 


g c 


11 

> s 


g •> 


■o >, 
>• 5 


■o o 
S >. 
>• IS 

O u 

2£ 


|l 

o u 

2£ 


■o o 

>• s 

O u 


•o S 

> % 

o 2 
25 


•o 2 

•2 


5 S 

2° 

ho. 


Model 


26 


33 


28 


15 


12 


11 


13 


21 


34 


45 


20 


258 


Highlands 


32 


13 


IS 


23 


43 


17 


6 


16 


17 


24 


32 


238 


Hopkinsville 


24 


13 


4 


14 


3 


12 


13 


12 


17 


3 


26 


141 


Dixie Heights 


10 


13 


22 








25 


9 


12 





5 


14 


110 


Bourbon County 


20 


11 


7 


9 


4 


3 


12 


13 


13 








92 


Shelbyville 


8 


7 





22 








11 


11 





4 


18 


81 


Villa Madonna 





3 





1 


10 


14 


10 


4 





10 


22 


74 


Beechwood 


22 








4 


11 

















10 


47 


Fort Knox 


14 





























24 


38 


Sayre 








16 





3 





16 














35 


Murray 

















11 








12 








23 


Woodford County 











s 








3 














8 


Good Shepherd 














7 




















7 


Margaret Hall 








1 




















2 





3 


Frankfort 























3 











3 


Newport 






































Simon Kenton 






































Danville 






































LVille Country Day 






































Bellevue 







































1. 200 Yard Medley Relay- 

1. Highlands 2:15.2 

2. Model 2:16.8 

3. Hopkinsville 2:22.7 

4. Beechwood 2:23.8 

5. Bourbon County 2:22.0 

6. Villa Madonna Disqu. 

2. 200 Yard Freestyle- 

1. N. Cornelison, Model . . . 2:22.4 

2. N. Spears, Dixie Heights 2:27.5 

3. E. Payne, Hopkinsville . . . 2:28.6 

4. C. Gibson, Bourbon Co. . 2:29.9 

5. B.Smith, Model 2:31.6 

6. S. Bezold, Highlands 2:31.9 

3. 200 Yard Individual Medley- 

1. L. Ireland, Sayre 2:26.6 

2. T. Newport, Dixie Heights . 2:32.7 

3. C. Combs, Model 2:39.4 

4. T. Thompson, Model . . . 2:40.4 

5. S. Klausing, Highlands . . . 2;41.0 

6. V. Daniels, Dixie Heights . 2:49.5 
Ireland set a new state record in this 

event with her time of 2:26.6. 

4. 50 Yard Freestyle- 

1. N. Jones, Highlands :27.4 

2. A. Brown, Model :27.6 



B. Buckner, Shelbyville . . 
L. Munday, Hopkinsville 
K. McCarthy, Shelbyville 
L. Patrick, Bourbon Co. 

5. Fancy Diving- 

T. Wight, Highlands .... 
J. Kohl, Highlands .... 
V. Brotherton, Model . . 
L. Ransdell, Beechwood. . 
D. Battle, Villa Madonna 
G. Robertson, Highlands 

6. 100 Yard Butterfly - 
T. Newport, Dixie Heights 

C. Austin, Villa Madonna 
S. Klausing, Highlands . . 
M. Battle, Murray .... 
A. Munday, Hopkinsville 
M. Taglaur, Dixie Heights 

7. 100 Yard Freestyle- 

L. Ireland, Sayre 

A. Brown, Model 

M. Gibson, Bourbon Co. 

B. Buckner, Shelbyville . . 
S. Walthers, ViUa Madonna 
V. Daniels, Dixie Heights 

8. 100 Yard Backstroke - 
M. Klausing, Highlands . . 



:28.5 
:29.7 
:30.9 
:31.0 

313.95 
299.60 
281.05 
280.75 
250.25 
245.45 

1:07.6 
1:10.0 
1:11.6 
1:14.7 
1:17.2 
1:17.3 

:58.8 
1:02.3 
1:04.4 
1:06.2 
1:06.9 
1:07.3 



S. Gibson, Bourbon Co. . . 


1 


13.6 


N. Spears, Dixie Heights. . 


1 


17.6 


N. Pearce, Shelbyville . . 


1 


18.9 


J. Thornton, Hopkinsville 


1 


19.7 


L. Roberts, Model . . . . 


. 1 


21.1 


9. 400 Yard Freestyle- 




N. Cornelison, Model . . 


. 5:09.8 


C. Gibson, Bourbon Co. 


. 5:17.5 


M. Battle, Murray . . . . 


5:17.8 


E. Payne, Hopkinsville . . 


. 5:23.4 


S. Bezold, Highlands . . 


. 5:29.4 


B. Smith, Model 


. 5:31.2 


10. 100 Yard Breaststrok 


e- 


C. Combs, Model . . . . 


1 


18.7 


D. Reed, Highlands .... 


l 


21.0 


B. Cockerham, Model . . 


l 


22.0 


L. Kappes, Highlands . . 


l 


2 3.4 


C. Combs, Model . . . . 


1 


23.6 


M. Redden, Villa Madonn 


a 1 


23.9 


11. 400 Yard Freestyle P 


elay- 


Highlands 


. 4:42.9 


Hopkinsville 


. 5:00.3 


Fort Knox 


. 5:00.9 


Villa Madonna 


5:02.0 


Model 


. 5:12.2 


Shelbyville 


5 


22.9 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1970 



Page Seven 



Plantation Club, Louisville, Kentucky, March 24-25, 1970 



TEAM SCORING - CLASS "AAA" GIRLS 





>» 




>» 














j* 


£ >. 




TEAM 


•ob: 


■O u 

>> « 

O u 


"S 5 


if 

in \A< 


U.2 


■o >. 

5c 
> S 

§ I 

.-< 03 


•o o 
> V, 

© S> 

2£ 


■2| 

>l 

o u 

2£ 




•a S 

o 2 
25 


•a .2 

§1 


2 c 
o'o 
h-a. 


Westport 


20 


24 


12 


13 


31 


2 


13 


26 


27 


12 


26 


206 


Sacred Heart 


10 


22 


23 


16 


11 


11 


27 


20 


11 


29 


24 


204 


Ballard 





11 


2 


16 


26 


4 


12 


7 





24 


18 


120 


Paul G. Blazer 


24 


4 


9 


15 





13 


13 


12 


7 





22 


119 


Henry Clay 


26 


3 


10 


7 








7 





13 





32 


98 


Atherton 


8 


22 











20 








IS 


5 


14 


84 


Seneca 


32 


S 


5 


5 














20 


11 


4 


82 


Eastern 


6 


2 


28 








25 





12 








6 


79 


Waggener 


14 








11 


23 


5 














10 


63 


Tates Creek 


22 




















11 





10 


2 


45 


Notre Dame 

















1 


12 


5 





2 


20 


40 


Bryan Station 











10 








9 














19 


Burrett 








4 








12 

















16 


Fern Creek 


4 











2 

















8 


14 



1. 200 Yard Medley Relay- 

1. Seneca 2:03.4 

2. Henry Clay 2:07.9 

3. Paul Blazer 2:08.1 

4. Tates Creek 2:10.6 

5. Westport 2:10.7 

Seneca set a new state record in this 

event with their time of 2:03.4 

2. 200 Yard Freestyle- 

1. K. Wyatt, Westport : . . . . 2:01.3 

2. K. Handy, Atherton 2:03.8 

3. D. Wright, Sacred Heart. . . 2:04.0 

4. B. Sprigg Ballard 2:10.6 

5. N. Campisano, Sacred Heart 2:12.1 

6. L. Amick, Atherton 2:18.9 

Wyatt set a new state record in this 

event with her time of 2:01.3. 

3. 200 Yard Individual Medley- 



1. S. Shields, Eastern .... 

2. M. Baker, Sacred Heart. . 

3. J. Durham, Eastern .... 

4. T. Hawkes, Westport . . 

5. S. Kessinger, Henry Clay 

6. K. Sweet, Paul Blazer . . 
4. 50 Yard Freestyle- 

1. L. Bethune, Ballard .... 

2. K. Watson, Paul Blazer . . 

3. D. Epperson, Sacred Heart 

4. M. Hoagland, Waggener. . 



2:19.0 
2:19.2 
2:24.4 
2:26.5 
2:26.9 
2:27.2 

26.0 
26.4 
26.6 
26.8 



5. A. Green, Bryan Station . :26.8 

6. S. Neumann, Westport . . . :27.1 
Bethune set a new state record in this 

event with her time of :26.0. 

5. Fancy Diving- 

1. S. Peters, Westport . . 

2. L. Paine, Waggener . . 

3. M. Bridgers, Westport 

4. M. Troutman, Ballard 

5. K. Penna, Waggener . . 

6. G. Palmieri, Ballard . . 

6. 100 Yard Butterily- 

1. S. Shields, Eastern . . 

2. K. Handy, Atherton . . 

3. R. Martin, Durrett . . 

4. A. Daniels, Sacred Heart 

5. K. Sweet, Paul Blaze 

6. L. Sexton, Eastern 
Shields set a new state record 

event with her time of 1 :01.15. 

7. 100 Yaid Freestyle- 

1. D. Wright, Sacred Heart. . 

2. K. Watson, Paul Blazer . . 

3. L. Bethune, Ballard . . 

4. D. Epperson, Sacred Heart 

5. D. Amr, Notre Dame . . 

6. A. Green, Bryan Station. . 

8. 100 Yard Backstroke- 5. 
1. R. Wright, Westport 1:04.1 6. 



372.85 
369.00 
362.40 
357.75 
342.15 
341.15 

1:01.15 
1:03.07 
1:06.44 
1:06.72 
1:07.99 
1:11.44 
in this 



56.7 
57.3 
57.6 
57.8 
00.0 
01.4 



2. N. Campisano, Sacred Heart 1:05.2 

3. J. Romick, Paul Blazer . . . 1:06.7 

4. S. Hoff, Tates Creek . . . 1:08.1 

5. J. Henderson, Westport . . . 1:09.2 

6. J. Durham, Eastern 1:09.4 

Wright set a new state record in this 

event with her time of 1:04.1. 



9. 400 Yard Freestyle - 

T. Hawkes, Westport . . . 4:20.4 

P. Borah, Seneca 4:20.9 

K. Kessinger, Henry Clay 4:40.7 

A. Daniels, Sacred Heart . 4:42.1 
L. Smick, Atherton . . . 4:53.4 
M. Render, Westport . . . 4:53.7 

10. 100 Yard Breaststroke - 

M. Baker, Sacred Heart ... 1:13.4 

B. Sprigg, Ballard 1:13.8 

C. Schroering, Sacred Heart. 1:14.1 

S. Estep, Seneca 1:16.8 

K. Kessinger, Tates Creek . . 1:17.5 
B. Phillips, Westport 1:20.3 

11. 400 Yard Freestyle Relay - 

Henry Clay 4:07.3 

Westport 4:13.3 

Sacred Heart 4:24.4 

Paul G. Blazer 4:25.2 

Notre Dame 4:34.9 

Ballard 4:39.4 



BASEBALL OFFICIALS 

(Continued from Page Three) 

Fox, Kenneth, P. O. Box 401, South Shore, 932-4767, 932- 
3323 

Gamble, Gerald, 232 Helm Street, Elizabethtown, 9-1212 

Garrett, Doyle, Box 248, Loyall, 573-5170 

Gibson, James D., Box 457, Route 3, South Point, Ohio, 377- 

2501,928-6473 
Glass, Jim W., Garrison, 757-5351 
Griffith, Edwin Dale, 2714 Lorraine Street, Ashland, 324- 

2497, 325-8511, Ext. 335 



Hall, Jack R., Elkhorn City, 754-8175 

Hall, Michael, Drakesboro, 476-8555 

Hampton, Donald R., 305 Main, Vanceburg, 796-2562 

Henry, Frank, 517 Clinton Road, Lexington, 266-0087 

Hicks, Shirley Gene, Box 285, Jericho Road, La Grange, 279 

6441, 279-6336 
Hinkley, Dale, Pleasureville, 878-5923 
Hullett, William R., Route 1, Rockfield, 842-9693 

Jones, Harold, 405 N. Franklin, Princeton, 365-5095, 365- 

5615 
Jones, James Michael, 203 Green Street, Manchester, 598- 

3793, 864-6910 
Joseph, Hershell, Short Street, Prestonsburg, 886-2255 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1970 



Kolasa, Johnny, 103 Grundy, Springfield, 336-3710 

Lambert, Irvin, 5110 Rural Way, Louisville, 969-4718, 582- 

5504 
Latham, Gene E., R. R. 4, Albany, 387-6585 
Lay, Claude Richard, Jr., 407 New York Road, Cumberland 

589-4643 
Lee, Bill, Route 1, Leitchfield, 259-4661, 879-4211 
Lile, Clyde F., 429 Henderson Drive, Hopkinsville, 886-5584, 

886-4463 
Logan. Mike, South Shore, 932-3767 

McAdams, Charles Louis, 622 E. 13th Street, Bowling Green, 
781-3110 

McCelland, John Michael, 613 Baldwin Avenue, Lexington, 
269-2598 

McClure, Jerry T., 1107V2 Winchester Road, Lot. 53, Lexing- 
ton, 233-1336 

McCord, Floyd D., Pinecrest, Apt. 11, Paris, 987-1619 

McGhee, Elmer E., Caneyville, 879-3372 

McGinty, L. V., P.O. Box 226, Pikeville, 437-4720, 432-1226 

Maness, Charlie, Frenchburg, 744-6000 (Bus.) 
Mason, Edwin M., Marwill Apts., Carrollton, 732-4844, Rich- 
mond 622-4011 
Maxey, Richard E., P. O. Box 444, London, 4-7301 (Bus.) 
Middleton, John, 209 Leimaur Drive, Richmond, 623-1682 
Miller, James Clayton, 212 Central Avenue, Leitchfield, 259- 

3892, 259-3850 
Mitchell, Edward D., Box 41, Park City, 749-8401, 651-2398 
Moody, William C, 5503 Yucca Lane, Apt. 1, Louisville 
Morris, John T., 6629 Charann Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio, 542- 

6713, 321-1434 
Murphy, David Gary, 230 W. Chandler Street, Lebanon 

Pardue, Eugene, P. O. Box 144, Beechmont, 476-8480, 476- 

2771 
Patton, Edward, McDowell, 377-2456, 886-6526 
Peters, W. A., Route 1, Box 213, London, 864-615 5, 864- 

5278 
Phelps, Clovis, Jr., 109 May Street, Somerset, 678-8683 
Phillips, Thomas M., Route 2, Box 474, Pikeville, 432-3380 

(Bus.) 
Purcell, Jim, Caneyville, 879-6056 

Reeves, Curtis R., 112 Londonderry Drive, Lexington, 252- 

1626, 254-6412, Ext. 330 
Riley, James Douglas, Route 7, Bowling Green, 843-6700 
Robertson, Julian, RR 1, Germantown, 724-3202 
Roe, Doyle "Buddy", Jr., Isom, 633-2973, 633-2961 
Rouse, Edward O., 5105 Serenade, Cincinnati, Ohio, 471- 

5993 
Runyon, Tommy D., Box 181, Belfry, 353-7883. 353-7916 

Sellier, Edward F., Sr., 520 Cricklewood Drive, Lexington 

299-8042, 299-4027 
Shaw, James, Box 163, Eddyville, 388-7913, 685-2911 
Shemwell, Bobby W., Route 7, Glenview Drive, Glasgow, 

678-4339, 651-3911 
Smoot, Dick, 1008 Norwood, Ashland, 324-81 87, 836-6884 
Stafford, Ron J., 604 Brockton, Richmond, 623-7633 
Staten, David L., 615 22nd. Street, Ashland, 325-8571, Ext. 

42 
Stevenson, Michael G., Route 3, Russellville, 726-9706 
Straus, William W., 212 Culpepper, Lexington, 266-6349 
Sturgeon, Julius, Cloverport, 788-6465, 788-3388 
Sumner, Carl H., 3133 Doreen Way, Louisville, 454-7294, 

459-1030, Ext. 205 
Sumner, Clayton, Beechmont 

Taylor, Dan C, Jr., Letcher, Whitesburg, 633-2524 

Thomas, Joseph E., 400 Burch Road, Ft. Campbell, 431- 

4705, 798-2286 
Trimble, James D., Frenchburg, 768-3741 
Trussell, Terry, 309 2nd. Street, Carlisle, 389-5082, 289-2266 

Vincent, Johnny J., R. R. 2, Smith Grove, 597-3434, 597- 

2975 
Vincent, Roy, 528 Rogers Avenue, Greenville, 338-2451, 338- 

3500 

Wayne, Bill T., 2906 Green River Road, Henderson, 826-9441 
Weber, Nicholas J., 204 Oxford Place, Louisville, 895-8087 



Wells, Bobby W., P. O. Box 294, Prestonsburg, 886-2101, 

886-2354 
White, Roger C, Kirwan Towers 1, P. O. Box 150, Lexington, 

258-9000, Ext. 39373 (Bus.) 
Wilbert, Louis, 3504 Terrier Lane, Louisville, 458-4092, 368- 

2559 
Williams, Robert H., University Heights, No. 4, Hopkinsville, 

885-5403, 886-4463 
Wills, Larry, Rural Route 2, Carlisle, 289-5292 
Withers, Hobert, Jr., 615 North College Street, Somerset, 

678-4576, 678-4741 

Zibart, Sig, 8905 Pine Lake Drive, Louisville, 267-7990, 5 87- 

1121, Ext. 219 
Zwick, William Clark, 607 Brockton, Richmond, 623-3589 



The State Gymnastics Meet 

The Bryan Station High School and the Seneca High 
School won respectively boys' and girls' state championships 
in gymnastics during the 1970 K.H.S.A.A. State Gymnastics 
Meet, held in Lexington on March 28, 1970. 

Total points scored by the Bryan Station team were 107. 
The Iroquois High School was second with 81. In the girls' 
meet the Seneca High School scored 49 points. The Tates 
Creek High School was second with 37. U.K. Staff member 
James Nance, a member of K.H.S.A.A. Gymnastics Commit- 
tee, was manager of the meet. 

Five schools entered teams in the boys' division. They 
were: Bryan Station, Iroquois, Lafayette, Mt. Sterling, and 
Tates Creek. There were twelve schools represented in the 
girls' division. They were: Atherton, Bryan Station, Butler, 
Doss, Iroquois, Lafayette, Mt. Sterling, Paul G. Blazer, Plea- 
sure Ridge Park, Russell, Seneca, and Tates Creek. 

Results of the Meet 

BOYS 
Final Team Totals 

(1) Bryan Station, 107; (2) Iroquois, 81; (3) Tates Creek, 
7; (4) Lafayette, 3. 



KEY 

BS-Bryan Station; I-Iroquois; TC- Tates Creek; L-Lafayette 
Individual Events 

All-Around-1. Don Watkins (I); 2. Mike Gregory (I); 3. 
Dan Blevins (BS). 

Free Exercise-1. Gary Boston (BS); 2. Derrick Johnson 
(BS); 3. David Gorham (BS). 

Parallel Bars-1. Don Watkins (I); 2. Shannon Reynolds 
(BS); 3. Mike Ledbetter (I). 

Rings- 1. Dan Blevins (BS); 2. Donald Soper (BS); 3. Mike 
Gregory (I). 

Side Horse-1. Phil Brown (I); 2. Don Watkins (I); 3. Clin- 
ton Edwards (BS). 

Horizontal Bar-1. Dan Blevins (BS); 2. Joe Rhea (I); 3. 
Cossey Cooper (BS). 

Vaulting-1. Derrick Johnson (BS); 2. Mike Gregory (I); 
3. Donald Soper (BS). 

Trampoline-1. Derrick Johnson (BS); 2. Lamont Lawson 
(BS); 3. Mike Gregory (I). 

Tumbling-1 . Derrick Johnson (BS); 2. Gary Boston (BS); 
3. David Gorham (BS). 

GIRLS 
Final Team Totals 

(1) Seneca, 49; (2) Tates Creek, 37; (3) Paul Blazer, 26; 
(4) Bryan Station, 15; (5) Iroquois, 13; (6) Butler, 8: (7) 
Russell, 7. 

KEY 

S-Seneca; TC- Tates Creek; PB-Paul Blazer; BS-Bryan Sta- 
tion; I-Iroquois; B-Butler; R-Russell. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1970 



Page Nine 



AIl-Around-l. Adele Gleaves(S); 2. Kathy Kincer (TC); 
3. Becky Johnson (PB). 

Trampoline-1. Adele Gleaves (S); 2. Elicia Woodall (BS); 
3. Dorothy Frith (TC). 

Uneven Parallel Bars-1. Adele Gleaves (S); 2. Kathy Nar- 
doff (I); 3. Kathy Kincer (TC). 

Balance Beam-1. Adele Gleaves (S); 2. Kathy Kincer (TC); 
3. Elicia Woodall (BS). 

Vaulting-1. Adele Gleaves (S); 2. Pam Jones (I); 3. Debbie 
Smith (B). 

Free Exercise-1. Adele Gleaves (S);2. Kathy Kincer (TC); 
3. Becky Johnson (PB). 

Tumbling-1. Adele Gleaves (S); 2. Kathy Kincer (TC); 3. 
Becky Johnson (PB). 



GUEST EDITORIALS 



KEY ROLE FOR ATHLETICS 

By Thaddeus Seymour 

EDITOR'S NOTE: The following presentation regarding 
the role athletics can play in helping bridge the generation 
gap in America today was made by Thaddeus Seymour, Presi- 
dent of Wabash College, May 27, 1969, at the Union Club, 
New York City. 

This is a generation that is deeply concerned with values. 

We must continue to listen to our young people because 
they are asking good questions. Actually, the current gen- 
eration in colleges and universities is performing the function 
of questioning what has gone before. Furthermore, and per- 
haps even more important, the current generation is testing 
our capacity to listen. 

STUDENT FRUSTRATION 

Student "activism" has been concerned with educational 
experience outside of the classroom. Students are seeking re- 
levance. Much of their frustration results from the gap be- 
tween their classroom learning and the needs of the society 
which they seek to serve. 

It is this out-of-class experience which is, perhaps, the 
most crucial question in higher education today, for that is 
where the student develops as an individual - as a member 
of the society. 

We must never forget that a student who spends four 
years at our colleges takes some forty course for a total of 
2,000 hours. This boils down only to 2V4 months in class. 

Obviously he needs time to prepare, to sleep and eat, and 
usually to earn some money. Nevertheless, there is a great 
deal of time left outside the classroom for the educational 
process that goes on there, almost unrealized and little ap- 
preciated, which will shape him as an individual and as a 
citizen. 

SHAPING PERSONAL VALUES 

It is during these hours that the student shapes his per- 
sonal values and develops the confidence to put his abilities 
to work. Indeed, the whole process of formal education has 
meaning only as it is applied to the needs of society and used 
as a force for good. Outside the classroom, a student learns 
the practical lessons of life and gains the experience which 
will test his capacity to function as a citizen in the society. 

We all know that our students are increasingly frustrated. 
All of us who are committed to careers in education are 
equally frustrated by the gap which has developed between 
our institutions and our students. 

Student government, for example, no longer is the co- 
operative effort of students and their college working toget- 
her for the present and future welfare of the place. 

Student government now represents the shock troops of 
student revolt and a college's effort to work with student 
government seems inevitably to produce conflict rather than 
cooperation. In short, most traditional forms and structures 
on the contemporary campus provide little opportunity for 
closing the "generation gap." 



SENECA H.S. GIRLS' GYMNASTICS TEAM 
1970 K.H.S.A.A. STATE CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Patty Collins, Adele Gleaves, Julia Ray. Team 
member Barbara Kilness not in picture. 



KEY ROLE FOR ATHLETICS 

For these reasons, it seems to me that today, more than 
ever before, athletics play an essential role in the educational 
process. Indeed, athletics may be the only way that an in- 
stitution can effectively participate in the development of a 
student as a person. 

I believe that athletics are important for three reasons. 
First, and most important in my judgment, is the athlete's 
relationship to his coach. 

From experience, the one man who literally bridges the 
gap between the generations is - the coach. He provides the 
experience of another generation in his everyday dealings 
with the undergraduates. 

Today, if you want to get a job done, it takes hard work. 
And to achieve a goal it requires perseverance, persistence 
and self-discipline - all of which can be attained through 
the college coach. 

SELF-DISCIPLINE 

We have learned that teamwork is the ultimate test in 
tolerance. On the playing field quality is achieved by the 
coach and his capacity to teach discipline. When measured 
in competition discipline is, in truth, self-discipline. 

Second, athletics provide a student with an important re- 
lationship with his contemporaries. One compounding source 
of frustration for most students is the fact that most of their 
time is devoted to talk - analyzing, criticizing, lashing out 
at established institutions. - 

And third is the important education that comes from 
the training and competition of a sport. It is here that students 
learn directly that hard work brings results. They learn those 
classic lessons of competitiveness, sacrifice, and sportsman- 
ship. 

We are privileged to know that through athletics we can 
provide the undergraduates with exactly what is wanted - 
participation by the undergraduates at every level 

DESIRE TO IDENTIFY 

When you study these real desires of today's undergrad- 
uates it is easy to understand if there is anything the students 
hunger for it is that burning desire to identify with the col- 
lege or university he attends. 

However, there is a general lack of discipline at all levels 
of authority and among the undergraduates which tends to 
thwart us all. 

It was Lord Moultin who said, "The measure of a civili- 
zation is the degree of its obedience to the unenforceable." 

No one has put it better than Edmund Burke when he 
wrote, "Men are qualified for civil liberties in exact propor- 
tion to their disposition to put moral chains upon their own 
appetites." 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1970 



HIGHLANDS HIGH SCHOOL BOYS' SWIMMING TEAM 
KENTUCKY CLASS AA CHAMPION- 1970 




(Left to Right) Front Row: G. Neal, M. Ravenscraft, B. Simpson, R. Otto, L. Dosch, D. Rice, R. Daley. Second 
Row: J. Miller, D. Knaebel, T. Dupont, M. Jurgens, B. Cull, S. MacMillan, T. Hamel. Third Row: J. Perry, S. 
Cull, D. Cottrill, M. Slaughter, D. Pendery, D. Mettens. Fourth Row: D. Long, C. Grimm, P. King, J. Simpson, 
D. Dierig, J. Meyer. Fifth Row: D. Farrell, K. Pryse, A. Harper, S. Miller, M. Wilson, D. Crooks, D. Houliston. 



1970 Annual Meeting 



Kentucky High School Coaches Association 

The annual meeting of the Kentucky High School Coaches 
Association was held April 16, 1970, in Room 101 of the 
Convention Center in Louisville during the Kentucky Educa- 
tion Association meeting. 

The meeting was called to order at 10:05 a.m. by Bill 
Case of Bourbon County. Don Morris, Basketball coach of 
East Hardin, gave the invocation. 

As the minutes of the Association are published in the 
Athlete, the official publication of the Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association, it was moved by Hancock, and second- 
ed by Smith, that the reading of the minutes by dispensed 
with. Motion carried. 

Sec.-Treas. Joe Ohr gave a financial report to the more 
than 100 members present. Mimeographed copies of the an- 
nual audit were given to the members and audit is to be 
published in the Athlete. Howard moved that the report be 
accepted and Davenport seconded the motion. Motion passed. 

Coach Bill Harrell, Morehead State University basketball 
coach and former Coach of the Year in Kentucky High School 
athletics, was presented as the feature speaker by Case. Har- 
rell spoke on "The Three Keys of Life," listing Dedication, 
Discipline, and Desire. The first of the keys found Harrell 
giving praise to George Giles, former school head of Shelby 
County and Litten Singleton, present superintendent of Berea 
Community Schools. In discussing Discipline, he stated that 
"it is a by-product ot good coaching, it snows up in later life 
by self control." Harrell said that the greatest coach was 
Christ and cited that "He took twelve men and changed the 
world that He lived in and the world we are living in today." 



As a result of the meetings held in each of the eleven 
educational districts, the representative discussed the control 
of membership cards to the association. On motion by Char- 
moli and seconded by Miller, the members voted 48-8, that 
principals furnish a list of coaches to whom cards are to be 
issued. The Secretary is to request such list by September 1. 
Supplementary lists may be submitted by the principals or 
athletic directors at any time after the above date. 

It was proposed that the annual dues be raised to $5.00, 
with three dollars from each membership returning to the 
district. This proposal was defeated on a 24-20 vote after be- 
ing offered by Howard and seconded by Miller. 

Davenport moved and Hancock seconded a proposal that 
$100.00 (one hundred dollars) be given to each district for 
the 1970-1971 school year. Application must be made by the 
Residents of the eleven educational districts. These funds are 
to be used to provide programs at the fall meetings. Daven- 
port suggested that this plan be used for one year. Motion 
passed. 

Vince Hancock, football coach of Elizabethtown, received 
a regulation size gold football as a result of being chosen by 
his fellow coaches as "Coach of the Year" in football for the 
1969 season. The trophy was presented by Mike Murphy, 
Highlands football coach, who received the honor for 1968. 

Mote Hils, basketball coach of Covington Catholic, re- 
ceived the basketball trophy from Ralph Underhill, Ohio 
County. Hils whose quintet was ranked number one for most 
of the 1969-1970 season was chosen "Coach of the Year" 
by his fellow coaches. 

In the election of officers: Pat Dale (Danville) and Bow- 
man Davenport (Clarkson) were nominated for Sgt.-at-Arms. 
Davenport was elected. 

Secretary-Treasurer Joe Ohr (Irvine) was nominated by 
Hancock and Young seconded the nomination. Ohi was elect- 
ed for 1971-1972. 

Estill Branham, AU-Star games Manager, called the mem- 
bers' attention to the All-Star game August 8 at Bowling 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1970 



Page Eleven 



BRYAN STATION BOYS' GYMNASTICS TEAM 
1970 K.H.S.A.A. STATE CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Lamont Lawson, Derrick Johnson, David Gorham, Jimmy Sharpe, Cossey Cooper, 
Terry Clayborne. Second Row: Gary Boston, Jeff Fuller, Glenn Price, Robert Bright, Coach Paul Woodall. Third 
Row: Robert Brown, Tyrone Bond, Donald Soper, Danny Blevins, Shannon Reynolds, Clinton Edwards. 



Green. The games are to be played at Western Kentucky Uni- 
versity. A coaches' clinic is to be held in conjunction with 
the games. 

Meeting adjourned at 12 o'clock noon. Officers of the 
Kentucky High School Coaches Association: Bill Case, Bour- 
bon County, Pres.: Vince Hancock. Elizabethtown, Pres. 
Elect; Garnis Martin, Bardstown, Vice Pres.; Joe Ohr, Irvine, 
Sec. Trea.; Bowman Davenport, Clarkson, Sgt.-at-Arms. 

Prior to the regular meeting the officers of the Kentucky 
High School Coaches Association met with representatives 
of the educational districts to discuss pertinent questions 
affecting the Association. 

Representatives present were: 1st district, Fred Clayton, 
Caldwell Co.; 3rd, Ralph Underbill, Ohio Co.; 4th, Ollie 
Howard, La Rue Co.; 5th, Irv Spencer, Valley; Middle Cum- 
berland, Bill Mauney, Pulaski Co. r Central Kentucky, Pat 
Dale, Danville; Eastern Kentucky, Harold Cole, Ashland; 
Northern Kentucky, Bob Miller, Campbell Co. 

THE PULLED MUSCLE 

The prevention of the "Pulled Muscle" which is often 
associated with fatigue has long been correlated with the de- 
gree of conditioning in all sports. Here, as perhaps with any 
other sports injuries, "an ounce of prevention is worth 
a full pound of cure". Management of the injury once su- 
stained, includes early application of cole, rest of the part, 
and perhaps, more important that other factors, is the pre- 
vention and alleviation of edema. Tissue swelling is a factor 
that is seldom appreciated. It prolongs pain, limits, full move- 
ment, interferes with vascular resorption and the healing pro- 
cess. Heat, intermittent compression, graduated exercise af- 
ter a period of 24 hours may stimulate the healing phase. In- 
travenous injection of certain anaesthetic agents has been 
used with success both during the 24 to 72 hour period after 
injury and during the initial weeks following injury in more 
severe and resistent injuries. 



The American Medical Association's "Standard Nomen- 
clature of Athletic Injuries" defines a pulled muscle as "trau- 
ma to portion of musculotendinous unit from excessive for- 
cible use or stretch". Muscle ruptures in the athlete are most 
commonly seen in the biceps and triceps in the upper ex- 
tremity and in the quadriceps, hamstrings, adductors, anter- 
ior tibial and triceps surae in the lower extremity. 

There is no evidence that anyone has developed any real 
prophylactic program for "muscle pulls." It is of interest that 
these injuries have occurred most often in the more skillful 
athletes, often in the great sprinters, so undoubtedly they 
result from the terrific force these athletes are exerting 
through their quick reaction times. It is of interest that 
type of "muscle pulls" usually seen in these athletes is in the 
muscle group that functions over two joints. Research work 
has shown that such muscles do not often exert both func- 
tions at the same time. This results in a part of the muscle re- 
maining static and it is this area of the muscle that is most 
likely to rupture in the sudden push-off action such as is 
seen in the start of the dash man when he initiates his first 
thrust to extend the knee and suffers a rupture of one of the 
hamstring muscles near its origin. There are some people who 
feel that muscle fatigue plays an important role in such in- 
juries and certainly the appearance of these muscle tears so 
frequently in the great athletes, who are the ones who carry 
on strenuous training programs, serves as emphasis for this 
hypothesis. In other words, the muscle has been used beyond 
its resistance. It goes without saying that complete coordin- 
ation with all muscle groups, both those working with and 
against their antagonists, must be balanced. In that this type 
athlete works under great strain, it is likely that some in- 
juries occur as a result of loss of coordination. Some physic- 
ians who have been working with athletes and their treat- 
ment for a period of years feel that necessary warm-ups are 
of benefit, but in most cases, in the well-trained athlete, they 
lead to additional fatigue, build up emotional tension, and 
may be well over-exaggerated as to their benefits. 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1970 



One of the best examples of the part fatigue may play is 
seen in the professional baseball pitcher, many of whom re- 
quire 4 days of rest and all of whom usually develop arm fati- 
gue at the end of the season. The lack of coordination where- 
in these pitchers get their injuries is illustrated in the early 
pre-season training periods with their attempt to produce top 
performance before developing full conditioning and timing 
to bring about necessary coordination. 

Prevention and management of pulled muscles, presented 
by Ralph W. Coonrad, M.D., at the 10th National Con- 
ference on the Medical Aspects of Sports, Miami Beach, 
Florida. December 1, 1968. 

2 

'Standard Nomenclature of Athletic Injuries, American Me- 
dical Association. 

-National Federation and AMA 



THE END 



by Bill Hewgley 
South Pittsburgh High School, Tennessee 

EDITOR'S NOTE: Almost without exception, partici- 
pants can explain the value of taking part in interscholastic 
athletics much better than can adults. An example of this 
was included in the March, 1970 issue of Scholastic Coach. 
We are reprinting the following editorial with the magazine's 
permission. The item which as the magazine's editor com- 
mented, has been done so beautifully, was written by Bill 
Hewgley, basketball player from South Pittsburg High School, 
Tennessee, 1969. Who could deny that interscholastic ath- 
letics have almost unlimited possibilities for educating boys 
after sharing Bill Hewgley's thoughts: 

-Clifford B. Fagan 



The underclassmen can look forward to next year and a 
new season with new dreams. But for Eddie, Don, Bob, Dou- 
glas, Wegee, and myself there will be no next year, no more 
riving, playing, and dreaming together. We know that we had 
our chance for greatness and that we didn't achieve it. Still 
each of us can put in a little claim for greatness, because we 
know in our hearts that we stuck in there and we tried. That's 
what the fellows and I will never forget. 



"An Athlete's Prayer" 

"Help me to play the game, dear Lord, 

With all my might and main; 
Grant me the courage born of right, 

A heart to stand the strain .... 
Send me a sense of humor, Lord, 

To laugh when victory's mine- 
To laugh if I should meet defeat, 

Without a fret or whine .... 
Give me the grace to follow rules, 

To fess up when I 'm wrong, 
Wlien silence or the other thing 

Wins plaudits from the throng .... 
When foes are tough and fighting fierce, 

And I am getting weak, 
Dear God, don 't ever let me show 

A broad, bright yellow streak. 
And teach me, Lord, life 's game to play. 

Just one day at a time- 
With Thee as coach and trainer, Lord, 

Real victory must be mine. " 



An >ther season is over, finished, a season which will be 
preset 1 only in the record books . . . and in the memories 
of a great bunch of fellows. Why would anyone remember 
such a hard grind and the physical punishment? . . . running 
the mountain course until your lungs felt like bags of fire, 
the feel of sweat oozing from every pore and leaving a burn- 
ing sensation in your eyes, the taste of blood from a nose or 
Up, getting your fingers jammed or ankle sprained. . . . the 
agony of apewalks, oblique drills, sprints, and calisthenics, 
the throbbing lumps from elbows and fists a hundred differ- 
ent practice drills designed to draw upon your innermost re- 
serve of strength and force you to decide whether or not you 
really love the game. . . . the cloud of dejection and self cruci- 
fication when you are jerked from the game, chewed out, 
and told to sit on the far end of the bench for failing to fol- 
low instructions. 

All this physical and mental torture can be summed up m 
one word - pain, just pure and simple pain. 

So how can a guy tell you that he loves basketball, his 
fellow players, his coach, and everything else related to the 
fame? 

. . . the close relationships with his teammates, of how 
he felt like a brother to many of them, of how they always 
stuck together, of everyone working together as a team and 
not as five heroes, of placing his hands into the pregame hud- 
dle and saying a small prayer for God to protect . . . and God 
did protect. 

This is basketball at South Pittsburgh, the part which no 
one sees but the players, a world in which the players could 
live forever. 

The tittle world has come to an end. How can l explain 
the teaxs, lumps, the loss of speech when you walk off the 
court for the last time? How it feels to turn in your equip- 
ment and look around the dressing room where you made 
dreams and talked of greatness, and then walk out the door 
- knowing that never again will you run in at 3:00 to suit up 
for practice? 





SUPER Mini-Gym for. . . 

ISOKINETIC EXERCISE 

or 
"ACCOMMODATING RESISTANCE" 






I Hf\ : 1 






For all sports. ..more than 50 exercises! 
Automatic braking mechanism — the harder 

the pull, the more the "accommodating" 
resistance brakes, making it possible to 
always work with maximum effort. 

RiHERD'S SPORT SHOP 

734 East Main Street 
Glasgow, Kentucky 42141 

Phone 502/651-5143 

(Write for catalogue) 








TO: PRINCIPALS OF MEMBER SCHOOLS OF K.H.S.A.A. 
SUBJECT: CATASTROPHE INSURANCE POLICY 



The following information about the catastrophe insurance coverage pur- 
chased by K.H.S.A.A. to cover athletes of member schools is published for 
your consideration. The coverage will commence July 1, 1970, for the 
school year 1970-71, and will be identical with the coverage for the current 
year. 

PERSONS COVERED: Student athletes on teams of member schools of 
K.H.S.A.A. will be covered while practicing for or competing in K.H.S.A.A. 
approved inter-school athletic events or while traveling in a group directly 
to or from practice session or scheduled athletic event for the purpose of 
participating in such session or event. 

ACCIDENT MEDICAL EXPENSE BENEFIT: Expenses incurred for 
treatment of a covered injury including necessary services of a licensed 
physician, hospital expenses subject to limit for daily room and board and 
general nursing care of normal charge for semi-private room, private duty 
nursing care by R.N. on order of physician and physio-therapy performed 
while hospital confined shall be covered within fifty-two (52) weeks follow- 
ing the accident causing injury provided treatment for such injury com- 
mences within thirty (30) days of the date of covered accident. 

The first $1000.00 of covered expenses, or the amount of such expenses as 
are covered under all other collectible insurance of the policyholder and 
insured, whichever figure is greatest, will be deducted from any claim paid 
hereunder. Subject to this provision, the Company will pay up to a maxi- 
mum of $10,000.00 except that when payment under the plan exceeds^ 
$5000.00, further payment shall be 75% of the eligible charges. 

EXCLUSIONS: No payment shall be made for hernia, appendicitis, cardiac 
disease, diabetes, detached retina, osteomyelitis, malignancy or Osgood- 
Schlatters disease, or aggravation of a pre-existing condition, or for injuries 
connected with fighting or brawling. 

ADMINISTRATION: The plan is administered by The Kingden Company. 
At a later date you will be provided with information as to coverage and 
procedure to be followed in the event of a claim. 



^Ue Ki+Ufdea Go+np/HUf, 



W.E. KINGSLEY 



121-123 LAFAYETTE AVENUE 
P. O. Box 7100 



J.E. McCREARY, Mgr. 
Life Department 

LEXINGTON, KY. 40502 



GENERAL AGENT 
CHARLES C. PRICE 

PHONE 254-4095 



Order Your Football Equipment Now 
For Early August Delivery 



PLACE YOUR ORDERS AT ONCE 

We will be very happy to accept your order now for any football equip- 
ment, as well as basketball equipment. Shipment will be made at the earliest 
possible moment and October 1, 1970, dating will be extended. We have 
nationally advertised brands - complete team equipment, so let us take care 
of your needs. We'll be glad to be of service, whether you need complete 
team equipment or just a few special items. 

We can also make immediate shipment on any Spring merchandise you 
might need. 

ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT FOR YOUR SUMMER 

PLAYGROUND PROGRAMS 

If you plan to have baseball in connection with your recreation program, 
we have a complete stock of uniforms, shoes, bats, balls and gloves in Little 
League, Babe Ruth League and regulation sizes. 

Please write or call for complete information and prices, and our salesmen 
will be glad to call or give you any information and assistance you may need. 

If you need personal vacation equipment, remember that we have a com- 
plete stock of golf and fishing supplies, so let us hear from you. 



HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO. Inc. 

CH 7-1941 — PHONES — CH 7-1942 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 

AVe Ship The; Dav^Vou BuV"